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DIY: the new pajamas, designed by scientists in America, mean that people don't have to spend the night in a sleep laboratory to be assessed for health concerns

Do you suffer the nightmare that is restless sleep? Smart pajamas can give you sweet dreams

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Can & # 39; smart & # 39; pajamas & # 39; s help you get a better night's sleep? That is the theory behind a new piece of clothing designed by American engineers.

& # 39; Phyjama & # 39; is embedded with sensors that constantly monitor heart rate, breathing and posture – factors that influence how well a person sleeps.

The researchers, who presented their results at the American Chemical Society conference, say that the data, as well as doctors, can provide useful information to improve sleep patterns and even recognize sleep disorders.

The right amount of good quality sleep can protect against stress, infections and diseases, including heart and kidney diseases, high blood pressure and diabetes.

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DIY: the new pajamas, designed by scientists in America, mean that people don't have to spend the night in a sleep laboratory to be assessed for health concerns

DIY: the new pajamas, designed by scientists in America, mean that people don't have to spend the night in a sleep laboratory to be assessed for health concerns

Good quality sleep quality also increases mental acuity and improves decision making. But research shows that up to one in three people ever suffer from insomnia, with conditions such as type 2 diabetes and aging significantly increasing the risk.

The new pajamas means that people do not have to spend the night in a sleep laboratory to be assessed.

The garment, developed at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, in the US, has five textile plasters with sensors spread over the lining of the jacket.

The patches are connected to each other via silver nylon threads covered with cotton – they are in turn linked to a small circuit board that is part of one of the buttons on the pajama top.

Four of the sensors detect pressure, such as that of a bed against the body of the sleeper, to determine movements and sleeping position.

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The fifth sensor records heart and respiratory rhythms, which can show how well a person is sleeping and, for example, can help identify a sleep disorder.

The breathing pattern can show if a person has sleep apnea, whereby the walls of the throat relax during sleep and interrupt normal breathing.

Would you buy them? The pajamas, which are expected to cost between £ 80 and £ 160 and will be available within two years, are being further developed.

Would you buy them? The pajamas, which are expected to cost between £ 80 and £ 160 and will be available within two years, are being further developed.

Would you buy them? The pajamas, which are expected to cost between £ 80 and £ 160 and will be available within two years, are being further developed.

Data from the sensors are continuously transferred to the printed circuit board and can then be opened via a computer by the wearer or a doctor.

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This information should help patients find ways to sleep better. People who sleep on their side tend to snore less and have fewer episodes where they stop breathing compared to those who sleep on their backs.

Recent studies with volunteers showed that the pajamas were comfortable and did not interrupt sleep. And the sensor measurements were found to be accurate, according to independent validation.

The pajamas, which are expected to cost between £ 80 and £ 160 and will be available within two years, are being further developed.

They may have extra patches on their pants to follow walking, which the researchers say could be used to prevent falls in the elderly.

Jaydip Ray, a surgeon in ears, nose and throat and a professor of otology and neurology at the University of Sheffield, said: “Wearable sensors are now pretty ubiquitous.

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& # 39; This technology makes this unobtrusive enough to get real-life measurements that can be collected and monitored remotely, giving a correct picture of sleep patterns.

& # 39; The wider implications for studying sleep disorders using this technology are huge. & # 39;

WHAT HAPPENS WITH OUR BODIES IF WE STAY AT THE END OF WAKE UP?

Not sleeping for days on end can cause a series of symptoms and can even be fatal.

Within the first 24 hours of lack of sleep, the body's hormone levels change, leading to an increase in blood pressure, SLATE reported.

On day two, the body is no longer able to properly break down glucose, leading to uncontrollable cravings in carbohydrates.

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A person's body temperature also drops and their immune system is affected.

Although no one has ever been reported as insomnia deaths, a 1980s study by the University of Chicago found that rats died after 32 days of total sleep deprivation.

The rodent's body temperature is thought to have fallen so much that they developed hypothermia.

Their immune system may also have become so weak that bacteria that are normally confined to their intestines spread through their bodies.

Another theory is that the animals were so stressed that they died.

One of the most famous insomnia is music teacher Michael Corke, from New Lenox, Illinois, who suffered from the rare disease fatal familial insomnia.

He died at the age of 42 after an alleged six months of total sleep deprivation, but it cannot be said with certainty that insomnia killed him.

But it is Randy Gardner who keeps the record without sleep for the longest time.

In 1964, when in high school in San Diego, the then 17 year old stayed awake for 11 days and 25 minutes.

During the experiment, Gardner developed speech and memory problems and began to hallucinate, Sleepio reported.

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