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Daughter wants to know what happened to her mother in the funeral home where bodies were found in trucks

Mourning relatives arrived at a funeral home in Brooklyn on Thursday in search of answers, a day after police found up to 100 decomposing bodies outside in unrefrigerated trucks.

Tamisha Covington said she was charged $ 15,000 for her mother’s body to ‘stay in a U-Haul truck for so long’ after her death from a heart attack related to COVID 19, aged 60, on April 9 .

She burst into tears, saying she received “no comments, no answers” from Andrew T. Cleckley Funeral Home in Flatlands after the grim discovery by officers on Wednesday. She said The New York Post: “This is too much for humanity. I’m really hurt. I don’t even know what I’m looking for except for the fact that I expect to put my mom down properly with respect and in a reasonable amount of time. ‘

Authorities discovered that two uncooled U-Haul trucks were used to store the bodies after police responded to 911 complaints from neighbors who filmed dragging body bags into the trucks.

The police found the bodies at various stages of decomposition; the locals said “you could smell death”.

The bosses of U-Haul labeled the use of their trucks on Thursday as “wrongful, blatant and inhumane”. They said TMZ: ‘Our trucks are designed for household trips. Proper care of the remains of people’s loved ones requires vehicles that are specially designed for that purpose. That is why our trucks can absolutely not be rented. ‘

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A chest is brought to a hearse from the Andrew Cleckley Funeral Home in Brooklyn, New York City on Thursday

A chest is brought to a hearse from the Andrew Cleckley Funeral Home in Brooklyn, New York City on Thursday

Dozens of bodies have been discovered in uncooled overflow trucks outside the company after a complaint about a foul odor. The Environmental Protection Department has summoned the owner of the funeral service twice

Dozens of bodies have been discovered in uncooled overflow trucks outside the company after a complaint about a foul odor. The Environmental Protection Department has summoned the owner of the funeral service twice

Dozens of bodies have been discovered in uncooled overflow trucks outside the company after a complaint about a foul odor. The Environmental Protection Department has summoned the owner of the funeral service twice

Authorities discovered that two uncooled U-Haul trucks were used to store the bodies after police responded to 911 complaints from neighbors who filmed dragging body bags into the trucks

Authorities discovered that two uncooled U-Haul trucks were used to store the bodies after police responded to 911 complaints from neighbors who filmed dragging body bags into the trucks

Authorities discovered that two uncooled U-Haul trucks were used to store the bodies after police responded to 911 complaints from neighbors who filmed dragging body bags into the trucks

Tamisha Covington, in the photo, said she was charged $ 15,000 for her mother's body to be 'kept in a U-Haul truck for so long' after her death from a heart attack related to COVID 19.60 years old, on April 9

Tamisha Covington, in the photo, said she was charged $ 15,000 for her mother's body to 'be kept in a U-Haul truck for so long' after her death from a heart attack related to COVID 19.60 years old, on April 9

Tamisha Covington, in the photo, said she was charged $ 15,000 for her mother’s body to ‘be kept in a U-Haul truck for so long’ after her death from a heart attack related to COVID 19.60 years old, on April 9

Workers move bodies to refrigerated van at Andrew T. Cleckley Funeral Home in Brooklyn Wednesday after authorities determined the facility stored up to 100 bodies in two uncooled U-Haul storage trolleys

Workers move bodies to refrigerated van at Andrew T. Cleckley Funeral Home in Brooklyn Wednesday after authorities determined the facility stored up to 100 bodies in two uncooled U-Haul storage trolleys

Workers move bodies to refrigerated van at Andrew T. Cleckley Funeral Home in Brooklyn Wednesday after authorities determined the facility stored up to 100 bodies in two uncooled U-Haul storage trolleys

Shown here, workers secure a van full of dead people's bodies during coronavirus disease outbreaks at the Andrew Cleckley Funeral Home in Brooklyn on Wednesday. The owner of the house said the freezer was broken and overwhelmed by the wave of bodies caused by the coronavirus outbreak, they used these vans as storage for weeks

