Leaked NASA documents as pictured above show an ambitious plan to bring people back to the moon and eventually develop a long-term basis there according to Ars Technica

Leaked documents reveal NASA & # 39; s Artemis mission will require 37 LAUNCH while preparing to put people back on the surface in just five years and establish a lunar base by 2028

  • Leaked documents show the breadth and ambition of NASA's Artemis project
  • Ars Technica reports that the plan will include 37 launches and a lunar base in 2028
  • The costs will be the biggest obstacle to the mission, with an amount of $ 6 to $ 8 billion a year
  • A lunar base can make future launches easier and expand the industry

NASA & # 39; s next trip to the moon will entail 37 separate launches over a decade and culminate in the construction of a moon base in 2028, according to leaked documents describing the & # 39; Artemis & # 39; plan of the office .

Information about the budding mission comes from documents obtained by Ars Technica, and shows for the first time a detailed picture of America & # 39; s first human-led mission to the moon since 1972.

In a chart, NASA breaks a year-by-year guide to building the & # 39; Gateway & # 39; a space station and a waypoint on the way to the moon, human test flights and a moon landing planned for 2024.

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Leaked NASA documents as pictured above show an ambitious plan to bring people back to the moon and eventually develop a long-term basis there according to Ars Technica

Leaked NASA documents as pictured above show an ambitious plan to bring people back to the moon and eventually develop a long-term basis there according to Ars Technica

WHAT IS NASA'S LUNARY GATEWAY?

Russia and the United States are working together on a NASA project to build the first lunar space station, codenamed the Lunar Gateway.

The agreement, signed in September 2017, is part of a long-term project to send people to Mars.

The space port managed by the crew will orbit the moon and serve as a & # 39; gateway to the deep space and lunar surface & # 39 ;, NASA said.

The first modules of the station could be ready in 2024.

An international base for human and robot moon exploration and a spacecraft landing is a major contender for following the $ 100 billion International Space Station (ISS), & # 39; the world's largest space project so far.

In the final stages of NASA's timeline, the chart suggests the deployment of a & # 39; lunar surface activity & # 39; of which Ars Technica suggests the first phases of an outpost on the moon, where future crew members can stay for longer forward missions.

As noted by Ars Technica, the documents do not show the costs of such missions that, given the revealed size and complexity, can be astronomical.

NASA has already requested an additional $ 1.6 billion in funding per year and, according to an unnamed source quoted by Ars Technica, Artemis will cost around $ 6 to $ 8 billion per year on top of its $ 20 billion budget the desk.

Funding for the project was already a major political problem in the US, where President Donald Trump's government proposed diverting the $ 1.6 billion needed to launch the mission of a reserve fund for federal Pell Grants.

Pell Grants are a federal grant that is awarded to students who need money for school and according to data from College board, 22.2 million students received money from the program between 2017 and 2018.

The US will not be the only one to develop a permanent base on the moon.

Helping the ambitious project will be an announcement from China in April that revealed plans to build a lunar base at the south pole of the moon.

The first parts of the base could reach the surface of the moon as soon as 2020 according to a report from Space.com.

NASA has just announced the 11 companies that will design and study prototypes of the various equipment and vehicles used this month in the mission – including Boeing, SpaceX, Blue Origin, Northrop Grumman and more.

Aerospace Blue Origin, supported by billionaire Jeff Bezos, will be one of the companies that wants to contribute to NASA's next mission.

Aerospace Blue Origin, supported by billionaire Jeff Bezos, will be one of the companies that wants to contribute to NASA's next mission.

Aerospace Blue Origin, supported by billionaire Jeff Bezos, will be one of the companies that wants to contribute to NASA's next mission.

The US will not be the only company that fought to build a long-term base on the moon. In April, China also said it is facing a moon hub

The US will not be the only company that fought to build a long-term base on the moon. In April, China also said it is facing a moon hub

The US will not be the only company that fought to build a long-term base on the moon. In April, China also said it is facing a moon hub

Although the moon may not be a suitable environment for mass human colonization, the prospect of developing a base has attracted agencies around the world for various reasons.

One of the potential benefits, say proponents, is access to resources such as iron or uranium that are below the surface of the moon, and the potential benefit for future space launches – theoretically it could be much simpler and cheaper to ship spacecraft from launch the moon. .

By settling on the moon, even in relatively small numbers, people would also gain an unprecedented insight into the human colonization of the solar system, the prospect of which has become increasingly serious, as climate change and the ever-expanding human populations are shadowing throw over the earth. future.

WHEN IS NASA BACK TO THE MOON?

In a statement in March, NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine planned to send people first to the moon and then to Mars and said: NASA is on its way to get people back on the moon by 2028.

The plan is based on the developing Space Launch System and the Orion spacecraft, together with the Gateway orbital platform.

SLS and Orion are expected to be ready for their first non-propelled test flight in 2020.

Construction on Gateway – an outpost in orbit around the moon – is expected to start as early as 2022.

& # 39; We are going to the moon in the next decade with innovative new technologies and systems to explore more locations on the moon surface than ever before & # 39 ;, said Bridenstine.

& # 39; This time we will stay if we go to the moon.

& # 39; We will use what we learn as we go to the moon to make the next giant leap – sending astronauts to Mars. & # 39;

Vice President Mike Pence, however, tore up these plans and statements when he unexpectedly announced a new deadline in March expressing intentions to put people on the moon by 2024 – four years earlier.

The VP called on NASA to re-ignite the spark of urgency for space exploration and make it a priority to & # 39; bold targets & # 39; establish and stay on schedule.

NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine added a week later, early April, that the agency would be very close to & # 39; would be to deliver a plan.

This has been missed for several weeks and the House Science Committee is now expressing its dissatisfaction about the lack of an executable plan or program from the space agency.

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