Divorce rates are falling to the lowest level in 40 years – except for boomers

The divorce rate drops to its lowest level in 40 years – except for boomers who split THREE TIMES more than the generation before them

  • The total American divorce rate dropped to the lowest level since 1979 in 2017
  • Younger people are driving the decline, probably by postponing the marriage
  • But baby boomers have sky-high divorce rates from a generation earlier
  • Many are in less stable second marriages after the divorce boom of the 1970s
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Baby boomers lead when it comes to divorce, even if the rest of the country sees divorce rates falling to the lowest level in 40 years.

In 2017, divorce rates for boomers aged 55 to 64 increased by 200 percent, to 15 divorces per 1,000 marriages, from just 5 divorces for the same age group in 1990, according to National center for family and marriage research at Bowling Green University.

For those aged 65 and over, the divorce rate rose to 5 from 1.8 in the same period.

In general, however, the national divorce rate had dropped considerably and fell from 19 to 15 in the 27-year period – driven by millennials and zoomers who later marry and divorce much less frequently.

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The percentage change in the number of divorces for certain age groups between 1990 and 2017

The percentage change in the number of divorces for certain age groups between 1990 and 2017

& # 39; These boomers are wild & # 39 ;, Wendy D. Manning, co-director of Center for Family and Marriage Research, joked in an interview with DailyMail.com.

Manning explained that divorce rates for couples were strong the first time in the 1970s, because a wave of legal changes made non-debt divorces the norm in most states.

The national divorce rate reached its peak in 1979, with many boomers who eagerly and youngly married and made use of the new laws.

The sharp increase in divorces in the 1970s is now coming back to chase and remarry some of those who separated with their first partner.

& # 39; Many of them experience second or third marriages and they are less stable & # 39 ;, Manning said about the 55th anniversary and the older age cohort.

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& # 39; Of course, some of these are first marriages – you have these long marriages that make you wonder & # 39; why do we do this? & # 39; & # 39;

This graph shows the total national divorce rate over time, represented as the number of divorces per 1,000 marriages. The divorces reached a peak in the late 1970s

This graph shows the total national divorce rate over time, represented as the number of divorces per 1,000 marriages. The divorces reached a peak in the late 1970s

This graph shows the total national divorce rate over time, represented as the number of divorces per 1,000 marriages. The divorces reached a peak in the late 1970s

The rising divorce rates among boomers were offset by the sharp fall in the number of millennial divorces.

& # 39; People are waiting longer to get married and are more selective about getting married & # 39 ;, Manning said.

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The largest decrease observed by the researchers was among 15 to 24 year olds, whose divorce rate dropped by 43 percent, to 27 divorces per 1,000 marriages from 47 per 1,000.

The percentage for 25 to 34 year-olds also dropped considerably, from 33 to 23 divorces per 1,000 marriages, a decrease of around 30 percent.

& # 39; For this generation, they are likely to get married if they get married & # 39 ;, Manning predicts.

She warned that although marriage and divorce rates are lower for millennials, they still form relationships.

& # 39; It's not like they are alone in their parents' basements & # 39 ;, she said. & # 39; The millennials are still forming relationships – they are cohabiting and maybe that will dissolve, and then they will marry. & # 39;

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Medieval ranges representing Generation X have undergone few changes over time. The divorce rate for the 35-44 year-olds was 9 percent lower and for those 45-54 the divorce rate was 15 percent higher.

Bowling Green researchers calculated the annual divorce rates for girls and women aged 15 and over by dividing the number divorced in the last 12 months by the number divorced in the last 12 months plus the number currently married and then the result by 1,000 to multiply.

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