Denim, large glasses and MANY hair spray! American shoppers from the 80s

A new book has collected a series of photos that capture the last days of the great shopping mall culture of the 1980s.

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Six years after the publication of his book Malls Across America, Michael Galinsky is back with a new book, The Decline of Mall Civilization.

The book, which was funded through Kick starter and will be released at the end of November, with previously unseen images taken by Galinsky in 1989 when he was sophomore at NYU.

Michael Galinsky's new book, The Decline of Mall Civilization, contains a new series of photos that he took as a student

Michael Galinsky's new book, The Decline of Mall Civilization, contains a new series of photos that he took as a student

Galinsky took the photos when he studied in 1989. They emphasized the days when people came to shopping centers

Galinsky took the photos when he studied in 1989. They emphasized the days when people came to shopping centers

Galinsky took the photos when he studied in 1989. They emphasized the days when people came to shopping centers

Galinsky said he traveled to 15 shopping centers for a month. The photos were part of a photography project at a university
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Galinsky said he traveled to 15 shopping centers for a month. The photos were part of a photography project at a university

Galinsky said he traveled to 15 shopping centers for a month. The photos were part of a photography project at a university

While tile floors, artificial plants and brightly lit shops are still recognizable features of shopping malls to date, customer hairstyles and fashion reveal the era in which these photos were taken

While tile floors, artificial plants and brightly lit shops are still recognizable features of shopping malls to date, customer hairstyles and fashion reveal the era in which these photos were taken

While tile floors, artificial plants and brightly lit shops are still recognizable features of shopping malls to date, customer hairstyles and fashion reveal the era in which these photos were taken

Galinsky said he thought of & # 39; as something of a privatized public square & # 39; and & # 39; focused on people and the way they interacted with each other and the space & # 39;

Galinsky said he thought of & # 39; as something of a privatized public square & # 39; and & # 39; focused on people and the way they interacted with each other and the space & # 39;

Galinsky said he thought of & # 39; as something of a privatized public square & # 39; and & # 39; focused on people and the way they interacted with each other and the space & # 39;

At the time, he spent a month traversing the United States and photographing American shopping malls – and the people inside – at every stop for a university project.

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& # 39; In 1989, I was a sophomore and was a major in religious studies who attended many anthropology and sociology courses, allowing me to think of the mall in complex ways & # 39 ;, Galinsky wrote on Kickstarter.

& # 39; I was particularly interested in the shopping mall as something of a privatized public square. While concentrating on people, I thought about the way they interacted with each other and with space. & # 39;

Galinsky said his tour of the mall began in Columbus, Ohio, where there was no mall. In the end, however, they found a mall in Detroit, the Woodfield Mall, which Galinsky described as & # 39; a beauty and there are probably a dozen in the book by. & # 39;

All in all, Galinsky said he had hit 15 shopping centers during his photographic shopping tour.

Unlike his original book with a shopping mall theme, The Decline of Mall Civilization is almost completely double pages on which the photos of each other are played back & # 39 ;.

Galinsky used Kickstarter to fund the new book, titled The Decline of Mall Civilization and released in November
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Galinsky used Kickstarter to fund the new book, titled The Decline of Mall Civilization and released in November

Galinsky used Kickstarter to fund the new book, titled The Decline of Mall Civilization and released in November

A recording made in an unknown shopping center where a woman and a young boy are seen talking to an employee of a shopping center

A recording made in an unknown shopping center where a woman and a young boy are seen talking to an employee of a shopping center

A recording made in an unknown shopping center where a woman and a young boy are seen talking to an employee of a shopping center

Here a woman is seen walking through a record store. Classic Madonna albums dominate the sales racks

Here a woman is seen walking through a record store. Classic Madonna albums dominate the sales racks

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Here a woman is seen walking through a record store. Classic Madonna albums dominate the sales racks

These photos show different moments during a day in the mall, where people are seen fixing and kissing their hair

These photos show different moments during a day in the mall, where people are seen fixing and kissing their hair

These photos show different moments during a day in the mall, where people are seen fixing and kissing their hair

In an excerpt from the original book, Malls Across America, Galinsky writes that his photography professor at the University of New York encouraged him to travel through the country after seeing photos taken at the local mall in Garden City, Long Island.

In 1989, he embarked on a road trip to the west coast with a friend, and by the time they arrived in San Francisco, they had visited more than a dozen malls and more second-hand stores and antique stores.

