What looks like a mass of yellow confetti falling from the heavens is actually a huge swarm of bees. They look like little yellow dots in front of the brown building.

Deadly animals invade Sydney's busy central business district, can you see them?

  • An influx of life-threatening insects has been photographed invading the busy streets of the city between the skies.
  • At first there seems to be a mass of yellow confetti falling from the skies between the imposing buildings.
  • The outbreak of swarms occurs after long periods of rain and wet spring as they find a new home.

Paula Ahillon For Daily Mail Australia

An influx of life-threatening insects has been photographed invading the busy streets of the city.

At first glance, there seems to be a mass of yellow confetti falling from the skies between the towering buildings of Sydney's central business district.

But strange places are actually a sudden swarm of bees buzzing around streets and buildings.

What looks like a mass of yellow confetti falling from the heavens is actually a huge swarm of bees. They look like little yellow dots in front of the brown building.

What looks like a mass of yellow confetti falling from the heavens is actually a huge swarm of bees. They look like little yellow dots in front of the brown building.

The outbreak of bees occurs after long periods of rain and wet spring weather.

Swarms of bees instinctively follow the queen bee that is displaced from the hive after the birth of a younger queen.

The swarms have been wreaking havoc throughout Sydney and have been seen in elementary schools, shopping centers and outside the ABC headquarters in Ultimo.

A large swarm was seen near a pedestrian crossing near a shopping center in Earlwood, southwest of Sydney.

Seven-year-old Zoe Feder, of Five Dock, said she saw a large nest of bees inside her mailbox, with another at her elementary school across the street.

In the spring of last year, witnesses were surprised to see that a swarm of bees had been placed on the handle of a motorcycle parked on Castlereagh Street in the financial district of Sydney.

Spectators in the city were surprised to see a swarm of bees finding their home on a motorcycle

Spectators in the city were surprised to see a swarm of bees finding their home on a motorcycle

Spectators in the city were surprised to see a swarm of bees finding their home on a motorcycle

Bee experts have said that insects are not harmful to people as long as they are left alone.

Experts have said they are not alarmed by the swarm of swarms as insects are often frightened and homeless until their queen has established a new home.

Beekeepers are recommended to be called when a swarm is detected.

Beekeepers come to the rescue with the box, where the queen bee will be caged.

Naturally, the rest of the colony will follow the queen and fly to the box and it is a process that can take up to an hour.

The swarms are harmless and are generally scared and homeless as they wait for their queen to find a new home.

The swarms are harmless and are generally scared and homeless as they wait for their queen to find a new home.

The swarms are harmless and are generally scared and homeless as they wait for their queen to find a new home.

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