Home US Data reveals America’s top 10 feel-good songs based on Spotify playlist data… did YOUR favorite make the list?

Data reveals America’s top 10 feel-good songs based on Spotify playlist data… did YOUR favorite make the list?

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A new survey of 993 playlists for

The right song can be a natural mood booster and a shot of adrenaline when you need to energize yourself, and a new study reveals the best songs for just that.

An analysis of nearly 1,000 “feel good” playlists by Spotify users has identified the 10 most universal mood-lifting songs: Australian frontman Vance Joy’s 2013 hit “Riptide” came in at number one .

The song, which helped Joy surpass Lady Gaga’s ‘Poker Face’ on the Australian Top 100 singles chart, appeared on 12.3 per cent of ‘feel good’ playlists (122 out of 993). studied.

Basic element of millennial karaoke ‘Mr. The Killers’ Brightside tied for second place (11.7 percent), appearing on 116 of the ‘feel good’ playlists examined through Spotify’s Playlist Miner tool, as did ‘As It Was’ by Harry Styles and ‘Heat Waves’ by Glass Animals.

Data reveals Americas top 10 feel good songs based on Spotify

A new survey of 993 “feel good” playlists on Spotify has identified the 10 most universal mood-lifting songs, and Australian frontman Vance Joy’s (pictured above) 2013 hit, “Riptide,” made it in to number one.

America’s Top 10 Feel-Good Songs (Based on Spotify Playlist Appearances)
Artist Song Number of appearances in playlists Share of Playlist Appearances
happiness Turby waters 122 12.30%
The murderers Mr. Brightside 116 11.70%
Harry styles How was it 116 11.70%
glass animals Heat waves 116 11.70%
Outkast Hi Yes! 106 10.70%
neon trees everyone talks 105 10.60%
walk the moon Shut up and dance 104 10.50%
MKTO Classic 103 10.40%
Coldplay live life 103 10.40%
Earth Wind and Fire September 101 10.20%

“When you can’t find the perfect playlist,” the researchers noted, “you’re constantly switching from one to another.”

“These findings eliminate this problem by providing a list of Americans’ favorite songs that are sure to change their day.”

The presence of so many contemporary and recent hits surprised those who conducted the survey, who noted that Miley Cyrus’ ‘Flowers’ ranked in the top 20 ‘despite having been released only in the last year.’

Cyrus’s biting ode to self-care appeared on 95 playlists, meaning nearly one in 10 of Spotify users surveyed turned to it when they needed a pick-me-up.

The oldest song to reach the top 10 was Earth, Wind & Fire’s beloved soft disco classic ‘September,’ proving its value as a wedding reception track with appearances on 10.2 percent of these ‘feel’ lists. good’ (101 of 993). .

Previous academic research conducted by music psychologist. Dr. Michael Bonshor from the University of Sheffield last year also highlighted the staying power of Earth, Wind & Fire’s “feel-good” success.

Basic element of millennial karaoke 'Mr. The Killers' Brightside (above) tied for second place (11.7 percent), appearing on 116 of the 'feel good' playlists examined through Spotify's Playlist Miner tool, as did 'As It Was' and 'Heat Waves' by Harry Styles from Crystal Animals

Basic element of millennial karaoke 'Mr. The Killers' 'Brightside' (above) tied for second place (11.7 percent), appearing on 116 of the 'feel good' playlists examined through Spotify's Playlist Miner tool, as did 'As It Was' and 'Heat Waves' by Harry Styles from Crystal Animals

Basic element of millennial karaoke ‘Mr. The Killers’ Brightside (above) tied for second place (11.7 percent), appearing on 116 of the ‘feel good’ playlists examined through Spotify’s Playlist Miner tool, as did ‘As It Was’ and ‘Heat Waves’ by Harry Styles from Crystal Animals

Holding firm amidst this 'feel good' top ten, hip hop duo Outkast's once-ubiquitous early 2000s hit 'Hey Ya' claimed fifth place, featuring rappers Big Boi's tune and André 3000 (pictured above) landing at 106 out of 993 playlists (10.7 percent)

Holding firm amidst this 'feel good' top ten, hip hop duo Outkast's once-ubiquitous early 2000s hit 'Hey Ya' claimed fifth place, featuring rappers Big Boi's tune and André 3000 (pictured above) landing at 106 out of 993 playlists (10.7 percent)

Holding firm amidst this ‘feel good’ top ten, hip hop duo Outkast’s once-ubiquitous early 2000s hit ‘Hey Ya’ claimed fifth place, featuring rappers Big Boi’s tune and André 3000 (pictured above) landing at 106 out of 993 playlists (10.7 percent)

Also there, ‘September’ ranked No. 10 on a list of much older mid-century radio classics, including The Beach Boys’ ‘Good Vibrations’ and ‘I Got You (I Feel Good)’ by himself. Godfather of Soul’. , James Brown.

“We like it loud when it comes to how our happy songs are composed,” Dr. Bonshor said, “with notes played brightly and lively by instruments like trumpets or electric guitars rather than softer instruments.”

“Also, happy songs usually have a strong 1-2-1-2 rhythm,” the psychologist added, “so you can dance.”

Dr. Bonshor’s research was commissioned by yogurt brand Müllerlight, and this new survey of Spotify “feel good” playlists had its own unexpected sponsor.

The survey was carried out by Bonus Ninja, a site that says it helps compare and review online casino services for audiences in Ontario, Canada. The site’s staff, according to its parent company’s LinkedIn page. Media investmentis based primarily in the Eastern European nation of Estonia.

“More than 10 years after its release, Australian singer-songwriter Vance Joy’s “Riptide” continues to make fans smile,” said a Bonus Ninja spokesperson.

Holding firm amidst this ‘feel good’ top ten, hip hop duo Outkast’s once ubiquitous early 2000s hit ‘Hey Ya’ claimed fifth place, featuring the tune of rappers Big Boi and André 3000 landing on 106 playlists (10.7 percent).

Just below them was a band that became famous by opening several of The Killers’ shows on a 2008 tour: Neon Trees, whose song Everybody Talks appeared on 105 Spotify playlists labeled “feel good” (10, 6 percent).

What the lyrics of your favorite songs say about your romantic attachment style

Researchers at the University of Toronto say the lyrics of our most beloved songs reveal our attachment style.

People with a “secure” attachment style are comfortable with closeness, while “avoidant” people may withdraw when their partner gets too close.

An “anxious” attachment style indicates that the person tends to be overly attentive to their partner and constantly seeks reassurance in their bond.

Lyrics such as ‘I guess she gave you things I didn’t give you’ from Adele’s ‘Someone Like You’ reflect an anxious attachment style, according to the study.

People with an avoidant attachment style may gravitate toward “What does love have to do with it?” by Tina Turner, which includes the words “who needs a heart when a heart can break?”

However, those with a secure attachment style may like “there’s no hill or mountain we can’t climb” from Sonny & Cher’s “I Got You Babe.”

Read more here

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