Shown here, workers secure a van full of dead people's bodies during coronavirus disease outbreaks at the Andrew Cleckley Funeral Home in Brooklyn on Wednesday. The owner of the house said the freezer was broken and overwhelmed by the wave of bodies caused by the coronavirus outbreak, they used these vans as storage for weeks

Shown here, workers secure a van full of dead people’s bodies during coronavirus disease outbreaks at the Andrew Cleckley Funeral Home in Brooklyn on Wednesday. The owner of the house said the freezer was broken and overwhelmed by the wave of bodies caused by the coronavirus outbreak, they used these vans as storage for weeks

As many as 50 corpses were stored in each truck, according to ABC newsbecause the facility struggled to keep up with the overwhelming wave of bodies resulting from the coronavirus outbreak.

The owner told city officials that the freezer had stopped working and that they had to use the trucks as storage space while bodies were waiting for burial or cremation.

A grieving family member said he had been told “the refrigerators were filled and they were going to embalm,” his late ex-wife.

The man, known only as Paul, said his deceased relative came to the funeral store on Friday. He added, “And now they say she was in the fridge as soon as they brought her here on Friday, so I don’t know.

‘I’m frustrated. This is ridiculous.’

After neighbors complained for weeks about the smell of U-Haul vans used to store bodies at the funeral home, the NYPD examined Wednesday and discovered 100 bodies at various stages of decomposition

After neighbors complained for weeks about the smell of U-Haul vans used to store bodies at the funeral home, the NYPD examined Wednesday and discovered 100 bodies at various stages of decomposition

After neighbors complained for weeks about the smell of U-Haul vans used to store bodies at the funeral home, the NYPD examined Wednesday and discovered 100 bodies at various stages of decomposition

Police responded to a report of human bodies in Brooklyn vehicles on Wednesday found to be connected to the nearby funeral home. They discovered 100 decomposing bodies in two U-Haul trucks. A freezer was brought in by officials helping the workers transfer the corpses wrapped in body bags

Police responded to a report of human bodies in Brooklyn vehicles on Wednesday found to be connected to the nearby funeral home. They discovered 100 decomposing bodies in two U-Haul trucks. A freezer was brought in by officials helping the workers transfer the corpses wrapped in body bags

Police responded to a report of human bodies in Brooklyn vehicles on Wednesday found to be connected to the nearby funeral home. They discovered 100 decomposing bodies in two U-Haul trucks. A freezer was brought in by officials helping the workers transfer the corpses wrapped in body bags

‘For weeks, trucks have been constantly outside the unloading companies. You could smell death, “Jay Fredo told New York Daily News. “Some of them have fallen. I know it’s a pandemic, but this is crazy. It is sick. “

No charges were brought, but the house was cited for not controlling the odors.

The facility was able to get hold of a larger, refrigerated truck later in the day, the official said, and workers dressed in protective equipment could be seen carrying bodies in the afternoon.

“I saw 15 bodies stacked in the U-Haul box truck, and more in the others,” an agent told the New York Daily News. “They stored them on the street.”

An employee told ABC that there were 30 to 40 bodies left and some were kept on the ground.

“This funeral home is filled with human remains and that is true,” says Dr. David Penepent, an undertaker who teaches in SUNY Canton and has been brought in by the state to help.

“He was overwhelmed with the number of remains he had and he didn’t know what to do and I’m here to help him with this operation.”

Neighbors made these videos of the bodies stacked in the back of the trucks in recent days

Neighbors made these videos of the bodies stacked in the back of the trucks in recent days

Videos made by the locals of the bodies stored on the trucks

Videos made by the locals of the bodies stored on the trucks

Neighbors made these videos of the bodies that had been mercilessly stacked in the back of the trucks in recent days. They had been complaining for weeks about the smell coming from the trucks

The bodies were packed in body bags in the U-Haul trucks for weeks awaiting cremation or burial. Neighbors filed complaints with the authorities after filming the decomposing corpses stacked in the trucks

The bodies were packed in body bags in the U-Haul trucks for weeks awaiting cremation or burial. Neighbors filed complaints with the authorities after filming the decomposing corpses stacked in the trucks

The bodies were packed in body bags in the U-Haul trucks for weeks awaiting cremation or burial. Neighbors filed complaints with the authorities after filming the decomposing corpses stacked in the trucks

