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Dietitian Leanne Ward reveals what it REALLY took to get her body into the shape she wanted

A dietician has revealed what it really took to gain abs and why it’s almost impossible to maintain them in the long run.

Leanne Ward, 30, from Brisbane, said she’s gained defined abs in the past after “ three or four months ” of hard work, but if you want to keep them, the sacrifice is huge.

“If your goal is visible abs, chances are you won’t be able to sustain it for the long haul,” Leanne posted to her Instagram next to a photo of her in a bikini.

She added that she “doesn’t look like this right now” so you shouldn’t necessarily strive for perfection, as it’s often an unattainable goal.

A dietitian has revealed what it really took to gain abs, and why it's nearly impossible to maintain them in the long run (Leanne Ward introduced herself when she had abs)

A dietitian has revealed what it really took to gain abs, and why it’s nearly impossible to maintain them in the long run (Leanne Ward introduced herself when she had abs)

Leanne (pictured) said it took three or four months to drastically cut her calories and exercise five or six times a week without ever eating a meal during that time

Leanne (pictured) said it took three or four months to drastically cut her calories and exercise five or six times a week without ever eating a meal during that time

Leanne (pictured) said it took three or four months to drastically cut her calories and exercise five or six times a week without ever eating a meal during that time

What is ‘cutting’ and ‘bulking’?

* Cutting means eating fewer calories than you burn to lose weight.

* Bulking means that you eat more calories than you burn in a day to build muscle.

* These terms are often used in the fitness industry by people who want to lose weight and build muscle.

Source: Good Life Fitness

“This photo was taken after a three to four month period of ‘healthy’ cutting with whole foods and the highest possible calories,” said Leanne.

The lowest number of calories the 30-year-old dietitian said she reached every day was 1,550 calories – which is dangerously low for her six-foot frame.

“I was so hungry every day that I refused to cut back, but for me it was untenable,” said Leanne.

She added that she wants her followers to know that “visible abs aren’t always equal to health or happiness.”

To gain abs, Leanne revealed that she “hadn’t had alcohol or a meal in months.”

“I did five or six gym sessions a week, walked 10,000 or more steps every day, and followed and weighed everything I ate,” she said.

For daily gym classes, Leanne had to focus on different parts of the body every day, including arms and abs, chest and back, and lower body.

“If this doesn’t sound nice to you (because it really wasn’t), I would suggest you consider the” goals “you have for yourself and consider if the last 2-5 kg ​​is really worth it , “the dietician said.

The lowest number of calories the 30-year-old dietician said she reached every day was 1,550 calories - which is dangerously low for her six-foot frame (Leanne shown)

The lowest number of calories the 30-year-old dietician said she reached every day was 1,550 calories - which is dangerously low for her six-foot frame (Leanne shown)

The lowest number of calories the 30-year-old dietician said she reached every day was 1,550 calories – which is dangerously low for her six-foot frame (Leanne shown)

Today, the dietitian said she prefers a healthy and balanced day of eating with lots of complex carbohydrates and snacks (a day is depicted on Leanne's plate)

Today, the dietitian said she prefers a healthy and balanced day of eating with lots of complex carbohydrates and snacks (a day is depicted on Leanne's plate)

Today, the dietitian said she prefers a healthy and balanced day of eating with lots of complex carbohydrates and snacks (a day is depicted on Leanne’s plate)

If you want to lose weight healthily, Leanne said you should think about eating with a calorie deficit.

“You don’t have to be on a crazy diet, you just have to have a calorie deficit,” she said.

This means that you eat fewer calories than you burn, whether you are doing this by cutting down 100-200 calories a day or increasing the intensity of your workouts.

“Food is king, movement is queen and together they form a perfect kingdom,” added Leanne.

“For some genetically gifted individuals, they can have abs without exercising, but most of us need very low body fat (point nutrition) and resistance training combined with some kind of HIIT / cardio / steps.”

Leanne (photo) previously shared some of the biggest health and nutrition myths, including the fact that one eating style works for everyone

Leanne (photo) previously shared some of the biggest health and nutrition myths, including the fact that one eating style works for everyone

Leanne (photo) previously shared some of the biggest health and nutrition myths, including the fact that one eating style works for everyone

Earlier, Leanne revealed some of the biggest health and nutrition myths.

She said the biggest diet myth out there is that one diet or eating style works for everyone:

“Don’t be fooled into thinking that what worked for your friend, neighbor, or colleague works for you,” she told Daily Mail Australia.

“At work, people often ask me how much I weigh or how many calories I eat, but it doesn’t matter at all.

“I’m 1.83 meters tall, so what I eat will be very different from someone 1.53 meters tall. We are all individuals, and if one way of eating or one macro distribution worked for everyone, we wouldn’t have an obesity crisis. ‘

If you want to lose weight, Leanne said nutrition is king and exercise is queen (a week of her typical daytime meals is pictured)

If you want to lose weight, Leanne said nutrition is king and exercise is queen (a week of her typical daytime meals is pictured)

If you want to lose weight, Leanne said nutrition is king and exercise is queen (a week of her typical daytime meals is pictured)

Leanne’s best tip is to see a professional:

If you’re exercising and wondering what your macro distribution should be, book a sports dietitian. Instead of googling or asking your friend what they do, invest in your health and refer to someone who has studied it for four years. ‘

She also recommends making time for your health and fitness:

“We all live such busy and fast lives that we never find the time to do anything.

“Most of us get exhausted at the end of each day, order takeaway and pass out on the couch.

“I encourage women to see health and fitness as an investment in their health – an investment in their future. If you are ill, make time to make an appointment with the doctor. Think also of health and fitness.

“Schedule your training in your diary as an important work meeting you wouldn’t miss and schedule some time on Sunday to prepare meals because it will save you so much time during the week and minimize the need to eat out.”

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