Did the mushrooms tunnel through these red gems?

For a long time, garnets are appreciated for their impeccable interiors and their decorative value, but it seems that living microorganisms may also have valued them as a place to live.

The experts discovered strange tunnel-like patterns within the gemstones, which are used in rings and necklaces, which they believe may have been created by a mushroom shape.

This is not the first time that creatures make their way into wood, stone and even bones to make their home, eating through the material.

However, this type of behavior is highly unusual in something as dense as a garnet, the researchers explained.

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Garnets have been prized for their impeccable interiors and decorative value, but it seems that live microorganisms may also have valued them as a place to live. The experts discovered strange tunnel-like patterns within the precious stones, which are seen here as black marks

Garnets have been prized for their impeccable interiors and decorative value, but it seems that live microorganisms may also have valued them as a place to live. The experts discovered strange tunnel-like patterns within the precious stones, which are seen here as black marks

Scientists at the University of Southern Denmark made the discovery by studying garnet crystals they discovered in fluvial sediments and soils in Thailand.

One explanation for the marks could be the presence of grains of other minerals, however, the hardness of garnet means that diamonds and sapphires are the only candidates strong enough to penetrate the gemstone.

Since these are not often found in the same region, the researchers dismissed them as a possibility.

This was confirmed when they opened the red gems to find traces of organic compounds inside the tunnel structures, suggesting that something had been living inside them.

The patterns they discovered connecting the tunnels reinforced this belief, suggesting that they were at least partially formed by endoliths.

According to the researchers, this type of behavior is highly unusual in something as dense as a garnet. This image shows a close-up of the patterns they discovered, which the team believes were formed by endoliths, organisms that live inside the rocks or in the pores between the mineral grains.

According to the researchers, this type of behavior is highly unusual in something as dense as a garnet. This image shows a close-up of the patterns they discovered, which the team believes were formed by endoliths, organisms that live inside the rocks or in the pores between the mineral grains.

WHAT ARE ENDOLITHS AND WHERE DO THEIR HOMES?

Endoliths are organisms that live inside rocks or in pores between mineral grains.

It is believed that these creatures were found in a wide range of environments, from rocks on the surface of the Earth to miles below the surface.

There are thousands of known species of endoliths, including types of bacteria, archaea and fungi.

Endoliths are organisms that live inside rocks or in pores between mineral grains. This image of a rock-eating endolith was taken from a basalt found 0.75 miles (1.2 km) below the floor of the Indian Ocean

Endoliths are organisms that live inside rocks or in pores between mineral grains. This image of a rock-eating endolith was taken from a basalt found 0.75 miles (1.2 km) below the floor of the Indian Ocean

Many endoliths are autotrophic, meaning they are able to produce their own organic compounds by using dissolved gas or nutrients from water that moves through fractured rocks.

Others may incorporate inorganic compounds found in their rock substrate, possibly excreting acids to dissolve the rock.

Endoliths have been found in a variety of environments, from the surface surface to the crust of the earth and deep ocean.

Endoliths are a type of extremophile, which is an organism that thrives in difficult conditions.

Endoliths are a microbial life form that specializes in living within another material, either by digging and eating through or moving into existing holes and cavities.

There are thousands of known species of endoliths, including types of bacteria, archaea and fungi.

The team believes that a form of fungal endolith is the most likely candidate for the tunnels they discovered in garnets.

Speaking to the New York Times, Magnus Ivarsson, who led the study, said: "There is basically no mineral grain that can be driven through a garnet like that."

Whether the body digs these tunnels or is not less clear, says the team.

The team believes that a form of fungal endolith is the most likely candidate for the tunnels they discovered in garnets. These images show microscopic images of the tunnels

The team believes that a form of fungal endolith is the most likely candidate for the tunnels they discovered in garnets. These images show microscopic images of the tunnels

The shape of the tunnels, examined under various types of microscopes, does not completely rule out a non-biological process at work.

That said, certain characteristic features of the endolithic lairs, such as the anastomoses, that connect passages between adjacent tunnels, suggest that they were formed, at least partially, by endolithic microbes.

The team believes that weathering in garnet provides initial surface areas that fungal endoliths can colonize.

In iron-poor sediments such as those studied here, garnets represent a rare source of iron for microbes that oxidize iron.

This encourages the fungal endoliths to go deeper, using a chemical process not yet identified.

"I think there's a two-step process, a superficial weathering, then an agency takes over," Dr. Ivarsson told the NYT.

Confirming the identity of the tunnel drillers will require observations of living organisms in a laboratory setting in subsequent tests.

In a written statement, Dr. Ivarsson added: "The tunnel system reported in garnets represents a new endolithic habitat in a hard silicate mineral that is otherwise known to be resistant to abrasion and chemical attack."

The full findings of the study were published in the journal PLOS One.

WHAT ARE THE OLDEST FUNGI THAT HAVE BEEN DISCOVERED?

For many years, fungi were grouped or confused with plants.

It was not until 1969 that they were officially granted their own "kingdom," along with animals and plants, although their distinctive features had been recognized much earlier.

Yeast, mold and fungi are all fungi, as are many forms of large mushroom-like organisms that grow in humid forest environments and absorb nutrients from dead or living organic matter.

Unlike plants, fungi do not have photosynthesis, and their cell walls lack cellulose.

Geologists studying lava samples taken from a drilling site in South Africa have discovered fossilized gas bubbles, which contain what could be the first fossil traces (in the image) of the branch of life to which humans belong. once unearthed

Geologists studying lava samples taken from a drilling site in South Africa discovered fossilized gas bubbles, which contained what might be the first fossil footprints (in the image) of the branch of life to which humans once belong. unearthed

Geologists who studied lava samples taken from a drilling site in South Africa discovered fossilized gas bubbles at 800 meters (2,600 feet) underground.

In April 2017, they revealed that they are believed to contain the oldest fungi that have been found.

The researchers examined samples taken from rock holes buried underground when they found the 2,400-million-year-old microscopic creatures.

It is believed that they are the oldest fungi found in about 1.2 billion years.

Earth itself is 4.6 billion years old.

The Earth itself is 4,600 million years old and the first previous examples of eukaryotes (the "overwritten" of life that includes plants, animals and fungi, but not bacteria) date back 1,900 million years. Fossils have thin filaments grouped like brooms (pictured)

The Earth itself is 4,600 million years old and the first previous examples of eukaryotes (the "overwritten" of life that includes plants, animals and fungi, but not bacteria) date back 1,900 million years. Fossils have thin filaments grouped like brooms (pictured)

They could be the earliest evidence of eukaryotes: the "over-domain" of life that includes plants, animals and fungi, but not bacteria.

The first previous examples of eukaryotes (the "over-kingdom" of life that includes plants, animals and fungi, but not bacteria) dates back 1.9 billion years. That makes it shows 500 million years more.

It was believed that fungi first emerged on earth, but the newly discovered organisms lived and thrived under an old oceanic seabed.

And the dating of the finding suggests that these fungus-like creatures not only lived in a dark and cavernous world without light, but also lacked oxygen.

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