Dark feathers make birds MORE aerodynamic

Scientists believe that the core of the earth is responsible for creating its magnetic field, a force created by moving electrical charges.

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While molten iron escapes into the outer core of the earth, it creates convection currents. These currents generate electrical currents that create the magnetic field.

This is a natural process known as a geodynamo.

This creates a geomagnetic field that extends from the inside of the earth to where it meets the solar wind, which are charged particles coming from the sun.

Birds use this magnetic field to map their migration routes. This is often their & # 39; sixth sense & # 39; called.

To let a bird know roughly where he is in the world – and to correct himself if he gets off course – he needs a so-called "real navigation".

This means that it can determine its latitude and longitude in one way or another.

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For humans, the longitude problem – the coordinate indicating an east-west axis position on the Earth's surface – proved insoluble until the invention of accurate clocks.

To let a bird know about where it is in the world and to correct itself when it gets off course, it has a so-called & # 39; real navigation & # 39; required. The earth's magnetic field (stock image) is displayed

To let a bird know roughly where he is in the world – and to correct himself if he gets off course – he has a so-called & # 39; real navigation & # 39; required. The earth's magnetic field (stock image) is displayed

The magnetic north and south poles are usually located near the geographic poles. However, they vary over geological time and they turn once every hundreds of thousands of years.

While a compass needle points to magnetic north, this is not the real north – the North Pole.

Depending on where you are, the magnetic north is one or more degrees further east or west of the north pole.

New research suggests that birds rely on a protein in their eyes, meaning that they can & # 39; see & # 39;

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Scientists from Lund University in Sweden looked at zebra finches, while researchers from Carl von Ossietzky University Oldenburg in Germany studied European robins.

According to researchers, a protein called Cry4, which is present 24 hours a day and means that birds can still navigate & night, is responsible for this.

This means that they can & # 39; see & # 39; these magnetic fields over their normal eyesight.

Researchers also discovered that European robins had increased Cry4 expression during the migration season.

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) sciencetech

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