Do you want to increase your score on the math test? Sit up straight, say scientists

Researchers in San Francisco found that more than half of students found that problems were easier to solve if they said directly.

If the math tests terrify you, then the help could be as simple as sitting up straight.

Researchers have found that more than half of students found problems easier to solve if they had good posture.

They say that the technique could be useful even for athletes, public speakers and musicians.

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Researchers in San Francisco found that more than half of students found that problems were easier to solve if they said directly.

Researchers in San Francisco found that more than half of students found that problems were easier to solve if they said directly.

HOW WAS THE EXPERIMENT WORKED?

In the new study conducted by researchers at San Francisco State University, 125 college students were evaluated to see how well they could perform simple mathematical operations, subtracting 7 from 843 sequentially for 15 seconds, while falling or sitting with their shoulders toward back and relaxed.

Fifty-six percent of students reported that they find it easier to do math upright.

Before the study began, students completed an anonymous questionnaire asking them to rate their anxiety levels while taking tests and doing math; They also described any physical stress symptoms they experienced during the test.

"For people who are eager for math, posture makes a huge difference," said San Francisco State Health Education professor Erik Peper.

"The collapsed position stops them and their brains do not work so well.

"You can not think so clearly."

Fifty-six percent of students reported that they find it easier to do math upright.

According to co-author Associate Professor of Health Education, Richard Harvey, the fall is a defensive posture that can trigger old negative memories in the body and brain.

While students without mathematical anxiety did not report a great benefit of better posture, they discovered that doing math while collapsing was somewhat more difficult.

Peper and Harvey say that these findings about body position can help people prepare for different types of performance under stress, not just for math tests.

Athletes, musicians and public speakers can benefit from a better position before and during their performance.

Athletes, musicians and public speakers can benefit from a better position before and during their performance, the researchers said. In the photo, Prince

Athletes, musicians and public speakers can benefit from a better position before and during their performance, the researchers said. In the photo, Prince

Athletes, musicians and public speakers can benefit from a better position before and during their performance, the researchers said. In the photo, Prince

"You have an option," Peper said. & # 39; It is about using an empowered position to optimize your focus & # 39;

That empowerment could be particularly useful for students facing the so-called "stereotyped threat," said Lauren Mason, one of the article's authors and a recent SF State graduate.

DO YOU HAVE A PERFECT POSTURE IN YOUR DESKTOP?

Experts advise people to use the technique & # 39; BBC & # 39 ;: put your butt on the back of the chair.

Put it on the back, as if you were sitting on the bottom of your jeans pocket, instead of on top.

Sitting correctly will re-align your pelvis in the correct position.

To stand tall, stand evenly on two feet, keep your back straight, knees soft and buttocks tight.

Imagine a rope in the middle of your head that pulls you high.

Regardless of whether you are standing, sitting or walking, pull the muscles of your belly at all times and then release the middle so you can still feel them working. This helps to tone them and reduces the risk of back pain.

Do not use laptops for long periods of time.

Try not to sit for more than 30 minutes without standing up, even for a few seconds. This will allow different muscles to contract and blood to flow around

"I always felt insecure about my math skills even though I excelled in other subjects," said Mason, who helped design the experiment in the study.

& # 39; Build a relationship with [math] So early – as early as elementary school. You can carry that negative internal conversation throughout your life, which affects your perception of yourself. "

Mason said the results of the study show a simple way to improve many aspects of life, especially when it comes to stress: "The way we behave and interact in space influences not only how others perceive us but also in how we perceive ourselves. "

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