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A dingo (photo) that has been wrongly taken by a family who thought he was a dog when he was put down by an eagle in their backyard is actually a rare endangered species

Dingo fell into a backyard by an eagle and adopted by a woman who thought he was a dog turned out to be an extremely rare alpine species

  • DNA testing showed that a puppy that was dropped by an eagle in a backyard is in danger
  • Wife discovered him in August, with a lot on social media who said it was a fox
  • Tests showed that the animal is an Australian dingo in the Alps, almost extinct
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A woman who thought she had found a puppy in her backyard to hear later that he was a dingo who had fallen there by an eagle, has now learned that he is an extremely rare species.

The resident in Bright, in northeastern Victoria, woke up one evening in August with the sound of the puppy yelling in her back yard.

She brought him in, but after pressure from friends who thought the animal looked like a dingo, she took him for testing.

The tests not only showed that the animal she called Wandi was a dingo – but he is also part of a rare, endangered species.

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A dingo (photo) that has been wrongly taken by a family who thought he was a dog when he was put down by an eagle in their backyard is actually a rare endangered species

A dingo (photo) that has been wrongly taken by a family who thought he was a dog when he was put down by an eagle in their backyard is actually a rare endangered species

Tests from the University of New South Wales have confirmed that Wandi is an Australian dingo in the Alps – threatened with extinction and hunting.

The number of alpine dingos left in the wild is unknown.

Wandi could now become part of the breeding program at the Australian Dingo Foundation.

Lyn Watson, director of the foundation, said: "For us, he becomes a very valuable little thing, depending on his final development and the way he continues to interact with everyone else in the sanctuary,"

The Wandiligong family in Victoria mistakenly thought the dingo was a dog and called it Wandi
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The Wandiligong family in Victoria mistakenly thought the dingo was a dog and called it Wandi

The Wandiligong family in Victoria mistakenly thought the dingo was a dog and called it Wandi

She added that the pup's injuries strongly indicated that he had fallen there by an eagle.

& # 39; We believe that Wandi was stolen by an eagle and fell because he had sustained wounds on his back and his nails were worn, suggesting that he had traveled far on foot before being found, & # 39; wrote the foundation.

The dingo is Australia's only native dog and is protected in national parks under the Nature Conservation Act 1992.

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There are three types of purebred dingo & # 39; s – inland and tropical, alpine – and the alpine species is the only one that is endangered.

In some areas of Queensland, however, they are classified as a pest.

Most dingos in Australia are hybrids mixed with dogs, with potential extinction of purebred dingos predicted since 2011.

Wandi (photo) was sent to the reception center of the Australian Dingo Foundation, where employees tested her DNA

Wandi (photo) was sent to the reception center of the Australian Dingo Foundation, where employees tested her DNA

Wandi (photo) was sent to the reception center of the Australian Dingo Foundation, where employees tested her DNA

ALPINE DINGO FROM AUSTRALIA

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The dingo is the largest mammalian carnivore in Australia and there are three types.

Dingoes have a dog-like appearance, with a relatively broad head and upright ears.

Dingo & # 39; s rarely cry and bark. They usually cry at night to ward off intruders or attract packs.

They are opportunistic carnivores and usually feed on other mammals such as rabbits, kangaroos, wallabies and wombats.

Pure dingo & # 39; s breed once a year, between March and June, with a gestation period of approximately nine weeks.

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Tropical dingo & # 39; s come from the Kimberley and Plbara areas, domestic dingo & # 39; s live in deserts and central parts of the country, and Wandi & # 39; s type is the alpine dingo.

The alpine dingo is the breed that is most worrying because it is considered very endangered.

Alpine dingo & # 39; s can be found in the eastern coastal areas, where 80 percent of Australia's population lives.

The habitat of the alpine dingo is declining, while the persecution of the animal also drives the dingo close to extinction.

Source: Australian Museum

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