Doctors told this woman with Lyme disease to try & # 39; meditation & # 39; and that she didn't look bad & # 39;

Doctors told twins of two who had rejected Lyme disease and rejected her symptoms as they had imagined. They told her to try & # 39; meditation & # 39; because it did not look & # 39; unwell & # 39 ;.

Katherine Wood, from Stow, Massachusetts, went for a nature walk with her young son and his boyfriend in November 2016 when she was bitten by a tick.

Because she didn't have a fever, headache or skin rash, the 37-year-old woman thought she was doing well.

But over the next few months, Wood's symptoms worsened and she saw more than a dozen specialists who had diagnosed her incorrectly or told her that they didn't think anything was wrong.

One even told her that her symptoms were probably psychosomatic and that they tried meditation.

Finally, almost a year after the symptoms started, Wood was correctly diagnosed by a Lyme-literate doctor and brought to an intense regimen of oral and injectable antibiotics.

Written for in a first-person account Health, Wood says she feels better than months ago, and encourages others to trust their stomachs and argue for themselves when they feel something is wrong.

Katherine Wood, 37 (pictured, right, with her husband), from Stow, Massachusetts, was bitten on a tick during a nature walk in November 2016

Katherine Wood, 37 (pictured, right, with her husband), from Stow, Massachusetts, was bitten on a tick during a nature walk in November 2016

She began to experience symptoms such as shortness of breath, chest pain, neck stiffness, and numbness in the hands. On the photo: wood with one of her sons

She began to experience symptoms such as shortness of breath, chest pain, neck stiffness, and numbness in the hands. On the photo: wood with one of her sons

She began to experience symptoms such as shortness of breath, chest pain, neck stiffness, and numbness in the hands. On the photo: wood with one of her sons

Lyme disease is a tick-borne disease that generally causes rashes and joint pains and muscle weakness. It can usually be treated with a few weeks of oral antibiotics.

But if left untreated, the infection can spread to the joints, the heart and nervous symptoms and be fatal.

Wood said she didn't even know she was bitten until her husband attached the tick to her the day after the nature walk.

& # 39; What I knew about Lyme disease at the time told me that I would develop a rash or flu-like symptoms if the tick actually transmitted the disease to me & # 39 ;, she wrote in Health.

& # 39; None of these characters appeared, so I assumed I was fine. That flawed assumption has drastically changed my life. & # 39;

WHAT IS LYME'S DISEASE?

Lyme disease is caused by a bacterium that is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected black-legged tigers.

The most common symptoms of the disease are fever, headache, fatigue and skin rash called erythema migrans.

The disease can usually be treated with several weeks of oral antibiotics.

But if left untreated, the infection can spread to the joints, the heart and nervous symptoms and be fatal.

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU ARE INFECTED?

These symptoms may occur during the first three to thirty days of infection:

  • Fever
  • Shivers
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle and joint pains
  • Swollen lymph nodes
  • Erythema migrans (EM) skin rash

The result occurs in approximately 80 percent of infected people.

It can expand to 30 cm, eventually clean up and display the appearance of a target or a bull's-eye.

Later symptoms of Lyme disease are:

  • Severe headache and neck stiffness
  • Extra skin rash
  • Arthritis with joint pain and swelling
  • Facial of Bell & # 39; s paralysis
  • Palpitations
  • Problems with short-term memory
  • Nerve pain

Source: CDC

It took until February before Wood began to experience symptoms such as shortness of breath and chest pain.

She was diagnosed with heartburn and received a prescription, but that didn't work. Her doctor then concluded that she had a virus that would naturally go its own way.

Wood said her mother called the tick bite from November and recommended a test for Lyme disease. The test came back negative.

& # 39; I had no reason to doubt my doctor or the test results, & # 39; wrote Wood. & # 39; With Lyme excluded, I went on to determine what happened to my body. & # 39;

In the following months, Wood saw 13 different specialists because her chest pain worsened, her neck became stiff, and her hands were always numb or tingling.

