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Declassified CIA UFO reports reveal 1952 Project Blue Book meeting

A treasure trove of newly-unsealed CIA records has revealed chilling accounts of hundreds of UFO sightings across the globe dating back to the 1950s – along with the international intelligence community’s efforts to understand them.  

A dossier with nearly 3,000 pages of documents about Unidentified Aerial Phenomena (UAPs) – the government’s official term for what are commonly called UFOs – was published on The Black Vault website last week.  

Thousands of paranormal enthusiasts have already started poring through the collection of more than 700 individual documents, according to Black Vault’s founder John Greenewald Jr, who has spent the past two decades suing the CIA to release the records and then scanning the pages into his database one by one.  

The CIA purports that the files account for its ‘entire’ collection of declassified UAP intel, but Greenewald cautions that there’s no way to verify that claim and has vowed to continue searching for further records.  

The dossier was released ahead of a June deadline for US intelligence agencies to reveal everything they know about UFOs to Congress under a clause slipped into the $2.3trillion coronavirus relief bill signed into law by President Donald Trump in December.   

An ongoing DailyMail.com review of the files has uncovered a bevy of perplexing accounts of mysterious disks tracking across the sky, spewing beams of light across small towns, causing explosions and even a few claims of military officers confronting aliens that come out of outlandish vehicles.  

The documents also show correspondence about UFO sightings between CIA officers and members of the military. Sometimes the officials brush off observers’ stories as purely superstitious, even when another explanation isn’t clear. But in other instances the officers show genuine concern that perhaps something dangerous is at play. 

One of the earliest records describes a 1952 meeting where top US intelligence and military officials discussed forming a coalition to study an alarming increase in UFO sightings. That coalition, led by the Air Force and dubbed Project Blue Book, would go on to review thousands of sightings at home and abroad to determine whether there was a reason to fear something other than America’s Cold War enemies.  

A treasure trove of newly-unsealed CIA records has revealed chilling accounts of hundreds of UFO sightings across the globe dating back to the 1950s - along with the international intelligence community's efforts to understand them. Pictured: A photo from the Project Blue Book archive shows lights misidentified as a group of UFOs over a Coast Guard air station in Salem, Massachusetts in 1952

A treasure trove of newly-unsealed CIA records has revealed chilling accounts of hundreds of UFO sightings across the globe dating back to the 1950s – along with the international intelligence community’s efforts to understand them. Pictured: A photo from the Project Blue Book archive shows lights misidentified as a group of UFOs over a Coast Guard air station in Salem, Massachusetts in 1952

US Military Branch Chiefs meet to discuss the CIA’s ‘Flying Saucers’ project in 1952 

On August 11, 1952, a group of US military leaders got together to discuss the CIA’s plans to launch a research project on ‘flying saucers’. 

Minutes from the meeting were included in a report the Black Vault dossier, describing how the CIA wanted to run the project through its Physics & Electronics Division after a sudden uptick in UFO sightings around the world. 

The document was annotated by an unidentified individual who put brackets around different figures at the meeting and added a few notes in the margin. 

On August 11, 1952, a group of US military leaders got together to discuss the CIA's plans to launch a research project on 'flying saucers'. Minutes from the meeting were included in a report the Black Vault dossier, describing how the CIA wanted to run the project through its Physics & Electronics Division after a sudden uptick in UFO sightings around the world. The document (pictured) was annotated by an unidentified individual who put brackets around different figures at the meeting and added a few notes in the margin

On August 11, 1952, a group of US military leaders got together to discuss the CIA's plans to launch a research project on 'flying saucers'. Minutes from the meeting were included in a report the Black Vault dossier, describing how the CIA wanted to run the project through its Physics & Electronics Division after a sudden uptick in UFO sightings around the world. The document (pictured) was annotated by an unidentified individual who put brackets around different figures at the meeting and added a few notes in the margin

On August 11, 1952, a group of US military leaders got together to discuss the CIA’s plans to launch a research project on ‘flying saucers’. Minutes from the meeting were included in a report the Black Vault dossier, describing how the CIA wanted to run the project through its Physics & Electronics Division after a sudden uptick in UFO sightings around the world. The document (pictured) was annotated by an unidentified individual who put brackets around different figures at the meeting and added a few notes in the margin

