Advertisements
Detectives tried repeatedly to get a confession from Ivan Milat in the hours before his death (photo: Milat in the interview room)

Detectives tried repeatedly to get a confession from Ivan Milat in the hours before his death (photo: Milat in the interview room)

Advertisements

Detectives tried repeatedly to get a confession from Ivan Milat in the hours before his death (photo: Milat in the interview room)

Horrifying deathbed interviews with Ivan Milat have been released, showing that Australia's worst serial killer tells detectives that he would not admit his crimes, even if they blame him & # 39; visit.

Milat, 74, was found guilty of killing seven people in the Balenglo State Forest, southern Sydney, in the 1990s and is suspected of killing dozens of others, but never made a confession.

In an attempt to close the families of his victims, detectives tried repeatedly to make him confess in the hours before his painful death from throat and stomach cancer on Sunday in Sydney's Long Bay prison – but Milat did not give anything away.

The police had kept silent about the content of the interviews and the tactics they used until they were revealed on Monday.

Investigators visited the suspected murderer in prison and in the hospital a total of eight times in the weeks before his death, but Milat remained nonchalant and largely silent.

Advertisements

A male detective was initially used to extract information about the location of some suspected victims from unresolved cases, but Milat refused to acknowledge the presence of the detective.

& # 39; Today, Ivan, it's a bit of a chat to see if we can shed some light and maybe get a little closure for some families out there, & # 39 ;, the detective heard in a video Monday broadcast by A Current Affair night.

Milat remained silent while the detective tried to appeal to the murderer's ego.

& # 39; I don't believe anyone is so decent that they would bury the knowledge and location of people's loved ones to the grave, & # 39; he said.

& # 39; The end result is that in three weeks or three months or how long you are on this earth after you are gone mate, and in the coming years after we are all gone, everyone will still believe that you were responsible. & # 39;

While being interviewed by a male detective, Milat remained silent (photo)

While being interviewed by a male detective, Milat remained silent (photo)

While being interviewed by a male detective, Milat remained silent (photo)

Ivan Milat (photo), 74, died of throat and stomach cancer on Sunday
Advertisements

Ivan Milat (photo), 74, died of throat and stomach cancer on Sunday

Ivan Milat (photo), 74, died of throat and stomach cancer on Sunday

Milat periodically pretended to be asleep during the interrogation.

Eventually, the 74-year-old got hot for two female detectives who claimed he didn't like & # 39; the attitude & # 39; from the male officer.

Milat was forced to watch a series of recorded interviews with the relatives of his victims in an attempt to make a confession, but he remained indifferent.

Advertisements

& # 39; What do you want me to pay attention to? & # 39; he asked.

& (39) (The families) only say what you expect from them – I don't feel sorry for them. Why should I feel sorry for them? & # 39;

He also linked the seven deaths of backpackers to the death of his mother and sister.

& # 39; (Death) always happens, & # 39; he said.

Or investigators believe he & # 39; intangible & # 39; was for him, he said.

Advertisements

& # 39; I know in my heart, for God or whatever, I am free … you know, happy with what I say, & # 39; said Milat.

Researchers visited Milat a total of eight times (photo) to try to get a confession

Researchers visited Milat a total of eight times (photo) to try to get a confession

Researchers visited Milat a total of eight times (photo) to try to get a confession

Speaking of the unsolved murders that the police suspected, Milat said: & You could blow me with a burner and I still couldn't tell you a word about one of those missing people. & # 39;

Milat, whose memory was described as & # 39; encyclopedic & # 39;, then continued to claim his innocence.

Advertisements

He said he was able to tell every detail of his case backwards, and often used this skill to explain and disprove the evidence against him that he had found with his family in the 1990s.

& # 39; He was cold to the end. Even when the videos were shown, there was no emotion, no empathy, just nothing, & an officer told the Daily Telegraph earlier.

Another senior police source added: & # 39; Different approaches were made and different people tried to get him to make recordings.

Milat (photo), whose memory was described as & # 39; encyclopedic & # 39 ;, always claimed innocence

Milat (photo), whose memory was described as & # 39; encyclopedic & # 39 ;, always claimed innocence

Milat (photo), whose memory was described as & # 39; encyclopedic & # 39 ;, always claimed innocence

& # 39; He has talked about some things, but not about confessions. & # 39;

The recordings after 10 Daily revealed that a few days before he died, Milat handed a sealed letter to his brother Bill to be opened after his death.

In a final insult to the Australians, Milat used the letter to ask the New South Wales government to pay for his funeral.

He also asked for his assets and legal documents to be handed over to his family, Network Ten reported on Monday.

& # 39; Please do not pay for my funeral services or contribute in any way & # 39 ;, wrote the 74-year-old.

Advertisements

& # 39; Corrective Services NSW to finance it all – a poor man's funeral or whatever. & # 39;

Today it was revealed that Milat (photo) used the letter to insist that the New South Wales government pay for his funeral

Today it was revealed that Milat (photo) used the letter to insist that the New South Wales government pay for his funeral

Today it was revealed that Milat (photo) used the letter to insist that the New South Wales government pay for his funeral

Bill Milat said to Ten on Monday: & # 39; It is the taxpayer who has placed him there (prison), so the taxpayer must pay. Corrective Services had it all that time, so Corrective Services can pay the bill. & # 39;

Ivan Milat signed the letter with his name and a small image of a figure with a halo above the word & # 39; innocent & # 39 ;.

