Do you have to take 10,000 steps per day? Study finds walking HALF can reduce the risk of early death

Do you really need 10,000 steps a day? New study finds walking HALF because there is much enough risk of early death

  • Older women who took around 4,400 steps per day were 41 percent less likely to die than women who walked roughly 2,700 steps per day.
  • The mortality rates decreased further with more steps before they were leveled at around 7,500 steps per day
  • This comes after new physical guidelines from the American Heart Association, which says that any amount of exercise contributes to overall health

We have all heard that taking 10,000 steps every day is essential to maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

But a new study suggests that you might lower that daily benchmark and take half the number of steps.

Researchers from Brigham and the Women's Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, discovered that older women who took only 4,400 steps a day reduced their risk of premature death by more than 40 percent.

The mortality rate decreased by more steps before it was leveled by approximately 7,500 steps per day.

The team says the findings can encourage people who want to be less seated – but find 10,000 steps to be a daunting number – to get some physical activity into their day.

A new study by Brigham and the Women & # 39; s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, has shown that older women who have taken 4,500 steps a day have reduced their risk of premature death by 41% (file image)

A new study by Brigham and the Women & # 39; s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, has shown that older women who have taken 4,500 steps a day have reduced their risk of premature death by 41% (file image)

For the study, published in JAMA Internal Medicine, the team looked at more than 16,700 women between the ages of 62 and 101 for four years.

The number of steps of the participants was monitored every day with portable devices.

Researchers discovered that achieving less than half that & # 39; magic & # 39; 10,000 number diminished the risk of early death in older women.

Women who reached around 4,400 steps per day were 41 percent less likely to die than women who walked roughly 2,700 steps per day.

The mortality rates decreased further with more steps before they were leveled at around 7,500 steps.

& # 39; Taking 10,000 steps a day can sound daunting. But we notice that even a modest increase in steps taken is associated with a significantly lower mortality rate among older women, & co-author Dr. I-Min Lee, a professor of epidemiology at Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health.

Researchers believe the 10,000 steps per day guideline came from a Japanese company that made a pedometer called Manpo-kei, which translates to & # 39; 10, 000 step meters & # 39 ;. They believe this name was chosen because the Japanese character for & # 39; 10, 000 & # 39; resembles a person walking (above)

Researchers believe the 10,000 steps per day guideline came from a Japanese company that made a pedometer called Manpo-kei, which translates to & # 39; 10, 000 step meters & # 39 ;. They believe this name was chosen because the Japanese character for & # 39; 10, 000 & # 39; resembles a person walking (above)

Researchers believe the 10,000 steps per day guideline came from a Japanese company that made a pedometer called Manpo-kei, which translates to & # 39; 10, 000 step meters & # 39 ;. They believe this name was chosen because the Japanese character for & # 39; 10, 000 & # 39; resembles a person walking (above)

& # 39; Our study contributes to a growing understanding of the importance of physical activity to health, clarifies the number of steps related to lower mortality and reinforces the message: step more – even a little more is useful. & # 39;

So where did this 10,000-step guideline come from?

The authors don't know for sure, but believe it dates from around 1965 as a marketing strategy in Japan.

The company made a pedometer called Manpo-kei, which translates into Japanese to & # 39; 10, 000 step meter & # 39 ;.

Dr. Lee told The Atlantic Ocean that she believes this name was chosen because the Japanese character for & # 39; 10, 000 & # 39; looks like a person walking (with a hat and a cane).

The results of the new study come at the heels of the updated physical guidelines administered by the American Heart Association.

Old guidelines suggested that an adult should do 10 minutes or more of aerobic activity per day.

But the updated ones say that any amount of exercise contributes to overall health.

& # 39; Of course, no studies are alone. But in our work we continue to argue for the importance of physical activity, & said Dr. Lee.

& # 39; We hope these findings will encourage those for whom 10,000 steps a day seem unreachable. & # 39;

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