Under the meeting minutes there is a section for 'distribution'. A handwritten note states: 'Where so many "flying saucers" have been reported of late. Although Mr Strong knew many people there and tracked the area extensively, no unusual phenomena were ever mentioned or seen'

Under the meeting minutes there is a section for 'distribution'. A handwritten note states: 'Where so many "flying saucers" have been reported of late. Although Mr Strong knew many people there and tracked the area extensively, no unusual phenomena were ever mentioned or seen'

Under the meeting minutes there is a section for ‘distribution’. A handwritten note states: ‘Where so many “flying saucers” have been reported of late. Although Mr Strong knew many people there and tracked the area extensively, no unusual phenomena were ever mentioned or seen’

‘Mr Sullivan opened the meeting by saying that a project is to be started in the P&E Division on “Flying Saucers. It was suggested by Dr Odarenko that this project be set up to maintain the file to establish outside contacts on such matters and to build up to date knowledge of the [illegible] to permit the Division and office to take a stand and formulate an opinion as might be required,’ the document states. 

Astronomer J Allen Hynek, Project Blue Book's scientific consultant, is seen at an observatory in the 1960s

Astronomer J Allen Hynek, Project Blue Book's scientific consultant, is seen at an observatory in the 1960s

Astronomer J Allen Hynek, Project Blue Book’s scientific consultant, is seen at an observatory in the 1960s

It says that ATIC – which refers to the Air Technical Intelligence Center at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio – ‘has the job of finding out about these “flying saucers” and keeping records. [Illegible] is responsible for getting information for the CIA. All members of the P&E Division are to look into this project and see what they can contribute to this problem. Each Branch appointed a representative.’ 

Under the meeting minutes, transcribed with a typewriter, there is a section for ‘distribution’. A handwritten note states: ‘Where so many “flying saucers” have been reported of late. Although Mr Strong knew many people there  and tracked the area extensively, no unusual phenomena were ever mentioned or seen.’ 

The venture discussed during that meeting would go on to be called ‘Project Blue Book’, according to Air Force archives. It was the third project of its kind, following behind others called Grudge and Sign. 

There were two main goals to Project Blue Book: To determine if UFOs were a threat to national security; and to scientifically analyze UFO-related data.

The project was officially terminated in 1969 after the Condon Report, based on thousands of sightings compiled by the project, concluded that there was nothing abnormal about UFOs.  

One of the thousands of UFO sightings studied under Project Blue Book are shown above

One of the thousands of UFO sightings studied under Project Blue Book are shown above

Another photo from Project Blue Book's Condon Report is shown above

Another photo from Project Blue Book's Condon Report is shown above

Two of the thousands of UFO sightings studied under Project Blue Book are shown above 

Russian airliner crew describes coming within 50 kilometers of a yellow disk shooting beams of light in Belarus in 1985 

Many of the documents included in the Black Vault archive describe UFO sightings in the former Soviet Union – but this one is particularly detailed. 

An article from Moscow’s Trud newspaper dated January 30, 1985, describes how an airline crew en route from Rostov, Russia, to Tallinn, Estonia, came upon what they perceived to be a UFO about 120 kilometers from Minsk, Belarus, at about 4am.  

The article dramatically recounts the incident from the perspective of the crew. ‘Glancing over his portion of the sky, the copilot noticed a large star that was not flickering on his upper right. But this is no star, this yellow speck the size of a 5-kopeck coin, stretched out along the edges.

‘”No matter..,”‘ he told himself calmly, “refraction of light in the atmosphere or something else…” A very thin beam of light emerged from the speck and fell vertically down to the ground itself.’ 

The pilot nudged his three comrades in the cockpit and they watched as the ‘beam of light suddenly opened up, turning into a luminous cone. … A second cone emerged, wider, … then a third one, broad and quite bright.’ 

 The pilot recommended that they report the sight to the ground, but the commander stopped him, unsure of how they would even describe it.  

The men estimated that the object was only about 40 to 50 kilometers away. The copilot pulled out a paper to draw it before ‘the beam of the “projector” rose from the ground and focused on the aircraft.’

‘The commander was still hesitating: should he report what is taking place or not? But something that put an end to his doubts happened here. The white spot flashed up, and a green cloud emerged in its place.’

