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Depression, loneliness and anxiety rise in BAME people during Covid-19 lockdown

BAME individuals are more likely than white people to become depressed, lonely and anxious during Covid-19 lockdown, research shows

  • 17 percent of whites report being often lonely while incarcerated
  • This figure rises to about 23 percent among those with a BAME background
  • BAME people have also reported lower levels of happiness and life satisfaction

Black, Asian and ethnic minorities (BAME) have been hardest hit by the psychological impact of the Covid-19 pandemic, a study shows.

An ongoing study conducted by University College London (UCL) has been monitoring the psychological side effects of lockdown.

People with a BAME background have been found to experience higher levels of depression and anxiety during the Covid-19 lockdown.

The same people have also reported lower levels of happiness and life satisfaction, as well as a greater chance of being lonely.

BAME individuals are also more concerned about unemployment and financial stress than those of white ethnic groups, data suggest.

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Ongoing research from University College London (UCL) is monitoring the psychological side effects of lockdown.  It was found that BAME individuals experienced higher levels of depression and anxiety during the Covid-19 lockdown (stock)

Ongoing research from University College London (UCL) is monitoring the psychological side effects of lockdown. It was found that BAME individuals experienced higher levels of depression and anxiety during the Covid-19 lockdown (stock)

Lead author, Dr. Daisy Fancourt said, “Our research shows that people with a BAME background experience more negative effects of lockdown than people with a white background.

‘This is especially true for direct and indirect psychological problems.

These findings may be due to ethnic inequalities in the UK, with people with a BAME background statistically more likely to fall into risk categories for adverse experiences during the pandemic, such as lower family income and poorer basic mental health.

“Differences in experiences and inequalities themselves may also be due to individual and systemic racism, an issue that has been highlighted in recent weeks by Black Lives Matter protests.”

Thoughts of death and actual self-harm also plague the BAME communities more than whites, the UCL researchers found.

Seventeen percent of whites in the study of 70,000 people say they felt lonely at some point during the coronavirus lock.

This figure rises to 23 percent for individuals with a BAME background.

UCL maintains a social study during the pandemic to map out how people in the UK are coping. It is currently in the 15th week.

There is a clear difference in how people of different backgrounds deal with the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic, but some factors have remained consistent across all demographics.

BAME people have also reported lower levels of happiness and life satisfaction, as well as an increased chance of being lonely.  BAME individuals are also more concerned about unemployment and financial stress than those of white ethnic groups, data suggest (stock)

BAME people have also reported lower levels of happiness and life satisfaction, as well as an increased chance of being lonely.  BAME individuals are also more concerned about unemployment and financial stress than those of white ethnic groups, data suggest (stock)

BAME people have also reported lower levels of happiness and life satisfaction, as well as an increased chance of being lonely. BAME individuals are also more concerned about unemployment and financial stress than those of white ethnic groups, data suggest (stock)

Only one in three British people are still concerned about the capture of COVID-19

British people are slowly less worried about catching the coronavirus, a study shows.

One in three adults (35 percent) admit they are currently concerned about an infection with COVID-19, while only 15 percent say they are seriously concerned.

This shows a clear shift in the public psyche, as at the beginning of the shutdown – nearly three months ago – half of the British were afraid of catching the virus.

Concerns about Covid-19 capture and access to food are not varied based on background, culture or skin color.

However, BAME groups have 14 percent less confidence in the government than whites.

Meanwhile, BAME groups’ confidence in the NHS is also lower.

This lack of confidence in those responsible for lockdown measures and treatment is far from surprising, as recent statistics show that BAME people are more likely to contract and die from Covid-19.

A June report published by Public Health England (PHE) revealed that Britons of Bangladeshi ethnicity had about twice the risk of white Britons dying with the coronavirus.

And it showed that black people, as well as those from Chinese, Indian, Pakistani, other Asian or Caribbean backgrounds, had a 10 to 50 percent higher risk of death after they tested positive for the disease.

Cheryl Lloyd, head of the Nuffield Foundation’s curriculum, said, “ We know that people of some ethnic minority groups have higher mortality and infection rates than people of white ethnic groups, and these findings show that this also applies when it comes to reporting poor mental health, even though fear levels of catching Covid-19 are similar between the ethnic groups compared in this report.

“To try to understand the reasons for these differences, it is important to take into account the other ways in which people from ethnic minority groups are disproportionately affected by the pandemic, for example by more often working in health and social care, and, especially for men, more often work in closed sectors.

“There will also be notable differences between different ethnic minority groups in relation to their experience of the pandemic.”

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