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Disturbing video shows mink tearing at fur farms in Lithuania

Minks ‘crazy about captivity’ attack each other and eat each other in Lithuanian fur farming, according to images of animal rights activists.

Video, marked ‘horrible’ by animal rights activists, also shows that the animals in distress jump up and down in small cages and a mink torn in two.

Campaign group Open Cages made the recordings last year to emphasize the plight of minks that have been bred for their fur in the Eastern European country and throughout industry.

The hair-raising images were filmed by Open Cages animal rights group at Fur Farms in Lithuania. Above is a mink that tears in the flesh of its cagemate

The hair-raising images were filmed by Open Cages animal rights group at Fur Farms in Lithuania. Above is a mink that tears in the flesh of its cagemate

Mink were also filmed with open wounds and in one case cut in half in their cage (above)

Mink were also filmed with open wounds and in one case cut in half in their cage (above)

Mink were also filmed with open wounds and in one case cut in half in their cage (above)

In one heart-wrenching scene, a mink is shown wrapped in a ball with all the fur from his back and sides scratched, while in another, multiple are shown with matted fur.

Flocks of flies are also shown around the mink dirty cages that measure 11 x 35 inches.

Mink babies were also depicted on each other on a wire floor for warmth and scrambling over each other’s bodies in tight conditions. Bodies were also shown on the farms that were found to be blown up by decomposition.

“Annoying circumstances such as these occur surprisingly often in the fur industry,” Open Cages CEO Connor Jackson told MailOnline. “But there is no excuse for this level of animal abuse.”

“We call on State Secretary for the Environment Theresa Villiers to commit to address this issue as the Labor Party did; use Brexit as an opportunity to ban the sale of fur in the UK. “(Do it) before more animals lose their lives to this outdated industry.”

The animals were also depicted with matted fur. Open Cages CEO Connor Jackson said there is “no excuse for this level of animal abuse”

These minks had their legs and arms chewed by his cage mates. It is not clear whether this animal died before or after it was attacked

These minks had their legs and arms chewed by his cage mates. It is not clear whether this animal died before or after it was attacked

These minks had their legs and arms chewed by his cage mates. It is not clear whether this animal died before or after it was attacked

One mink was huddled in his cage with fur torn from his back. It can rub against the side of the cage due to stress

One mink was huddled in his cage with fur torn from his back. It can rub against the side of the cage due to stress

One mink was huddled in his cage with fur torn from his back. It can rub against the side of the cage due to stress

The video also includes footage from a fur farmer from 2016, never before published in the UK, who described how mink behaved on farms.

“They’re always exactly like that,” she says after seeing clips of the mink jumping up and down in their cages. “It seems to be due to stress.”

“We see these wounds when the cubs are small,” she says, referring to cuts on the animal bodies.

“We threw the food and it sometimes falls on their ears. They lick it off and it makes these wounds. “

The UK banned fur farming in 2000, but continued to allow the import of real fur products.

In 2017 alone, almost £ 75 million worth of animal fur, including mink, was imported.

A dead baby mink is depicted lying on top of a cage. The UK banned fur farming in 2000 but continued to allow the import of real fur products. According to government figures, almost £ 75 million was granted to the country in 2017

A dead baby mink is depicted lying on top of a cage. The UK banned fur farming in 2000 but continued to allow the import of real fur products. According to government figures, almost £ 75 million was granted to the country in 2017

A dead baby mink is depicted lying on top of a cage. The UK banned fur farming in 2000 but continued to allow the import of real fur products. According to government figures, almost £ 75 million was granted to the country in 2017

A mink depicted lying in a cage after his head was removed. FurLithuania, representing fur farms in the country, said it was shocked by the “unacceptable scenes” and “had never seen anything like it”

A mink body depicted on the floor of the cage. It seems to be blown up by dissolution

A mink body depicted on the floor of the cage. It seems to be blown up by dissolution

A mink body depicted on the floor of the cage. It seems to be blown up by dissolution

A study has recently shown that real fur products are still being sold in stores where they are banned after real fur handbags, jackets, and hats were discovered for sale in T.K. Maxx.

More than two-thirds of British public support for banning fur animals has been revealed by the Humane Society International UK.

FurLithuania, which represents fur farms in the country, said it was shocked by the “unacceptable scenes” in the video and had never seen anything like it.

They added that neither the Lithuanian Breeders’ Association, which has worked in the sector for decades, nor the Lithuanian National Veterinary Agency had ever viewed this before.

“Keeping untreated injured animals is a crime,” they said, “so any person who notices it must report it to the police or the national veterinary agency.”

The mink were depicted sandwiched in small cages. They may have been built on a renovated Soviet farm before the collapse of the country in 1991

The mink were depicted sandwiched in small cages. They may have been built on a renovated Soviet farm before the collapse of the country in 1991

The mink were depicted sandwiched in small cages. They may have been built on a renovated Soviet farm before the collapse of the country in 1991

A group of baby mink gathered for warmth at a fur farm in Lithuania

A group of baby mink gathered for warmth at a fur farm in Lithuania

A group of baby mink stood together for warmth at a fur farm in Lithuania

Flies were also filmed humming through the fur farms. The infections can happen when no dirt is collected and the summer temperatures rise

Flies were also filmed humming through the fur farms. The infections can happen when no dirt is collected and the summer temperatures rise

Flies were also filmed humming through the fur farms. The infections can happen when no dirt is collected and the summer temperatures rise

Two minks stare sadly from their cages at animal rights activists who visit a fur farm

Two minks stare sadly from their cages at animal rights activists who visit a fur farm

Two minks stare sadly from their cages at animal rights activists who visit a fur farm

“The office of the Lithuanian Attorney General has already begun investigations following our legal statement on the origin of the similar video footage distributed by the empty cage NGO in 2018.

“If a mink’s death occurs on the farm, it is recorded in the special journal and the bodies must be safely placed in a refrigerator and later transported to the utility company. Nobody throws dead animals around the farm. “

The farms where the graphic images were made may have been filmed in a renovated former Soviet farm, which exists everywhere in Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia.

Minking repeatedly in cages is a “very rare phenomenon,” FurLithuania claimed, before claiming that sudden noise could scare the animals and cause the movements.

It added that minks depicted in the cages are not wild predators, which have been domesticated and kept in cages for more than a century.

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