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Struggling farmers are forced to find work abroad after their crops failed at home due to the severe drought in Australia (photo: Adrian Brown & # 39; s farm in Gravesend, NSW)

Desperate Australian farmers move abroad to find work while devastating drought destroys their own cattle and crops

  • Farmers take jobs to harvest bumper crops in the US and Canada
  • Wrestler Adrian Brown is one of many who will work abroad
  • Brown said he has resorted to foreign countries because of unaffordable bills
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Struggling farmers move abroad to find work after the severe drought in Australia has destroyed their crops.

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Many have started harvesting bumper crops in the southern US and Canada because of the increasing bills that they can no longer afford.

Adrian Brown, who owns an 1800-hectare farm in Gravesend in northern New South Wales, is one of many farmers who have accepted work abroad to make ends meet.

The Brown family farm has only received 10 mm of rain since the end of June and was forced to sell half of its cattle after trying to keep the animals alive.

Struggling farmers are forced to find work abroad after their crops failed at home due to the severe drought in Australia (photo: Adrian Brown & # 39; s farm in Gravesend, NSW)

Struggling farmers are forced to find work abroad after their crops failed at home due to the severe drought in Australia (photo: Adrian Brown & # 39; s farm in Gravesend, NSW)

Adrian Brown (photo), who owns an 1800-hectare farm in Gravesend in northern New South Wales, is one of many farmers who have accepted work abroad to make ends meet
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Adrian Brown (photo), who owns an 1800-hectare farm in Gravesend in northern New South Wales, is one of many farmers who have accepted work abroad to make ends meet

Adrian Brown (photo), who owns an 1800-hectare farm in Gravesend in northern New South Wales, is one of many farmers who have accepted work abroad to make ends meet

& # 39; It is difficult to see that some crops that we had planted for feed fail and die. But the most difficult part was having to sell the majority of our breeding stock, & Mr. Mrs. Brown said 9News.

& # 39; Twelve months ago we had around 4,000 sheep and 200 head of cattle. The number of sheep is now less than half and there are only nine cows left. & # 39;

According to the Bureau of Meteorology, the drought in Australia is the most serious ever recorded.

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No fewer than 94 percent of New South Wales was hit by the drought from September.

Parts of the country have been placed under severe water restrictions due to the paralyzing drought.

Residents in Sydney, the Blue Mountains and Illawara can be fined $ 220 – and businesses $ 550 – for using a garden hose between 10 AM and 4 PM.

In southern Queensland, residents are limited to just 100 liters of water per day.

According to the Bureau of Meteorology, the drought in Australia is the most serious ever recorded

According to the Bureau of Meteorology, the drought in Australia is the most serious ever recorded

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According to the Bureau of Meteorology, the drought in Australia is the most serious ever recorded

In 2016, Mr Brown's farm was covered with the best green barley crops they had ever grown (photo)

In 2016, Mr Brown's farm was covered with the best green barley crops they had ever grown (photo)

In 2016, Mr Brown's farm was covered with the best green barley crops they had ever grown (photo)

& # 39; We are eight months behind us and would not have had 15 percent of our annual average rainfall & # 39 ;, said Brown.

& # 39; The rain that we have received has come far enough apart in small doses to do nothing at all. & # 39;

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In 2016, Mr Brown's farm was covered with the best green barley crops they had ever grown.

Three years later, his farm looked almost dried out without a successful crop in sight.

Three years later, Mr. Brown's farm looked almost dehydrated without a successful crop in sight

Three years later, Mr. Brown's farm looked almost dehydrated without a successful crop in sight

Three years later, Mr. Brown's farm looked almost dehydrated without a successful crop in sight

Sydney's dam levels had fallen by 50 percent for the first time in 12 years after the highest temperatures of 20 and early 30 in the first week of spring.

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Mr. Brown said that he was just about giving up weather forecasts & # 39; has given up and is just trying to stay & # 39; positive & # 39 ;.

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