A rheumatologist said she had costochondritis, or an inflammation of the cartilage that connects the rib to the breastbone. A neurologist told her that she had a carpal tunnel syndrome.

Wood's doctor even told her that her symptoms can be psychosomatic and that she should try meditation.

& # 39; I started to feel hopeless & # 39 ;, Wood wrote in Health. & # 39; How could I have gone from being 100 (percent) healthy to having everything

She returned to her doctor and asked the infectious disease specialist who told Wood: & # 39; You don't look unwell. & # 39;

Wood had another disease test for Lyme disease, which also reacted negatively.

Her mother booked an appointment with the head of the infectious disease at a Boston hospital.

The doctor performed another test, a C6 Lyme ELISA that he said was more effective than the tests Wood had already performed. It was positive.

She had started a three-week course of the antibiotic doxycyclinem.

& # 39; I soon found out that with sign infections your symptoms get much worse during treatment & # 39 ;, Wood wrote. & # 39; When you use antibiotics, a huge number of infectious organisms die, causing an inflammatory response in your body. & # 39;

Wood went to the doctor at the end of the three weeks and reported her condition, but the doctor said she was healed and that her pain was probably due to & # 39; damage from the infection & # 39 ;.

She found a local doctor in October who sent her blood for examination, confirming that she still had the disease.

Several doctors have wrongly diagnosed her and a doctor has told her to try & # 39; meditation & # 39; and that she did not look & # 39; unwell & # 39 ;. On the photo: wood with one of her sons

Several doctors have wrongly diagnosed her and a doctor has told her to try & # 39; meditation & # 39; and that she did not look & # 39; unwell & # 39 ;. On the photo: wood with one of her sons

Wood was finally diagnosed with Lyme disease, a tick-borne disease, in July 2017 and received a three-week antibiotic. On the photo: wood with one of her sons

Wood was finally diagnosed with Lyme disease, a tick-borne disease, in July 2017 and received a three-week antibiotic. On the photo: wood with one of her sons

Several doctors have wrongly diagnosed her and a doctor has told her to try & # 39; meditation & # 39; and that she did not look & # 39; unwell & # 39 ;. Wood was finally diagnosed with Lyme disease, a tick-borne disease, in July 2017 and received a three-week antibiotic. Pictured, left and right: wood with one of her sons

Another doctor has prescribed her both oral and injectable antibiotics (photo). Wood has been in treatment for 18 months and said she wants to encourage others to be their own lawyer

Another doctor has prescribed her both oral and injectable antibiotics (photo). Wood has been in treatment for 18 months and said she wants to encourage others to be their own lawyer

Another doctor has prescribed her both oral and injectable antibiotics (photo). Wood has been in treatment for 18 months and said she wants to encourage others to be their own lawyer

Wood found a Lyme-literate doctor, Dr. Jeanne Hubbuch, whom she met for an appointment with November.

& # 39; She reviewed my test results with me for an hour and a half and then looked at me and said: & # 39; You are fixable & # 39;, & # 39; Wood wrote for Health.

Dr. Hubbuch placed Wood on a series of both injectable and oral antibiotics. Wood has been in treatment for 18 months and said, although she still has a long way to go, she feels much better than a year ago.

& # 39; Ticks are nature's dirty needles – with countless different bacteria, viruses and fungi, & # 39; wrote Wood.

& # 39; Dr. Hubbuch recommends removing an attached tick and sending it for tick tests to determine which pathogens it carries. That way you know what to treat if symptoms appear. & # 39;

Wood said she now wants to encourage others to test if they believe something is wrong and protect themselves when they are outside.

& # 39; Untreated Lyme has stolen two and a half years so far, & she said. & # 39; My goal is to achieve forgiveness and live a symptom-free life. I now find comfort in taking the right precautions to protect myself and my family.

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