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A property developer who has received a $ 1.7 million house for free under the bizarre Cracker Rights Law has offered the property for sale

Property developer who received a $ 1.7 million house in Sydney for FREE under the bizarre & # 39; squat rights & # 39; law is about to collect money when he offers the property for sale

  • Bill Gertos ran into the premises in 1998 in Ashbury, the inner-west of Sydney
  • He moved after learning from an older woman who had previously lived their deceased
  • Gertos claimed the $ 1.7 million home under the bizarre cracker rights law
  • The project developer has now offered the three-bedroom house for sale
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A property developer who has received a $ 1.7 million house for free under the bizarre Cracker Rights Law has offered the property for sale.

Bill Gertos came across the modest home in 1998 when he opened a customer on Ashbury Street in the southwest of Sydney.

After he learned that the older woman who lived in the house had died, Mr. Gertos decided to claim ownership of the three-bedroom property as his own.

A property developer who has received a $ 1.7 million house for free under the bizarre Cracker Rights Law has offered the property for sale

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A property developer who has received a $ 1.7 million house for free under the bizarre Cracker Rights Law has offered the property for sale

But instead of tackling his mission with traditional means, Mr. Gertos simply changed the locks and started renovating.

He became the owner of the Ashbury House this year after winning a case before the Supreme Court.

Gertos claimed that the house according to a law requiring a & # 39; squat & # 39; can be considered as the owner of a property if they have lived there for more than 12 years.

The legal battle goes back to November 2017, when the Downie family heard that their relative Henry Thompson Downie had bought the house in 1927.

The family has not disputed Mr Gertos' property.

The house on Malleny Street is listed by Paul Errichiello, director of Mint Property Agents.

Bill Gertos came across the modest home in 1998 when he opened a customer on Ashbury Street in the southwest of Sydney
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Bill Gertos came across the modest home in 1998 when he opened a customer on Ashbury Street in the southwest of Sydney

Bill Gertos came across the modest home in 1998 when he opened a customer on Ashbury Street in the southwest of Sydney

He became the owner of the Ashbury House this year after successfully winning a case before the Supreme Court

He became the owner of the Ashbury House this year after successfully winning a case before the Supreme Court

He became the owner of the Ashbury House this year after successfully winning a case before the Supreme Court

Located in a quiet cul-de-sac, the & # 39; Federation facade & # 39; a new interior and the possibility to expand.

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It is close to parks, schools, and Ashfield and Canterbury train stations.

Mr. Errichiello declined to comment on the circumstances of the sale when he was contacted by The Daily Telegraph.

But property records reveal that the smart developer was trying to sell the house for around $ 1.45 million.

WHAT ARE & # 39; SQUATTER & # 39; S RIGHTS & # 39 ;?

The time period for how long a squat has to live on a property before it has rights to it varies between states and territories in Australia.

In South Australia, squatting is illegal, but squatters can request ownership if they can prove that they have lived in the property for 15 years without the owner's permission.

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In Victoria, squatters can apply for property after having lived in a house for 15 years, while in Queensland, NSW and Western Australia the time frame is 12 years.

The law dates back to 1900 in NSW and was originally aimed at communities where a large number of people were illiterate, said legal expert Cathy Sherry ABC.

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