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Fifteen Gallic amphora were found half under water in the sand and were first seen by two divers outside the city of Portofino at the end of November last year

Good luck! Divers unearth the sunken remains of 2,000-year-old Gallic amphora at the bottom of the Mediterranean Sea

  • Fifteen Gallic amphora were found half underwater in the seabed
  • It is thought that one will be beaten, but the rest will remain intact and be recovered
  • Archaeologists hope to study the pots to find out more about their past
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A catch of 2,000 years old pottery has been discovered on the seabed of the Mediterranean.

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Fifteen Gallic amphoras were found half submerged in the sand and were first seen by two divers outside the city of Portofino at the end of November last year.

Archaeologists have now begun to take the pottery out of the waters for further study.

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Fifteen Gallic amphora were found half under water in the sand and were first seen by two divers outside the city of Portofino at the end of November last year

Fifteen Gallic amphora were found half under water in the sand and were first seen by two divers outside the city of Portofino at the end of November last year

Edoardo Sbaraini and Gabriele Succi, from Santa Margherita Ligure, Italy, found the old pots and immediately informed the local Ministry of Antiquities.

The first ceramic jug was taken from the ocean floor on January 10, 2019.

Footage made by the divers shows the old pots lying 164 feet (50 meters) below the surface.

Most of them are perfectly intact, but one has been crushed and became home to a range of marine animals, including two lobsters.

Mr. Sbaraini said: “Thanks to our underwater scooters we were able to keep a broad overview of the waters outside of Portofino, and we found the amphora in a place where divers normally do not come.

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& # 39; The first thing you notice is that the necks and the flat bottoms of some pots stand out.

One of the pots is supposed to be smashed, but the rest remains intact and is salvaged. The broken pot turned out to be the home of two divers' lobsters

One of the pots is supposed to be smashed, but the rest remains intact and is salvaged. The broken pot turned out to be the home of two divers' lobsters

One of the pots is supposed to be smashed, but the rest remains intact and is salvaged. The broken pot turned out to be the home of two divers' lobsters

Edoardo Sbaraini and Gabriele Succi, from Santa Margherita Ligure, Italy, found the old pots and immediately informed the local Ministry of Antiquities. The first ceramic jug was taken from the ocean floor on January 10, 2019

Edoardo Sbaraini and Gabriele Succi, from Santa Margherita Ligure, Italy, found the old pots and immediately informed the local Ministry of Antiquities. The first ceramic jug was taken from the ocean floor on January 10, 2019

Edoardo Sbaraini and Gabriele Succi, from Santa Margherita Ligure, Italy, found the old pots and immediately informed the local Ministry of Antiquities. The first ceramic jug was taken from the ocean floor on January 10, 2019

Footage made by the divers shows the old pots lying 164 feet (50 meters) below the surface. Divers said: & # 39; The first thing we noticed was the necks and flat bottoms of some pots that emerged from the sand & # 39;
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Footage made by the divers shows the old pots lying 164 feet (50 meters) below the surface. Divers said: & # 39; The first thing we noticed was the necks and flat bottoms of some pots that emerged from the sand & # 39;

Footage made by the divers shows the old pots lying 164 feet (50 meters) below the surface. Divers said: & # 39; The first thing we noticed was the necks and flat bottoms of some pots that emerged from the sand & # 39;

According to Mr. Sbaraini, one of the divers who found the trek for the first time, new statements from the Ministry of Antiquities are expected to appear next week to shed more light on the exact origins of the relics

According to Mr. Sbaraini, one of the divers who found the trek for the first time, new statements from the Ministry of Antiquities are expected to appear next week to shed more light on the exact origins of the relics

According to Mr. Sbaraini, one of the divers who found the trek for the first time, new statements from the Ministry of Antiquities are expected to appear next week to shed more light on the exact origins of the relics

& # 39; When we realized what we had found, we were shocked, it is every diver's dream to find historical remains and for us it was an incredible experience.

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& # 39; We have told the Soprintendenza (Department of Antiquities) about the pots and they were actually on the spot the same day. & # 39;

According to Mr. Sbaraini, new declarations from the Ministry of Antiquities are expected in the coming weeks to shed more light on the precise origins of the relics.

Mr. Sbaraini said: & The archaeologists are just as enthusiastic about these findings as we are.

& # 39; They said it is a very unique event and they have taken one of the amphora out of the water to use it as a monster and study it. & # 39;

WHEN HAS THE ROMANS Occupied BRITTANIA?

55BC – Julius Caesar crossed the canal with around 10,000 soldiers. They landed on a beach in Deal and were met by a group of British. Caesar was forced to withdraw.

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54BC – Caesar crossed the channel with 27,000 infantry and cavalry. Again they arrived at the deal, but they were unhindered. They marched inland and after heavy battles they defeated the British and surrendered the most important tribal chiefs.

Later that year, however, Caesar had to return to Gaul to solve problems and the Romans left.

54BC – 43BC – Although no Romans were present in Britain during these years, their influence increased due to trade relations.

43AD – A 40,000 Roman troop led by Aulus Plautius landed in Kent and took the southeast. The Emperor Claudius arrived in Colchester with reinforcements. Claudius appointed Plautius the governor of Great Britain and returned to Rome.

In 43AD a Roman force (artist & # 39; s impression) of 40,000 landed under the leadership of Aulus Plautius landed in Kent and took the southeast. The Emperor Claudius then arrived in Colchester with reinforcements

In 43AD a Roman force (artist & # 39; s impression) of 40,000 landed under the leadership of Aulus Plautius landed in Kent and took the southeast. The Emperor Claudius then arrived in Colchester with reinforcements

In 43AD a Roman force (artist & # 39; s impression) of 40,000 landed under the leadership of Aulus Plautius landed in Kent and took the southeast. The Emperor Claudius then arrived in Colchester with reinforcements

47AD – Londinium (London) was founded and Great Britain was declared part of the Roman Empire. Networks of roads were built throughout the country.

75 – 77AD – Romans defeated the last resistant strains, making all Britons Roman. Many Britons began to adopt Roman customs and legislation.

122AD – Emperor Hadrian ordered that a wall be built between England and Scotland to keep Scottish tribes out.

312AD – Emperor Constantine made Christianity legal throughout the Roman Empire.

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228AD – The Romans were attacked by barbarian tribes and soldiers stationed in the country began to be recalled to Rome.

410AD – All Romans were recalled to Rome and Emperor Honorious told Britons that they no longer had any connection with Rome.

Source: History on the net

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