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While tile floors, artificial plants and brightly lit shops are still recognizable features of shopping malls to date, customer hairstyles and fashion reveal the era in which these photos were taken.

An overhead photo reveals people moving around the mall or just hanging out in the temperature-controlled room

An overhead photo reveals people moving around the mall or just hanging out in the temperature-controlled room

An overhead photo reveals people moving around the mall or just hanging out in the temperature-controlled room

This image shows customers of a store in an unknown shopping center, called A Touch of Class

This image shows customers of a store in an unknown shopping center, called A Touch of Class

This image shows customers of a store in an unknown shopping center, called A Touch of Class

Here a boy walks through a shopping mall, dressed in what was then fashion

Here a boy walks through a shopping mall, dressed in what was then fashion

Here a boy walks through a shopping mall, dressed in what was then fashion

This image of people riding an escalator is one of the many new candid shots that appear in the new Galinsky book

This image of people riding an escalator is one of the many new candid shots that appear in the new Galinsky book

This image of people riding an escalator is one of the many new candid shots that appear in the new Galinsky book

One of the photos of his journey shows two teenage boys playing the old-fashioned arcade game Golden Ax, with shopping carts and a brightly lit shop window in the background.

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With their hair worn in mullet styles and their T-shirts in their high-waisted jeans, these guys look every inch like the typical late 1980s teenagers.

Mr. Galinsky told Today.com in 2011 that the period is just as important as the physical setting of his photos.

& # 39; At the time, the shopping mall was the new public space, the new community center where people would work together.

& # 39; This was pre-internet, pre-mobile, there was smoking in shopping malls, it was before the Gulf War. It was this weird moment in time where things were ready to change. & # 39;

One of the most striking aspects of the images is indeed the lack of mobile phones, iPads and other technology that play such a large role in our lives today.

Galinsky was only 20 when he started driving through the country in 1989 and took these pictures of shopping centers in different states for an art project at the university
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Galinsky was only 20 when he started driving through the country in 1989 and took these pictures of shopping centers in different states for an art project at the university

Galinsky was only 20 when he started driving through the country in 1989 and took these pictures of shopping centers in different states for an art project at the university

This candid image shows two young children left alone to take a nap after a tiring day at the mall

This candid image shows two young children left alone to take a nap after a tiring day at the mall

This candid image shows two young children left alone to take a nap after a tiring day at the mall

Another detail that reveals that these photos are remnants of the past is that various subjects smoke in the mall.

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In such a photo, a woman sits on a couch puffing on a cigarette while children play at a water feature in the lobby of a shopping mall.

The signs for stores such as Tape World and Musicland also reveal a bygone era, just like the boxy televisions that are sold in one of the stores.

Of course the style of the people in these images is the most obvious indication that they come from a not so distant past.

In a particularly vintage-looking photo, a man in a tight Coca Cola T-shirt rushes through the corridors of a shopping mall, his black leather and shaving jacket hanging from his shoulders.

His dark hair is short at the front and longer at the back, and he enhances his look with gold chains around his neck.

Another photo shows a woman embracing a young boy, both dressed in oversized tie-dye T-shirts and white sneakers.

A young girl in a pink T-shirt and black overall looks from the corner of the frame and holds several hugs tightly against her chest.

Galinsky says that one of the groundbreaking moments on his road trip was when he visited a shopping mall in St. Louis, Missouri, and he realized it was identical to a visit to Vancouver, Washington.

& # 39; It was a completely surreal experience to walk through that space & # 39 ;, he says. & # 39; Even the & # 39; Restaurants & # 39; in the food court were the same. This was America. & # 39;

On the website of Steidl, the company that publishes the book, a description of the theme & # 39; s of the photo series is discussed in more detail.

& # 39; Shopping malls across America is filled with seemingly lost or concerned families making their way through these temples of consumerism, along with playful teenagers, misfits and the elderly & # 39 ;, it says.

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& # 39; There is a sense of claustrophobia in the images, even in images that indicate broad commercial spaces – there is always a wall or ceiling to block the horizon.

& # 39; These photos never settle or focus on any detail, creating the feeling that they are stolen records of the most direct kind. & # 39;

Mr. Galinsky launched a Kickstarter campaign in 2011 to raise money to publish his photo album.

He explained on his Kickstarter page that, although he had no idea that the images would arouse such interest today, part of their intrigues is the mystery of where each photo was taken.

& # 39; It was hard to tell from the images where they were taken, and that was actually the point, & # 39; he writes. & # 39; I was interested in the insidious loss of regional differences. & # 39;

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