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Rep. Hal Rogers, a Republican from Kentucky

Purdue Pharmaceuticals, the combatant manufacturer of Oxycontin, influenced World Health Organization guidelines on the use of opioids for their own benefit, according to a new Congress report.

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According to the Wednesday report, the WHO manual for 2011 and the 2012 guidelines for opioids were influenced by people with financial connections to Purdue Pharma.

& # 39; We have come to believe that Purdue has used its financial ties to successfully influence the content of the WHO guidelines & # 39 ;, said Katherine Clark, a Massachusetts democrat, and Hal Rogers, a republican from Kentucky, in a letter to the WHO health department. the United Nations.

& # 39; As a result, WHO is, in fact, promoting the chronic use of opioids, & # 39; the letter went on.

Rep. Hal Rogers, a Republican from Kentucky

Rep. Katherine Clark, a Massachusetts democrat

Rep. Katherine Clark, a Massachusetts democrat

Rep. Hal Rogers (left), a Kentucky Republican, and Katherine Clark (right), a Massachusetts democrat, released the report on Wednesday accusing Purdue of influencing WHO guidelines

This image from the conference report claims to show a network of financial ties and to influence the linking of Purdue to the WHO and to claim to have an impact on the WHO guidelines for opioids
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This image from the conference report claims to show a network of financial ties and to influence the linking of Purdue to the WHO and to claim to have an impact on the WHO guidelines for opioids

This image from the conference report claims to show a network of financial ties and to influence the linking of Purdue to the WHO and to claim to have an impact on the WHO guidelines for opioids

The report claims that WHO guidelines for prescribing opioids are suspiciously similar to the language of Purdue marketing material, such as the dubious claim that less than 1 percent of patients develop drug dependence.

The WHO material also contains the term & # 39; opiophobia & # 39; with regard to doctors who have an & # 39; unreasonable anxiety & # 39; opioid prescription.

According to the report, & # 39; opiophobia & # 39; a & # 39; marketing term devised by the opioid industry and often used by Purdue. & # 39;

The report, based on publicly available information, suggests that WHO guidelines were & # 39; influenced by many organizations and individuals known to have financial links with Purdue and other major opioid industry players. & # 39;

Clark said the report was compiled because the WHO did not change its guidelines after a 2017 letter from her, Rogers and other members of Congress, raised concerns that Purdue's international poor aggressive opioids were being marketed abroad.

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& # 39; We have received the most recent letter from Congress and are reviewing this point by point & # 39 ;, said WHO spokesman Christian Lindmeier in an email.

Purdue, who only works in the US, called the report an attempt to & # 39; slander & # 39; and noted that the US Food and Drug Administration has approved OxyContin as safe and effective for the treatment of chronic pain.

The Purdue Pharma head office can be seen in a file photo. The company denies the allegations in the report and says it is an attempt to defam & purdue & # 39;

The Purdue Pharma head office can be seen in a file photo. The company denies the allegations in the report and says it is an attempt to defam & purdue & # 39;

The Purdue Pharma head office can be seen in a file photo. The company denies the allegations in the report and says it is an attempt to defam & purdue & # 39;

The company said in a statement that the & # 39; report is full of inaccuracies & # 39; and added: & # 39; Purdue denies that the company and its independent affiliate MundiPharma have successfully and secretly influenced the outcome of the two WHO guidelines referred to in the report. & # 39;

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& # 39; Purdue is deeply concerned about the consequences of opioid abuse and addiction and we remain committed to simultaneously supporting pains that help patients in need and creating real solutions to this public health crisis & # 39 ;, "the company said.

The company also says that it makes potential conflicts of interest public and that it is transparent about its financial links with third parties.

A spokeswoman for Mundipharma, an international pharmaceutical company owned by the Sackler family, which also owns Stamford, Connecticut-based Purdue, said the company would not comment on the report.

A spokesperson for various members of the Sackler family also did not comment.

Opioids, a class of prescription painkillers and heroin and fentanyl, have become the leading cause of death in the United States in recent years and have been associated with more than 390,000 deaths in the country between 2000 and 2017.

Bottles of Purdue Pharma L.P. OxyContin medication is sitting on a pharmacy shelf in a file photo. The company faces allegations that link its drugs to the opioid crisis
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Bottles of Purdue Pharma L.P. OxyContin medication is sitting on a pharmacy shelf in a file photo. The company faces allegations that link its drugs to the opioid crisis

Bottles of Purdue Pharma L.P. OxyContin medication is sitting on a pharmacy shelf in a file photo. The company faces allegations that link its drugs to the opioid crisis

On average, 130 people die every day in the US from opioid overdoses, according to the latest government data.

Purdue and other drug makers and distributors face about 2,000 lawsuits from state, local, and tribal governments in the United States to hold them accountable for the crisis.

The lawsuits claim that Purdue aggressively promoted the use of his medications on more patients and in higher doses, while downplaying the risk of addiction.

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They also say that the company has pushed to use the medication for chronic pain when traditionally used for acute pain, such as after surgery, or for pain due to cancer or other terminal illnesses.

Members of Congress say that the company has tried to do the same all over the world.

& # 39; These are exactly the same strategies and it is frantic and frightening to see that the World Health Organizations have included these strategies & quot ;, Clark said in an interview.

JPMorgan lowers ties with the maker of OxyContin Purdue Pharma about its alleged role in the American opioid crisis

JPMorgan Chase & Co has broken ties with Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, because of its alleged role in the American opioid crisis.

The pharmaceutical company will have to find a new bank for cash flow management and invoices, a source near AFP said on Thursday.

The decision was made to prevent damage to JPMorgan's reputation from Purdue, the added source.

In March, JPMorgan reportedly told Purdue that it had six months to find another bank and it seems that Comerica Inc., based in Dallas, is taking its place.

JPMorgan Chase & Co has broken ties with Purdue Pharma, the pharmaceutical company and the maker of the addictive painkiller OxyContin, to prevent damage to its reputation

JPMorgan Chase & Co has broken ties with Purdue Pharma, the pharmaceutical company and the maker of the addictive painkiller OxyContin, to prevent damage to its reputation

JPMorgan Chase & Co has broken ties with Purdue Pharma, the pharmaceutical company and the maker of the addictive painkiller OxyContin, to prevent damage to its reputation

Purdue became a dominant force in the pharmaceutical industry, largely thanks to the blockbuster painkiller OxyContin.

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There are hundreds of lawsuits in various states, including Massachusetts and New York, against both Purdue and the owner, the Sackler family, who are accused of insisting on prescribing OxyContin despite knowing how addictive it is.

OxyContin was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1995 and was made available in 1996.

Medicine manufacturer Edwin Thompson told CBS 60 minutes that when the FDA approved the drug, it was based on research that showed it was effective for & # 39; short-term & # 39; use.

But in July 2001, the FDA changed the label and broadened OxyContin use for people with more moderate and long-term pain, such as arthritis.

According to a 2005 study from Washington University School of Medicine, by 2004, OxyContin became the most common abused prescription opioid.

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