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The act was captured on CCTV overlooking an Adelaide doorstep (pictured)

Delivery driver is captured on camera destroying what he thought was a swastika outside a customer's home – but the case of mistaken identity has left the owners devastated

  • The man was caught on CCTV destroying what he thought was a Nazi symbol
  • The image was actually a Hindu symbol representing peace and prosperity
  • The wife of Nijesh Hirpara spent three hours making it from colored sand
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Homeowners were left distraught after a postman destroyed what he thought was a swastika reminiscent of Nazi Germany on their suburban porch, but it was actually a Hindu symbol of peace.

The act was captured on CCTV overlooking the doorstep of Nijesh Hirpara or Valley View, north east of Adelaide, on Monday.

Footage showed the delivery man walking up the stairs to the home Mr Hirpara shares with his wife, letters in hand.

The act was captured on CCTV overlooking an Adelaide doorstep (pictured)

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The act was captured on CCTV overlooking an Adelaide doorstep (pictured)

After knocking on the door, the man appeared believe the homeowners were out.

He could be seen looking around for checkers, before quickly swiping and destroying the intricate design made from colored sand with his foot.

The man then walked briskly away.

The artwork, called a Rangoli, took Mr. Hirpara's wife three hours to assemble.

Mr. Hirpara told 7 News he believes the man lacks the symbol for a symbol of neo-Nazis.

The artwork, called a Rangoli, Mr. Hirpara's wife took three hours to assemble (pictured)

The artwork, called a Rangoli, Mr. Hirpara's wife took three hours to assemble (pictured)

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The artwork, called a Rangoli, Mr. Hirpara's wife took three hours to assemble (pictured)

"I think it's very important to distinguish between red swastika symbol of the Hindu religion and the symbol of neo-Nazis," he said.

The man got used to explaining that the symbol is found in almost every Hindu household, and it's often used to inaugurate new cars.

"We can easily be targeted because most people don't know the real roots of the swastika," he said.

Mr Hirpara said he believes the man mistook the symbol for a symbol of neo-Nazis (pictured: the destroyed symbol of peace)

Mr Hirpara said he believes the man mistook the symbol for a symbol of neo-Nazis (pictured: the destroyed symbol of peace)

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Mr Hirpara said he believes the man mistook the symbol for a symbol of neo-Nazis (pictured: the destroyed symbol of peace)

Mr Hirpara decided not to report the man to police.

He said he believed the best way to help people understand is to educate them, rather than punish them.

"We don't expect the world to change immediately, so let's be a little careful with it and start raising awareness."

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