WhatsNew2Day
Latest News And Breaking Headlines

Doctor reveals why King Charles III’s ‘sausage fingers’ are so swollen and red

A doctor has revealed the potential health problems the new King Charles III may be suffering from as royal onlookers stare at his ‘swollen fingers’.

The death of the king’s 96-year-old mother on Friday exposed Her Majesty’s ill health. Doctors claimed everything from peripheral vascular disease and even a broken heart may have been responsible for her death.

But now attention is turned to her 73-year-old heir and his red and swollen hands and feet, with photos of the limbs being shared on social media since Queen Elizabeth II’s death.

Senior Lecturer at the British University of Chester Dr. Gareth Nye told the Daily star that various painful health problems may be responsible.

Senior Lecturer at the British University of Chester Dr.  Gareth Nye told the Daily Star that several painful health conditions could be responsible for King Charles III's swollen fingers

Senior Lecturer at the British University of Chester Dr. Gareth Nye told the Daily Star that several painful health conditions could be responsible for King Charles III’s swollen fingers

Edema is a condition where the body starts to retain fluid in the limbs, normally the legs and ankles but also the fingers, causing them to swell,” said Dr. Nye to the publication.

“To see if this is the cause, pressing the swollen area for about 15 seconds would cause a depression in the area.”

Women are more likely to have edema than men because their hormone, progesterone, tends to cause it, so some women notice that they get swollen ankles just before their period.

Older people can develop the condition if they sit for long periods of time.

Another possible reason for the “sausage fingers,” as King Charles III referred to in a letter to a friend after Prince William’s birth, is arthritis.

Edema is a condition where the body starts to retain fluid in the limbs, normally the legs and ankles but also the fingers, causing them to swell,

Edema is a condition where the body starts to retain fluid in the limbs, normally the legs and ankles but also the fingers, causing them to swell,

Edema is a condition where the body starts to retain fluid in the limbs, normally the legs and ankles but also the fingers, causing them to swell,” said Dr. Nye to the publication.

Arthritis – another common condition in the over 60s. It often affects three main areas in the hand: the thumb joint or both joints in the fingers,” he said.

“Fingers usually become stiff, sore and swollen and while medication can help with the pain, the swelling can persist.”

If neither applies to the royal family, it could be a high-salt diet or specific medications like those for high blood pressure.

But it’s not necessarily something to worry about, as it’s most likely caused by his age.

On Friday, a doctor pointed to the queen’s frail appearance at her last royal appointment as a sign that she would die within days.

If neither applies to the royal, it could be a high-salt diet or specific medications like those for high blood pressure

If neither applies to the royal, it could be a high-salt diet or specific medications like those for high blood pressure

If neither applies to the royal, it could be a high-salt diet or specific medications like those for high blood pressure

dr. Deb Cohen-Jones, who lives in Perth, Western Australia, said photos of Queen Elizabeth II’s hands posing next to the UK’s new Prime Minister, Liz Truss, at Balmoral Castle in Scotland on Tuesday may have been a sign of declining health.

‘It seems that there may be indications of peripheral vascular disease. It’s a blood circulation disorder that causes the blood vessels outside your heart and brain to constrict, block, or spasm,” she told FEMAIL.

‘It can sometimes lead to heart failure. When your peripheral circulation is this bad, organs don’t get a good blood supply. It could be a sign of multi-organ failure.’

An Australian doctor has pointed to the Queen's frail appearance during her last royal appointment as a sign that she would die within days.

An Australian doctor has pointed to the Queen's frail appearance during her last royal appointment as a sign that she would die within days.

An Australian doctor has pointed to the Queen’s frail appearance during her last royal appointment as a sign that she would die within days.

dr.  Deb Cohen-Jones said photos of Queen Elizabeth II's purple-tinted hands (pictured) as she posed next to the UK's new Prime Minister Liz Truss two days ago is a sign of declining health

dr.  Deb Cohen-Jones said photos of Queen Elizabeth II's purple-tinted hands (pictured) as she posed next to the UK's new Prime Minister Liz Truss two days ago is a sign of declining health

dr. Deb Cohen-Jones said photos of Queen Elizabeth II’s purple-tinted hands (pictured) as she posed next to the UK’s new Prime Minister Liz Truss two days ago is a sign of declining health

What is Peripheral Vascular Disease?

Peripheral vascular disease is a slow and progressive circulatory disorder.

Narrowing, blockage, or spasm in a blood vessel can cause PVD.

PVD can affect any blood vessel outside the heart, including the arteries, veins, or lymphatics.

Organs supplied by these blood vessels, such as the brain and legs, may not receive enough blood flow for proper function. However, the legs and feet are most commonly affected.

Peripheral vascular disease is also referred to as peripheral arterial disease.

Some of the known symptoms include intermittent pain, which can manifest as cramps or muscle fatigue, ‘coldness’ of the affected body part, numbness and tingling.

The late Queen’s hands were “spotted,” which usually occurs when the heart can no longer pump blood effectively.

Blood pressure drops slowly and blood flow through the body slows, leaving the limbs feeling cold, Intersection Hospice reported.

Sadly, Dr Deb confirmed that Queen Elizabeth II would have been “in a lot of pain” if she suffered from the chronic illness because “it looks pretty serious.”

Unfortunately, Dr.  Deb that Queen Elizabeth II 'would have been in a lot of pain' if she suffered from the chronic illness because 'it looks pretty serious'

Unfortunately, Dr.  Deb that Queen Elizabeth II 'would have been in a lot of pain' if she suffered from the chronic illness because 'it looks pretty serious'

Unfortunately, Dr. Deb that Queen Elizabeth II ‘would have been in a lot of pain’ if she suffered from the chronic illness because ‘it looks pretty serious’

This official announcement from Buckingham Palace stated that the Queen has conducted the historic audience

This official announcement from Buckingham Palace stated that the Queen has conducted the historic audience

This official announcement from Buckingham Palace stated that the Queen has conducted the historic audience

1662950910 644 Doctor reveals why King Charles IIIs sausage fingers are so

1662950910 644 Doctor reveals why King Charles IIIs sausage fingers are so

“The slightly bent appearance would have been her age and more than likely osteoporosis,” said Dr. Deb (photo)

It is not certain how long the ‘spots’ have been there, as the monarch had not been seen in public for a while and often wore gloves.

So it was more than likely her incredibly strong character and will to complete the royal engagement that saw her beaming at Liz Truss on Tuesday.

“The slightly bent appearance would have been her age and more than likely osteoporosis,” said Dr. The B.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More