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Researchers discovered that sensitive areas of the skin are often missed - especially when applying moisturizers with sun protection factor (SPF) as opposed to conventional sunscreens

Do not miss your eyelids when you apply sunscreen or risk skin cancer, warn academics

  • Researchers discovered that vulnerable parts of the skin are often missed
  • This could give people the risk of skin cancer, academics warned
  • Skin cancer is increasing despite worldwide initiatives to increase the use of SPF
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We all know the dangers of too much sun – but research has shown that we can put ourselves at risk by not protecting our eyelids.

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Researchers discovered that sensitive parts of the skin are often missed – especially when applying sunscreen with sun protection factor (SPF) as opposed to conventional sunscreens.

This could leave people at risk for skin cancer, warned University of Liverpool academics.

Skin cancer is increasing despite worldwide initiatives to increase the use of SPF.

Researchers discovered that sensitive areas of the skin are often missed - especially when applying moisturizers with sun protection factor (SPF) as opposed to conventional sunscreens

Researchers discovered that sensitive areas of the skin are often missed – especially when applying moisturizers with sun protection factor (SPF) as opposed to conventional sunscreens

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Although moisturisers during the day with added SPF are useful, the researchers were concerned that they were not applied in a way that & # 39; provided adequate protection & # 39; offers.

They studied how 84 people – 62 women and 22 men – applied both moisturizer and sunscreen before using an ultraviolet-sensitive camera to take photos of the volunteers to show much of their faces that they had covered.

Seventeen percent of the face was missed with SPF moisturizer compared to 11 percent with sunscreen.

Around the eyelids – which are thin and more susceptible to cancer – 21 percent of the area was missed with SPF moisturizer, while 14 percent were missed with sunscreen.

This was particularly worrying because skin cancers usually occur on the head and neck, with eyelids having the highest incidence of the disease, the researchers wrote.

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Squamous cell carcinoma – the second most common form of skin cancer in the UK – is also increasingly affecting patients' eyelids.

This could leave people at risk for skin cancer, warned University of Liverpool academics

This could leave people at risk for skin cancer, warned University of Liverpool academics

This could leave people at risk for skin cancer, warned University of Liverpool academics

Participants completed a questionnaire about their habits for applying sunscreen and SPF moisturizers, most of whom did not know that they had not completely covered their faces, according to the research in the PLOS One magazine.

The authors said: & # 39; When applying both sunscreen and moisturizer, the area around the eyes is often missed, especially near the nose. Participants covered a smaller part of the face when using a moisturizer compared to sunscreen. We conclude that special attention must be paid to the eyelid area when applying an SPF cream. & # 39;

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About 78 percent of the participants failed to protect the area between the corners of the eyes and the nose, regardless of whether they applied sunscreen or moisturizer. Sunglasses with UV filters can help protect missed areas, the experts said.

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