The commander recalled seeing the object rush toward his plane, before it suddenly disappeared. ‘Well, now they will say we weren’t in our right minds.’ 

The article goes on to describe the crew’s conversations with dubious ground controllers.  

It concludes with a statement from N. A. Zheltukhin, deputy chairman of the Commission on Aerodynamic Phenomena, who said: ‘The commission is conducting a systematic study of [UFO] sightings over the territory of the Soviet Union. 

‘However, we have to note that regrettably, all the accounts which we have at our disposal suffer from being one-sided or fragmentary to one degree or another.’ 

An article from Moscow's Trud newspaper dated January 30, 1985, describes how an airline crew en route from Rostov, Russia, to Tallinn, Estonia, came upon what they perceived to be a UFO about 120 kilometers from Minsk, Belarus

An article from Moscow's Trud newspaper dated January 30, 1985, describes how an airline crew en route from Rostov, Russia, to Tallinn, Estonia, came upon what they perceived to be a UFO about 120 kilometers from Minsk, Belarus

An article from Moscow’s Trud newspaper dated January 30, 1985, describes how an airline crew en route from Rostov, Russia, to Tallinn, Estonia, came upon what they perceived to be a UFO about 120 kilometers from Minsk, Belarus

 

Swedish pilot and flight mechanic spot a ‘completely unorthodox, metallic object’ flying at ‘the speed of sound’ outside Stockholm in 1953

A CIA report from April 1954 includes three newspaper articles about a purported UFO sighting five months earlier in Sweden. 

Captain Christiernsson and flight mechanic Olle Johansson were flying a Trasnair Airlines plane between Malmo and Stockholm on December 17, 1953, when the object appeared in the sky in front of them. 

‘I do not doubt for an instant that it was not a jet plane,’ Christiernsson told the Dagens Nyheter newspaper. ‘What I saw was a completely unorthodox, metallic, symmetric, round object which was unlike anything I have seen before.  

‘The silhouette was thin and it approached me at a very high velocity. Olle Johansson and I have discussed the matter of its speed, and we have estimated the speed to be about that of sound. The whole business took place fantastically quickly, but I believe that I was able to see the object for four to five seconds.’ 

Johansson said: ‘What I saw was an ellipse with sharp outlines and something between silver and white in color. It was approaching from the north in a direction opposite to ours, at a speed of about 1,200 kilometers per hour. It was flying entirely above the clouds. Since we had the automatic pilot on, we had no chance to turn quickly enough to see where the object went.’ 

But two days after the alleged sighting, a Swedish official contacted the newspaper and said that the object viewed by Christiernsson and Johansson was likely just one of the 300 advertising balloons that had been released earlier that day. 

‘With all certainty, it is one of our balloons which the flyers saw,’ Director Bertil Dahlstrom told Dagens Nyheter. 

A CIA report from April 1954 includes three newspaper articles about a purported UFO sighting five months earlier in Sweden. Captain Christiernsson and flight mechanic Olle Johansson were flying a Trasnair Airlines plane between Malmo and Stockholm on December 17, 1953, when the object appeared in the sky in front of them

A CIA report from April 1954 includes three newspaper articles about a purported UFO sighting five months earlier in Sweden. Captain Christiernsson and flight mechanic Olle Johansson were flying a Trasnair Airlines plane between Malmo and Stockholm on December 17, 1953, when the object appeared in the sky in front of them

A CIA report from April 1954 includes three newspaper articles about a purported UFO sighting five months earlier in Sweden. Captain Christiernsson and flight mechanic Olle Johansson were flying a Trasnair Airlines plane between Malmo and Stockholm on December 17, 1953, when the object appeared in the sky in front of them

 

Nine UFOs spotted hundreds of kilometers apart in the span of four hours in the Soviet Union in 1989

Nine different UFO sightings were reported around Russia on the same night in March 1989, according to a CIA document based on various reports from the Rabochaya Tribuna newspaper. 

The sightings all took place between 8pm and 12am on March 21, in the regions of Pereslavl-Zalesskiy, Novoselye, Zagorsk, Yakovlevo, Ploshevo, Dubki, Kablukovo, Fryazino and Kirzhach. Each of those regions are within about 600 kilometers of Moscow. 

