Deadly blow to Instagram influencers: government watchdog & # 39; looks at adopting a strict new rule & # 39;

A great blow to Instagram influencers: the government watchdog & # 39; looks at adopting a strict new rule & # 39; who could DESTROY their business after app likes are banned

  • Watchdog examines the practice of influencers who promote events and products
  • The UK has said that everyone with more than 30,000 followers is a celebrity
  • It means that influencers must adhere to certain rules that limit their function
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& # 39; Influencers & # 39; on Instagram could soon get a devastating blow, just a week after the app has banned likes.

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) president, Rod Sims, is currently publishing a report on Instagram stars, the Daily telegram reported.

The report is likely to focus on whether their sponsored content violates laws.

It comes after UK authorities have ruled that anyone with more than 30,000 followers on social media have a & # 39; celebrity & # 39; and subject to advertising laws.

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The British Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has named the magic number after a mummy blogger who promoted a freely available sleeping pill.

Although she stated that the content was sponsored, the ASA ruled that her number of followers made her a celebrity and was therefore prohibited from using drugs.

If a similar position is taken in Australia, Instagram stars may be prohibited from posting or advertising certain photos.

Rod Sims, president of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC), is currently publishing a report on Instagram stars following the controversial ban on & # 39; likes & # 39; (photo Married At First Star Elizabeth Sobinoff who lost followers)

Rod Sims, president of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC), is currently publishing a report on Instagram stars following the controversial ban on & # 39; likes & # 39; (photo Married At First Star Elizabeth Sobinoff who lost followers)

The report is likely to focus on whether their sponsored content violates laws (pictured Instagram influencer Keira Macguire)

The report is likely to focus on whether their sponsored content violates laws (pictured Instagram influencer Keira Macguire)

The report is likely to focus on whether their sponsored content violates laws (pictured Instagram influencer Keira Macguire)

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It would again be a nail in the coffin for Australian Instagrammers who have complained about the ban on & # 39; likes & # 39; and say it will kill their company.

& # 39; Influencers & # 39; earn money by posting sponsored content.

But fickle audiences are daunting stars at an alarming rate, making it more likely that major brands will leave them.

According to the analysis site Social Blade, the page of Married At First Sight seems to suffer the star of Elizabeth Sobinoff from most people who have lost more than 1000 followers since the ban was introduced.

Mikaela Testa from Melbourne, who has less than 50,000 likes, sobbed about the changes in a video on Facebook.

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& # 39; If you think this is OK, you can get rid of it, it's actually a sad day for those who have Instagram as a job, & # 39; said Mrs. Testa.

Instagram has introduced the ban to protect the mental health of users.

It was revealed in April that the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission worked with international authorities to look at dodgy practices used by influencers.

The findings of the report are expected to be released within a few months.

The investigation was started after the number of posts by & # 39; influencers & # 39; had grown by 40 percent last year.

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Influencer management platform Traackr discovered that 72 percent of major brands said they use a large part of their marketing budgets to get popular people to advertise their products on social media.

They can charge anything from a few hundred dollars to a maximum of $ 250,000 for each item they create for a product or event.

The new British rules that Australia is currently looking for require that influencers announce whether they are being paid by a company to promote a product or event because it is classified as an advertisement.

If an influencer is caught paying for a product and he does not state this clearly, he is forced to remove the item and both parties must indicate the next time that it concerns a paid promotion.

This final blow to Australian influencers comes after the popular social media platform has removed such a count from messages to prevent the platform from affecting people's mental health (photo Love Brigitte, Australia, star Teddy Briggs)

This final blow to Australian influencers comes after the popular social media platform has removed such a count from messages to prevent the platform from affecting people's mental health (photo Love Brigitte, Australia, star Teddy Briggs)

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This final blow to Australian influencers comes after the popular social media platform has removed such a count from messages to prevent the platform from affecting people's mental health (photo Love Brigitte, Australia, star Teddy Briggs)

Mikaela Testa from Melbourne, who has less than 50,000 likes, sobbed about the changes in a video on Facebook

Mikaela Testa from Melbourne, who has less than 50,000 likes, sobbed about the changes in a video on Facebook

Mikaela Testa from Melbourne, who has less than 50,000 likes, sobbed about the changes in a video on Facebook

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