Dingo who has robbed the 14-month-old baby must be euthanized but can never be found

Ranger claims to Dingo that the 14-month-old baby could never be found – as the locals warn of attacks WILL continue to happen while tourists camp in unsafe areas

  • Rangers are willing to euthanize the dingo that has robbed and attacked a baby
  • Locals warn that the attacks will continue if tourists camp in unsafe places
  • At least two animals understood to have entered the caravan on Fraser Island
  • The boy's parents woke up with the child being dragged through the head
  • An emergency helicopter arrived on Friday morning at about 2.30 a.m.

Rangers are willing to euthanize the dingo that has stolen and attacked a 14-month-old baby, but says it may never be found because the locals are warning that attacks on the island will continue.

A 14-month-old boy underwent surgery after being dragged early by his family from his family's caravan on Fraser Island in Queensland on Friday morning.

Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service has since sent dingo rangers to the island to talk to witnesses and identify the animal responsible for the attack.

A 14-month-old boy underwent surgery after being dragged early on Friday morning by his family's caravan on Fraser Island in Queensland

A 14-month-old boy underwent surgery after being dragged early on Friday morning by his family's caravan on Fraser Island in Queensland

The boy was treated by paramedics stationed on the island before a RACQ LifeFlight helicopter arrived around 2.30 am on Friday

The boy was treated by paramedics stationed on the island before a RACQ LifeFlight helicopter arrived around 2.30 am on Friday

The boy was treated by paramedics stationed on the island before a RACQ LifeFlight helicopter arrived around 2.30 am on Friday

Lead rider Daniel Clifton said they would consider euthanizing the dingo, but without an expert witness or photo it would be difficult to track it down.

& # 39; Euthanasia is an option that has been applied in the past, but that is certainly an option that we will not take lightly … it is done with all the information collected and in consultation with the Butchulla traditional owners also & # 39 ;, he told The Weekend Australian.

It is believed that at least two wild dogs have jammed a clip on the side of the motorhome before they enter and attack the baby.

The boy's parents woke up with the screams when one of the dingoes dragged the boy outside.

Rescue personnel said the father pursued the wild dogs in nearby bushland and fought them against the toddler before calling paramedics.

The boy was treated by paramedics stationed on the island before a RACQ LifeFlight helicopter arrived around 1.40 am on Friday.

The victim was bleeding heavily but was in a stable condition at the Hervey Bay hospital in the morning. He was later transferred to the Queensland Children & # 39; s Hospital in Brisbane.

The toddler suffered a broken skull, pierced wounds on his neck and head and cut his legs, scalp and body in the attack

The toddler suffered a broken skull, pierced wounds on his neck and head and cut his legs, scalp and body in the attack

The toddler suffered a broken skull, pierced wounds on his neck and head and cut his legs, scalp and body in the attack

The boy was bleeding heavily but was in a stable condition in the Hervey Bay hospital in the morning. He was later transferred to the Queensland Children & # 39; s Hospital in Brisbane

The boy was bleeding heavily but was in a stable condition in the Hervey Bay hospital in the morning. He was later transferred to the Queensland Children & # 39; s Hospital in Brisbane

The boy was bleeding heavily but was in a stable condition in the Hervey Bay hospital in the morning. He was later transferred to the Queensland Children & # 39; s Hospital in Brisbane

He suffered a fractured skull, punctured wounds in his neck and head and cut his legs, scalp and body in the attack.

The locals warn tourists not to camp in unfenced areas with children under 12 years old and urge more information to be made available.

Long-term Fraser Island resident Hannah Robinson said there was not enough public information available to be safe on the island.

She told The Sydney Morning Herald that this meant that more attacks were inevitable.

& # 39; Every year more and more people come to the island and there is just not enough education & # 39 ;, Robinson said.

Locals warn tourists not to camp in unfenced areas with children under 12 years old and urge more information to be made available (stock image)

Locals warn tourists not to camp in unfenced areas with children under 12 years old and urge more information to be made available (stock image)

Locals warn tourists not to camp in unfenced areas with children under 12 years old and urge more information to be made available (stock image)

& # 39; People who do the wrong thing are naive or stupid. People just take a permit and come here without being prepared. This is not the kind of place to do that; you have to come up with a plan. & # 39;

If dingoes can be identified after an attack, they are euthanized by nature services.

But Robinson warned that dingoes are essential to the local ego system and must be preserved.

& # 39; We lose 10 to 15 dingoes every year and it is such a shame. it's really important to keep them here, they're a top predator and we have a wild cat population, & she said.

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