The sighting in Pereslavl-Zalesskiy came from a radar observation post, which said: ‘A shining object with red lights at a range of about 40 kilometers, moving at a speed many times greater than that of an aircraft, appeared at 21.19. A shining object with white lights and the same parameters was following it.’ 

Four captains and one colonel were quoted in the report – describing oblong objects with flashing lights and beams emanating out of them. 

The report states: ‘In an editor’s note, Rabochaya Tribuna assessed Colonel General Maltsev’s documents as “substantial confirmation” that UFOs, piloted by intelligent beings of some sort, have been visiting the USSR. ‘

Nine different UFO sightings were reported around Russia on the same night in March 1989, according to a CIA document based on various reports from the Rabochaya Tribuna newspaper

Nine different UFO sightings were reported around Russia on the same night in March 1989, according to a CIA document based on various reports from the Rabochaya Tribuna newspaper

Nine different UFO sightings were reported around Russia on the same night in March 1989, according to a CIA document based on various reports from the Rabochaya Tribuna newspaper

Urgent UFO information is hand-delivered to the CIA’s top scientist for review in 1976 

Asked about which documents had piqued his interest, Greenewald highlighted a report about seemingly urgent UFO information being hand-delivered to an Assistant Deputy Director for Science & Technology at the CIA in April 1976. 

Most details about the information were redacted in the document, but Greenewald said he is determine to uncover more through further FOIA requests. 

The name of the deputy director was also redacted but records indicate that Carl Duckett served in that position at the time.  

The document states: ‘We contacted A/DDS&T (Dr [redacted]) to see if he knew of any UFO program and also to answer the questions posed by [redacted]. 

‘Dr [redacted] exhibited interest in [redacted] which was handcarried to his office. After a short examination of its contents Dr [redacted] advised us that he would personally look into the matter and get back to us.’ 

A second document from June of 1976 appears to request an update on the review, but there is no record of the ordeal after that.  

The heavily redacted report above describes seemingly urgent UFO information being hand-delivered to an Assistant Deputy Director for Science & Technology in April 1976

The heavily redacted report above describes seemingly urgent UFO information being hand-delivered to an Assistant Deputy Director for Science & Technology in April 1976

The heavily redacted report above describes seemingly urgent UFO information being hand-delivered to an Assistant Deputy Director for Science & Technology in April 1976

CIA officials discuss the possibility that UFOs were behind a ‘mysterious blast’ in the small Russian town of Sasovo in 1991 

In another report, CIA officials discuss the possibility that UFOs were behind a ‘mysterious blast’ in the small Russian town of Sasovo – about 400 kilometers southwest of Moscow – in 1991. 

Residents reported seeing a ‘fiery sphere’ descend from the sky before a shockwave tore through the town, leveling an entire block. 

The report said investigators had failed to come to a conclusion about the cause of the explosion, leaving open the possibility of UFOs. 

It states: ‘Some people are talking about munitions left buried since the last war, while others claim that a powerful bomb fell. A third group blame it on a meteorite, and a fourth group blame UFOs… There are people who supposedly saw a moving “fiery sphere”.’ 

Among the more than 700 files in the Black Vault database is this report, where CIA officials discuss the possibility that UFOs were behind a 'mysterious blast' in a small Russian town

Among the more than 700 files in the Black Vault database is this report, where CIA officials discuss the possibility that UFOs were behind a 'mysterious blast' in a small Russian town

Among the more than 700 files in the Black Vault database is this report, where CIA officials discuss the possibility that UFOs were behind a ‘mysterious blast’ in a small Russian town

UFO enthusiast hounds the CIA for information about a sighting at Ohio Air Force Base 

Several of the files appeared to reference the same incident, in which a possible UFO was sighted at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio in 1978. 

The reports refer to someone named Dr Leon Davidson who made multiple requests for information about the matter and did not appear to be getting any response. 

He is believed to be the same Dr Leon Davidson who studied UFOs for decades beginning in 1949, according to Columbia University, which was gifted a collection of the engineer’s research on the subject after his death in 2007. 

One report states: ‘[Redacted] received a letter from Davidson [redacted] in which Davidson asked if the [redacted] tape had been analyzed at Wright Field.