NYPD officers secure trucks full of bodies in Brooklyn on Wednesday. Officers made the horrifying discovery of as many as 100 bodies stored in two U-Haul vans outside the Andrew Cleckley Funeral Home

NYPD officers secure trucks full of bodies in Brooklyn on Wednesday. Officers made the horrifying discovery of as many as 100 bodies stored in two U-Haul vans outside the Andrew Cleckley Funeral Home

NYPD officers secure trucks full of bodies in Brooklyn on Wednesday. Officers made the horrifying discovery of as many as 100 bodies stored in two U-Haul vans outside the Andrew Cleckley Funeral Home

As many as 100 bodies were reportedly kept in uncooled storage trucks outside the funeral home

As many as 100 bodies were reportedly kept in uncooled storage trucks outside the funeral home

As many as 100 bodies were reportedly kept in uncooled storage trucks outside the funeral home

John DiPietro, owner of the neighboring property, told it New York Post that cadavers had been at the funeral for weeks.

“You don’t respect the dead like that. That could have been my father, my brother, ”said DiPietro.

According to the Post, the funeral home told the police that the bodies would go to the crematorium, but no one had come to pick them up.

In contrast to, ABC news reports that the undertaker had told the municipality that their freezer was broken.

Funeral homes in New York City have been overwhelmed during the coronavirus pandemic in recent weeks.

Aerial photographs showed that the bodies were taken from the U-Haul vehicles and transferred to a refrigerated truck

Aerial photographs showed that the bodies were taken from the U-Haul vehicles and transferred to a refrigerated truck

Aerial photographs showed that the bodies were taken from the U-Haul vehicles and transferred to a refrigerated truck

The police closed the area around the funeral center and the trucks on Wednesday evening when complaints about piles of bodies were investigated

The police closed the area around the funeral center and the trucks on Wednesday evening when complaints about piles of bodies were investigated

The police closed the area around the funeral center and the trucks on Wednesday evening when complaints about piles of bodies were investigated

The undertakers were depicted entering and exiting the building on Wednesday wearing protective clothing

The undertakers were depicted entering and exiting the building on Wednesday wearing protective clothing

The undertakers were depicted entering and exiting the building on Wednesday wearing protective clothing

The smell of the bodies stored in the trucks reached the surrounding buildings depicted here. The owner told officials that the freezer in the house was broken. The city brought a freezer truck on Wednesday to store the corpses

The smell of the bodies stored in the trucks reached the surrounding buildings depicted here. The owner told officials that the freezer in the house was broken. The city brought a freezer truck on Wednesday to store the corpses

The smell of the bodies stored in the trucks reached the surrounding buildings depicted here. The owner told officials that the freezer in the house was broken. The city brought a freezer truck on Wednesday to store the corpses

The houses should store bodies awaiting burial or cremation in appropriate conditions that prevent infection.

The city was forced to purchase freezer trucks this month to temporarily hold the corpses because the burials reached their capacity and there was no more room to store the corpses.

Brooklyn Borough president Eric Adams said on Wednesday evening that he went to Flatlands to investigate the complaint, calling for an urgent reform of the city’s burial process.

“This is exactly what I spoke about last weekend regarding the urgent need for reform in the treatment of bodies and funeral processes,” Adams tweeted.

“We demand proper treatment from our deceased.

“While this situation is under investigation, we shouldn’t have what we have now, with trucks lined the streets full of bodies.

“It was people walking by who saw some punctures and discovered a truck smell.”

Police wore face masks while they guarded the sickly scene. Officers are said to have found up to 100 bodies in the trucks

Police wore face masks while they guarded the sickly scene. Officers are said to have found up to 100 bodies in the trucks

Police wore face masks while they guarded the sickly scene. Officers are said to have found up to 100 bodies in the trucks

Funeral homes in New York City have been overwhelmed in recent weeks. The magnitude of the tension was revealed on Wednesday when the police officers depicted here were called to a funeral home in Brooklyn over complaints of bodies being stored in uncooled trucks

Funeral homes in New York City have been overwhelmed in recent weeks. The magnitude of the tension was revealed on Wednesday when the police officers depicted here were called to a funeral home in Brooklyn over complaints of bodies being stored in uncooled trucks