Advertisements

Corrective Services said on Monday that the commissioner had not received any recent correspondence from Milat.

& # 39; Corrective Services NSW will under no circumstances pay for this funeral, & # 39; said a spokeswoman.

The cousin of the murderer Alistair Shipsey has also been a vocal supporter of his uncle.

& # 39; I'm glad he no longer has pain because of something he didn't do, he had fallen victim to lies and without evidence, & # 39; Shipsey told The Daily Telegraph.

His brother Bill Milat (photo) always believed that Milat was innocent

His brother Bill Milat (photo) always believed that Milat was innocent

The cousin of the murderer Alistair Shipsey (photo) has also been a vocal supporter of his uncle
Advertisements

The cousin of the murderer Alistair Shipsey (photo) has also been a vocal supporter of his uncle

His brother Bill Milat (left) and cousin Alistair Shipsey (right) always believed that Milat was innocent

Former detective Clive Small, who led Milat's investigation in the mid-1990s, said he believed Milat (depicted with a firearm) would confess

Former detective Clive Small, who led Milat's investigation in the mid-1990s, said he believed Milat (depicted with a firearm) would confess

Former detective Clive Small, who led Milat's investigation in the mid-1990s, said he believed Milat (depicted with a firearm) would confess

Only one member of the Milat family, Ivan's brother, Boris, has criticized the backpacker killer.

& # 39; He was dead to me long ago, & # 39; Boris told the 60 minutes of Channel Nine.

& # 39; This man is just an evil serial killer to the bone. & # 39;

Former detective Clive Small, who led the Milat investigation in the mid-1990s, told The Project why he never believed the man would confess.

& # 39; I never thought he would confess anything from the moment he was arrested, & # 39; said Mr. Small.

& # 39; The personality of Milat was in my opinion such that he thought he was the boss.

& # 39; He was in charge of everything he wanted to do or wanted, and the way he held that position was by keeping information to himself or keeping information that he knew other people would be interested in. & # 39;

Small then explained that the nation's most notorious serial killer believed that as long as he withheld information that others wanted, despite receiving seven consecutive life sentences for murder in 1996, he was in control.

Caroline Clarke (photo) was murdered by Ivan Milat together with traveling companion Joanne Walter

Caroline Clarke (photo) was murdered by Ivan Milat together with traveling companion Joanne Walter

Caroline Clarke (photo) was murdered by Ivan Milat together with traveling companion Joanne Walter

Anja Habschied (in the photo is one of the victims of backpacker killer Ivan Milat

Anja Habschied (in the photo is one of the victims of backpacker killer Ivan Milat

Simone Schmidl of the victims of backpacker killer Ivan Milat.

Simone Schmidl of the victims of backpacker killer Ivan Milat.

Two of Milat's victims in the 1990s were Anja Habschied (left), 20 and Simone Schmidl (right)

Milat was admitted to hospital in May and again earlier this month for stomach and throat cancer before being returned to the hospital wing of the prison on Tuesday.

His death was slow and painful as the cancer spread to his liver, lungs, bones, and lymph nodes, and he developed fluid in his heart.

The body of Milat will be handed over to the coroner of New South Wales, who will decide, after consultation with his family, how it will be removed.

There will be an investigation into his death, as is the case with all dead in custody.

Mr. Small also said that there are at least three unsolved murders with good reasons to suspect Milat.

& # 39; We have literally looked at hundreds of other unsolved murders and disappearances … There were three other murders that were unsolved, which I think you can point at Ivan with a finger.

Former detective Clive Small, who led Milat's investigation in the mid-1990s, explained why he never believed the man would confess (photo: Milat smiles after attending the court)

Former detective Clive Small, who led Milat's investigation in the mid-1990s, explained why he never believed the man would confess (photo: Milat smiles after attending the court)

Former detective Clive Small, who led Milat's investigation in the mid-1990s, explained why he never believed the man would confess (photo: Milat smiles after attending the court)

Depicted is a room in the hospital part of the Long Bay prison where Milat died on Sunday

Depicted is a room in the hospital part of the Long Bay prison where Milat died on Sunday

Depicted is a room in the hospital part of the Long Bay prison where Milat died on Sunday

& # 39; In one case I have no doubt about it because the firearm used to kill the backpackers was also used in this specific murder that was unsolved. & # 39;

Milat was arrested in May 1994 after two months of surveillance.

The police were helped by an identification of Milat by the British man Paul Onions, who accepted a lift from him while hitchhiking from Sydney in 1990 and managed to escape the car, running onto the road while Milat shot at him.

His victims were English backpackers Caroline Clarke, 21, and Joanne Walters 22; Melbourne pair James Gibson and Deborah Everist, both 19; and German backpackers Simone Schmidl, 20, Gabor Neugebauer, 21 and Anja Habschied, 20.

He stung the most, decapitated someone whose head was never found and shot 10 more times.

Many were sharpened so fiercely that their bones were broken, some were pinched or tied, and some were suspected of being sexually abused.

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) news