‘[Redacted] replied that the tape was forwarded to proper authorities for evaluation and no information was available concerning results. 

‘[Redacted] then received a second letter dated 19 March from Davidson in which he said since [redacted] was not in a position to make enquires he would like the address of proper parties to make them to. 

‘[Redacted] replied that he understood the proper address for forwarding information on “flying saucers” is Air Technical Intelligence Center, Wright Patterson Air Force Base. 

‘Subsequently, [redacted] learned that Davidson made enquiries there. Apparently they stalled him.’

In May of that year another report asks: ‘What progress has been made? This correspondence is more than a month old. I am afraid the longer we procrastinate the more fuel we add to the fire. Also, the people at Wright Field are holding their breaths awaiting advice.’

A third report, for which the date is illegible, says: ‘Davidson is on our backs again. He wants a verbatim translation of the “space” message and the identification of the transmitter from which it came.’  

In a fourth report – which indicates that the case is ‘closed’ – the author states that Davidson was writing an article about the incident entitled: ‘The Air Force and the Saucers, Part Three: The Central Intelligence Agency becomes involved with Saucers.’

It indicates that the CIA did provide Davidson with some information, but does not disclose what that information was. 

In the final report on the matter, the author indicates that the CIA will no longer be responding to Davidson’s correspondence. 

Wright-Patterson AFB has long been linked to conspiracy theories about alien life, after serving as the headquarters of an Air Force program- dubbed ‘Project Blue Book’, which studied UFOs from 1947 to 1969.  

Over the course of those two decades the project garnered more than 12,600 reports of UFO sightings – 701 of which were never ‘identified’, according to the Dayton Daily News.  

Several of the files appeared to reference the same incident, in which a possible UFO was sighted at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio in 1978. The reports refer to someone named Dr Leon Davidson who made multiple requests for information about the matter and did not appear to be getting any response

Several of the files appeared to reference the same incident, in which a possible UFO was sighted at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio in 1978. The reports refer to someone named Dr Leon Davidson who made multiple requests for information about the matter and did not appear to be getting any response

Several of the files appeared to reference the same incident, in which a possible UFO was sighted at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio in 1978. The reports refer to someone named Dr Leon Davidson who made multiple requests for information about the matter and did not appear to be getting any response

In May of that year another report asks: 'What progress has been made?'

In May of that year another report asks: 'What progress has been made?'

In May of that year another report asks: ‘What progress has been made?’

A third report, for which the date is illegible, says: 'Davidson is on our backs again. He wants a verbatim translation of the "space" message and the identification of the transmitter from which it came'

A third report, for which the date is illegible, says: 'Davidson is on our backs again. He wants a verbatim translation of the "space" message and the identification of the transmitter from which it came'

A third report, for which the date is illegible, says: ‘Davidson is on our backs again. He wants a verbatim translation of the “space” message and the identification of the transmitter from which it came’

In a fourth report - which indicates that the case is 'closed' - the author states that Davidson was writing an article about the incident entitled: 'The Air Force and the Saucers, Part Three: The Central Intelligence Agency becomes involved with Saucers'

In a fourth report - which indicates that the case is 'closed' - the author states that Davidson was writing an article about the incident entitled: 'The Air Force and the Saucers, Part Three: The Central Intelligence Agency becomes involved with Saucers'

In a fourth report – which indicates that the case is ‘closed’ – the author states that Davidson was writing an article about the incident entitled: ‘The Air Force and the Saucers, Part Three: The Central Intelligence Agency becomes involved with Saucers’

In the final report on the matter, the author indicates that the CIA will no longer be responding to Davidson's correspondence

In the final report on the matter, the author indicates that the CIA will no longer be responding to Davidson's correspondence

In the final report on the matter, the author indicates that the CIA will no longer be responding to Davidson’s correspondence

UFO sighted in Morocco in 1976 

One of the most heavily-redacted documents reviewed by DailyMail.com is dated September 23, 1976, and features the words: ‘To immediate director – with personal request to investigate UFO sighted in Morocco.’ 

The full-page report is covered in 25 black lines that appeared to have been made directly with a pen. 

The report was first approved for release in February of 2010, a footnote indicates. 