Funeral homes in New York City have been overwhelmed in recent weeks. The magnitude of the tension was revealed on Wednesday when the police officers depicted here were called to a funeral home in Brooklyn over complaints of bodies being stored in uncooled trucks

President Eric Adams in Brooklyn Borough traveled to the scene calling for a reform of the city's burial process

President Eric Adams in Brooklyn Borough traveled to the scene calling for a reform of the city's burial process

President Eric Adams in Brooklyn Borough traveled to the scene calling for a reform of the city’s burial process

Neighbors told New York Daily News of the increasingly foul odor emanating from the funeral home, and trucks being unloaded constantly for weeks.

“I’ve seen bodies stacked on top of each other in the trucks with both doors open,” said Abdul Kamara, 40.

“They’ve stored bodies in the trucks. It has been happening since the beginning of COVID. These people have succeeded. This is not the way they should be treated on the way out. ‘

The Andrew T. Cleckley Funeral Home on Utica Ave. and Ave. M in the Flatlands has been cited for not controlling dead body odor after using uncooled rental U-Haul trucks as storage for weeks after their freezer broke

The Andrew T. Cleckley Funeral Home on Utica Ave. and Ave. M in the Flatlands has been cited for not controlling dead body odor after using uncooled rental U-Haul trucks as storage for weeks after their freezer broke

The Andrew T. Cleckley Funeral Home on Utica Ave. and Ave. M in the Flatlands has been cited for not controlling dead body odor after using uncooled rental U-Haul trucks as storage for weeks after their freezer broke

The NYPD and several state and city agencies, including the Department of Health, visited the Andrew T. Cleckley Funeral Home in Brooklyn on Wednesday evening after complaints were made that the facility was using rented trucks to store bodies

The NYPD and several state and city agencies, including the Department of Health, visited the Andrew T. Cleckley Funeral Home in Brooklyn on Wednesday evening after complaints were made that the facility was using rented trucks to store bodies

The NYPD and several state and city agencies, including the Department of Health, visited the Andrew T. Cleckley Funeral Home in Brooklyn on Wednesday evening after complaints were made that the facility was using rented trucks to store bodies

Andrew T. Cleckley Funeral Home employees on Utica Ave. and Ave. M in Flatlands, Brooklyn, are shown here in protective gear after the NYPD visited in connection with complaints about the way they stored bodies

Andrew T. Cleckley Funeral Home employees on Utica Ave. and Ave. M in Flatlands, Brooklyn, are shown here in protective gear after the NYPD visited in connection with complaints about the way they stored bodies

Andrew T. Cleckley Funeral Home employees on Utica Ave. and Ave. M in Flatlands, Brooklyn, are shown here in protective gear after the NYPD visited in connection with complaints about the way they stored bodies

The New York Times reports that the Department of Health, which regulates the funeral homes, was called on site to determine whether the home handled human remains properly.

Cleckley is not a member of the New York Funeral Directors Association, the organization said.

Wednesday’s terrible discovery came after city officials declared last week that they would temporarily freeze bodies instead of burying them on Hart Island.

The city says freezer trucks are used that can keep human remains for up to a year.

Adams has said that he wants to form a funeral committee from Monday to help the city deal with the consequences of the coronavirus outbreak and the high death toll in recent weeks.

“This community will be traumatized so long after COVID-19,” said the branch president.

“Coordination between funeral directors, cemeteries and the city is needed to address this situation.”

Nearly half of all New York City residents say they know someone who has died from the coronavirus, a new poll shows, which sheds a stunning light on how deeply the pandemic has hit the Big Apple.

The state-wide survey, conducted by Siena College and released this week, found that 46 percent of New York City residents personally knew someone killed by COVID-19, as well as 36 percent of respondents in the suburbs, and 13 percent of those in live in the state.

The deadly virus has had a particularly big impact on New York’s minority communities: 52 percent of Latino voters and 48 percent of black voters confirmed they know someone who has died, compared to just 25 percent of white respondents.

In total, about one in three people in New York State has a fatal outcome from the outbreak.

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