Documents Reveal President’s Plan to Roll Back Trump’s Border Policy by Expanding Legal Migration

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The Biden administration has drafted a plan to boost legal immigration to the US by cutting waiting times, lowering fares and simplifying paperwork, as it tries to discourage a wave of migrants from illegally crossing the southern border. .

The 46-page plan, obtained by the New York Times, outlines a range of aspects of immigration officials trying to streamline, amid what the government fears is a long-term labor shortage.

Titled “DHS Plan to Restore Trust in Our Legal Immigration System,” it outlines numerous efforts that would have the effect of boosting immigration into the country.

A Biden administration plan seeks to boost the number of legal immigrants through several policy changes.  US citizenship candidates take their oath by the presiding officer, US magistrate Judge Peggy Kuo, during a naturalization ceremony on February 9, 2021 in Manhattan

A Biden administration plan seeks to boost the number of legal immigrants through several policy changes. US citizenship candidates take their oath by the presiding officer, US magistrate Judge Peggy Kuo, during a naturalization ceremony on February 9, 2021 in Manhattan

Among the proposals it outlines are those to bring in more coveted high-tech workers, bring in more American Indians born in Canada, and help farm workers. The administration has already taken measures to assist asylum seekers.

Attempts to lower rates that create a barrier to potential immigrants, and streamline various regulations in the cumbersome immigration system.

Immigrants Yesica Cioli, 34, and Dayana Cioli Vargas, 35, of Uruguay are sworn in as new US citizens at a naturalization ceremony as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic continues, in Joshua Tree National Park, California, US, May 4 2021

Immigrants Yesica Cioli, 34, and Dayana Cioli Vargas, 35, of Uruguay are sworn in as new US citizens at a naturalization ceremony as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic continues, in Joshua Tree National Park, California, US, May 4 2021

Immigrants Yesica Cioli, 34, and Dayana Cioli Vargas, 35, of Uruguay pose for a photo with their parents Richard and Dorca after being sworn in as new US citizens at a naturalization ceremony as the coronavirus (COVID-19) disease continues, in Joshua Tree National Park, California, USA, May 4, 2021

Immigrants Yesica Cioli, 34, and Dayana Cioli Vargas, 35, of Uruguay pose for a photo with their parents Richard and Dorca after being sworn in as new US citizens at a naturalization ceremony as the coronavirus (COVID-19) disease continues, in Joshua Tree National Park, California, USA, May 4, 2021

The Biden administration pushes for the changes as an immigration overhaul in Congress has stalled

The Biden administration pushes for the changes as an immigration overhaul in Congress has stalled

Anderson, a six-year-old unaccompanied minor from El Salvador, stands in line with other asylum-seeking children as they identify themselves with a U.S. Border Patrol officer after crossing the Rio Grande River into the United States from Mexico in La Joya, Texas, U.S. , 14 May 2021

Anderson, a six-year-old unaccompanied minor from El Salvador, stands in line with other asylum-seeking children as they identify themselves with a U.S. Border Patrol officer after crossing the Rio Grande River into the United States from Mexico in La Joya, Texas, U.S. , 14 May 2021

Asylum-seeking migrants from Central America hold their children as they sit along a dirt road while awaiting transportation by US Border Patrol after crossing the Rio Grande River into the United States from Mexico in La Joya, Texas, US, May 18 2021

Asylum-seeking migrants from Central America hold their children as they sit along a dirt road while awaiting transportation by US Border Patrol after crossing the Rio Grande River into the United States from Mexico in La Joya, Texas, US, May 18 2021

Biden has already outlined an immigration proposal that would provide a path to citizenship, but prospects in a divided Congress are uncertain on an issue that has seen little legislative movement for years.

The report comes as the nation, despite persistent unemployment, also faces a long-term labor shortage, with a declining percentage of active workers contributing to the economy as a record number of Americans retire.

Many of the policies considered would require no action from Congress, the government believes.

Measures to speed up the process include efforts to make greater use of virtual interviews and electronic archiving, while lowering the barrier to evidence that migrants are required to provide.

Its aim is to make the system “more effective and less cumbersome” and to “reduce paperwork and other administrative requirements” in agencies known for their Byzantine processes. Anyone who can demonstrate that they have been a victim of domestic violence can also apply for asylum. Native Americans born in Canada would also see expanded opportunities to migrate.

The moves come as Biden continues to face political challenges on the right over the crisis on the southern border, amid a wave of undocumented child migrants.

Former UK Independence Party leader Nigel Farage, who campaigned with Donald Trump in 2016, appeared on former Trump chief strategist Steve Bannon’s War Room Pandemic to claim that a “really shocking” number of criminal gang members are being smuggled into the country.

“These people travel 60 miles across the desert, dressed in full camouflage, and pay up to $8,000 each to enter,” he said. said. “They hide during the day, they march at night until they get to the highways and farms. He added: “They are picked up by criminal gangs and taken to the drug gangs that are destroying the lives of millions of Americans.”

He posted a video of his own border visit and urged Vice President Kamala Harris to visit the border.

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