One of the most heavily-redacted documents reviewed by DailyMail.com is dated September 23, 1976, and features the words: 'To immediate director - with personal request to investigate UFO sighted in Morocco'

One of the most heavily-redacted documents reviewed by DailyMail.com is dated September 23, 1976, and features the words: 'To immediate director - with personal request to investigate UFO sighted in Morocco'

One of the most heavily-redacted documents reviewed by DailyMail.com is dated September 23, 1976, and features the words: ‘To immediate director – with personal request to investigate UFO sighted in Morocco’

Many of the files are similarly redacted to remove nearly every little detail beyond the word UFO. 

Some in the mix merely mention the keywords ‘UFO’, ‘UAP’ or ‘extraterrestrial’ in the context of unrelated topics, offering little to no insight about the CIA’s overall knowledge about those keywords. 

For example, one document entitled ‘Hypervelocity Test Techniques Discussed’ describes a French study of a force which could be used to deflect UFOs – defined in the document as ‘undesired flying objects’ – not unidentified ones. 

Another document joined the pile because it features a newspaper column about a Bosnian fugitive, in which the author mocks the Pentagon’s failure to find the man despite ‘communicating regularly with extraterrestrial beings’. 

One document entitled 'Hypervelocity Test Techniques Discussed' describes a French study of a force which could be used to deflect UFOs - defined in the document as 'undesired flying objects' - not unidentified ones

One document entitled 'Hypervelocity Test Techniques Discussed' describes a French study of a force which could be used to deflect UFOs - defined in the document as 'undesired flying objects' - not unidentified ones

One document entitled ‘Hypervelocity Test Techniques Discussed’ describes a French study of a force which could be used to deflect UFOs – defined in the document as ‘undesired flying objects’ – not unidentified ones

Another document joined the pile because it features a newspaper column about a Bosnian fugitive, in which the author mocks the Pentagon's failure to find the man despite 'communicating regularly with extraterrestrial beings'

Another document joined the pile because it features a newspaper column about a Bosnian fugitive, in which the author mocks the Pentagon's failure to find the man despite 'communicating regularly with extraterrestrial beings'

Another document joined the pile because it features a newspaper column about a Bosnian fugitive, in which the author mocks the Pentagon’s failure to find the man despite ‘communicating regularly with extraterrestrial beings’

‘It was like pulling teeth’: Greenewald recounts the 20 years he’s spent fighting for access to CIA records on UFOs 

Black Vault's founder John Greenewald Jr (pictured) has spent the past two decades suing the CIA to release the records and then scanning the pages one by one

Black Vault's founder John Greenewald Jr (pictured) has spent the past two decades suing the CIA to release the records and then scanning the pages one by one

Black Vault’s founder John Greenewald Jr (pictured) has spent the past two decades suing the CIA to release the records and then scanning the pages one by one

Greenewald began investigating the US government’s research on UFOs when he was just 15 years old in 1996. 

He described his painstaking efforts to Motherboard on Monday, saying he filed countless Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests to unseal the records. 

‘Around 20 years ago, I had fought for years to get additional UFO records released from the CIA,’ Greenewald said.

‘It was like pulling teeth. I went around and around with them to try and do so, finally achieving it.

‘I received a large box, of a couple thousand pages, and I had to scan them in one page at a time.’

The dossier contains both the records that Greenewald requested and others that the CIA had already released publicly and compiled into a CD, which Black Vault purchased last year. 

In a blog post Greenewald noted that while the CIA claims it has released all of its UAP documents, there is no way to verify whether some documents may have been withheld.  

In a Twitter thread on Tuesday he explained how the records available on the CIA’s website are incomplete, despite the agency ‘giving the illusion’ that everything is there. 

He posted screengrabs of a CIA site search which produced 415 results for UFO-related FOIA requests – compared to the 713 files on the Black Vault.  

In a Twitter thread on Tuesday Greenewald explained how the records available on the CIA's website are incomplete, despite the agency 'giving the illusion' that everything is there

In a Twitter thread on Tuesday Greenewald explained how the records available on the CIA's website are incomplete, despite the agency 'giving the illusion' that everything is there

In a Twitter thread on Tuesday Greenewald explained how the records available on the CIA’s website are incomplete, despite the agency ‘giving the illusion’ that everything is there

Greenewald also emphasized how the CIA releases its records in a format that is far from user-friendly. 

‘The CIA has made it incredibly difficult to use their records in a reasonable manner,’ Greenewald told Motherboard.

‘They offer a format that is very outdated (multi page .tif) and offer text file outputs, largely unusable, that I think they intend to have people use as a “search” tool. 

‘In my opinion, this outdated format makes it very difficult for people to see the documents, and use them, for any research purpose. 

‘Researchers and curious minds alike prefer simplicity and accessibility when they look at data dumps such as these.’ 

Despite the inconvenience, Greenewald said thousands of people had already downloaded the archive on the first day it was posted on the Black Vault.  

He’s offering the archive for free but set up a Patreon account for anyone who wants to donate money to support his past and future efforts to uncover CIA records. 

‘Plain and simple, the public has a right to know,’ Greenewald said. 

‘When I began researching nearly 25 years ago at the age of 15, I knew there was something to this topic. Not because of viral internet hoaxes. Not because of back door meetings wherein I can’t tell you who, but I promise it was mind-blowing information. No, none of that. 

‘It was simply because of the evidence that I got straight from the CIA. And the NSA. And the Air Force. And the DIA. I feel I am achieving what I set out to do. Easy access, to important material, for people to make up their own minds on what is going on.’

Greenewald (pictured) began investigating the US government's research on UFOs when he was just 15 years old in 1996. His Black Vault database is the result of countless different Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests

Greenewald (pictured) began investigating the US government's research on UFOs when he was just 15 years old in 1996. His Black Vault database is the result of countless different Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests

Greenewald (pictured) began investigating the US government’s research on UFOs when he was just 15 years old in 1996. His Black Vault database is the result of countless different Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests

US intelligence faces six-month deadline to submit unclassified UFO report to Congress 

UFO detectives like Greenewald may soon have even more intel to sift through, with the upcoming deadline for US intelligence agencies to submit an unclassified report about ‘unidentified aerial phenomena’ to congressional intelligence and armed services committees.

The director of National Intelligence and the secretary of defense have just under six months to do so, after a stipulation in the ‘committee comment’ section of the Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 was included in the huge bill, according to CNN.

The Senate intelligence committee’s directive said that the report should be unclassified, but it can contain a classified annex. Therefore, it is unlikely to reveal the discovery of extra-terrestrial life reaching earth.

It does, however, state that the report must contain detailed analysis of UFO data and intelligence collected by the Office of Naval Intelligence, the Unidentified Aerial Phenomena Task Force and the FBI. 

Detail of ‘an interagency process for ensuring timely data collection and centralized analysis of all unidentified aerial phenomena reporting for the Federal Government’ must be included, and it should designate an official responsible for that process.

A spokesperson for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence confirmed the requirement for the report to the fact-checking website Snopes

Navy pilots believe they spotted a UFO just off the coast in Jacksonville in 2015 (pictured)

Navy pilots believe they spotted a UFO just off the coast in Jacksonville in 2015 (pictured)

Navy pilots believe they spotted a UFO just off the coast in Jacksonville in 2015 (pictured)

In April last year, the Pentagon released three short videos – one from 2004 and two from 2015 – that showed ‘unidentified aerial phenomena’, which had earlier been confirmed to be real by the US Navy. 

The videos, recorded by infrared cameras, showed what appeared to be unidentified flying objects quickly moving across the sky.

In the background of two of the videos, service members can be heard reacting as they watch the objects, with one speculating it could be a drone.

In August, the Pentagon announced that it was setting up a task force to investigate the objects, but it is still unclear what the objects are or where they came from.

Both Pentagon officials and members of Congress have been concerned about the appearance of unidentified objects flying over US military bases, with some suggesting the objects in the video could be drones collecting intelligence.

In June last year, the Senate Intelligence Committee voted to have the Pentagon and intelligence community provide public analysis of such encounters.

This is not the first time the Pentagon has investigated aerial encounters with UFOs, having previously studied recordings of such incidents as part of a classified program launched by former Senator Harry Reid, that has since been shut down.

That program was launched in 2007 and closed in 2012, the Pentagon says, after it decided there were higher priority areas that required funding.

.