Dame Judi Dench takes three orangutans after he has gone to the depths of the Borneo

Dame Judi Dench has adopted three orangutans after the start of a crusade to save the rainforests of Borneo and the endangered species.

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The 84-year-old actress made the revelation after her appearance in the new ITV documentary series Wild Borneo Adventure by Judi Dench.

In the show, first aired on July 2, she explores one of the few pristine rainforests that are still in Southeast Asia, in Malaysia, Borneo, which has some of the most diverse wildlife on the planet.

During her visit she works with orangutans, but also with bears from the sun, elephants, crocodiles and hornbills.

Dame Judi Dench has adopted three orangutans after the start of a crusade to save the rainforests of Borneo and the endangered species. (She is depicted with a monkey in the Sepilok Rehabilitation Center on the island)

Dame Judi Dench has adopted three orangutans after the start of a crusade to save the rainforests of Borneo and the endangered species. (She is depicted with a monkey in the Sepilok Rehabilitation Center on the island)

The 84-year-old actress revealed that she had adopted the monkeys after her appearance in Judi Dench's new ITV documentary series Wild Borneo Adventure. Orangutans are slowly disappearing from rainforests and approaching extinction. The great apes are currently only found on Borneo and Sumatra and are classified as & # 39; seriously endangered & # 39;

The 84-year-old actress revealed that she had adopted the monkeys after her appearance in Judi Dench's new ITV documentary series Wild Borneo Adventure. Orangutans are slowly disappearing from rainforests and approaching extinction. The great apes are currently only found on Borneo and Sumatra and are classified as & # 39; seriously endangered & # 39;

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The 84-year-old actress revealed that she had adopted the monkeys after her appearance in Judi Dench's new ITV documentary series Wild Borneo Adventure. Orangutans are slowly disappearing from rainforests and approaching extinction. The great apes are currently only found on Borneo and Sumatra and are classified as & # 39; seriously endangered & # 39;

In the show, first aired on July 2, Dame Judi investigates one of the few pristine rainforests that are still in Southeast Asia, in Malaysia, Borneo, which has some of the most diverse wildlife on the planet . (Pictured, a wild orangutan high in the foliage of the forest)

In the show, first aired on July 2, Dame Judi investigates one of the few pristine rainforests that are still in Southeast Asia, in Malaysia, Borneo, which has some of the most diverse wildlife on the planet . (Pictured, a wild orangutan high in the foliage of the forest)

In the show, first aired on July 2, Dame Judi investigates one of the few pristine rainforests that are still in Southeast Asia, in Malaysia, Borneo, which has some of the most diverse wildlife on the planet . (Pictured, a wild orangutan high in the foliage of the forest)

Borneo, & # 39; the world's third largest island, contains incredibly tall tropical trees, as high as 300ft - and the series sees Dame Judi climb one of them. Orangutans spend most of their lives in the trees

Borneo, & # 39; the world's third largest island, contains incredibly tall tropical trees, as high as 300ft - and the series sees Dame Judi climb one of them. Orangutans spend most of their lives in the trees

Borneo, & # 39; the world's third largest island, contains incredibly tall tropical trees, as high as 300ft – and the series sees Dame Judi climb one of them. Orangutans spend most of their lives in the trees

She announced the Monkey adoption while performing a Q&A after a premiere of the documentary on Thursday

Dame Judi discussed a meeting with one of them in an orphanage – describing how the & # 39; small little orangutan & # 39; in a playful way & # 39; like a child & # 39; traded the Sunday Telegraaf reported.

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On her journey in the two-part series – in which she was accompanied by the man she likes to refer to as her & # 39; gap & # 39 ;, conservationist David Mills – she meets wild and orphaned orangutans, who share 97 percent of their DNA with people .

She also gets to see a Kubong – a gliding mammal that can fly over 100 meters – along with more than a million bats, a dung beetle named Bob and a snake she calls James Bond – no doubt a reference to her turn as M in different 007 films, including Skyfall.

At one point she says: & Here we are on this incredible river on a Wednesday morning. We just found a crocodile. No Wednesday will ever be the same.

& # 39; It doesn't happen often that this happens, that you walk down a corridor and follow a small, three-year-old orangutan around you. What a great view, & # 39; bustle.com reported.

During her visit, Dame Judi also works with sun bears (above, one sleeping in heaven), elephants, crocodiles and hornbills

During her visit, Dame Judi also works with sun bears (above, one sleeping in heaven), elephants, crocodiles and hornbills

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During her visit, Dame Judi also works with sun bears (above, one sleeping in heaven), elephants, crocodiles and hornbills

Above, Dame Judi sees her first wild orangutan. Most scientific evidence suggests that the survival of orangutan species is still seriously threatened by deforestation and murder. Borneo lost more than 100,000 orangutans between 1999 and 2015, according to a Current Biology study in 2018

Above, Dame Judi sees her first wild orangutan. Most scientific evidence suggests that the survival of orangutan species is still seriously threatened by deforestation and murder. Borneo lost more than 100,000 orangutans between 1999 and 2015, according to a Current Biology study in 2018

Above, Dame Judi sees her first wild orangutan. Most scientific evidence suggests that the survival of orangutan species is still seriously threatened by deforestation and murder. Borneo lost more than 100,000 orangutans between 1999 and 2015, according to a Current Biology study in 2018

A Harlequin tree frog in the rainforest of Borneo

A Harlequin tree frog in the rainforest of Borneo

The actress also meets a hornbill

The actress also meets a hornbill

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Among the creatures the veteran actress encounters on her journey are a Harlequin tree frog (left) and a hornbill

Borneo, & # 39; the world's third largest island, contains incredibly tall tropical trees, as high as 300 feet (90 m) – and the series sees Dame Judi climb one of them.

Orangutans are slowly disappearing from rainforests and approaching extinction.

The great apes are currently only found on Borneo and Sumatra and are classified as & # 39; seriously endangered & # 39 ;.

Most scientific evidence suggests that the survival of orangutan species is still seriously threatened by deforestation and murder.

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Borneo lost more than 100,000 orangutans between 1999 and 2015, according to a Current Biology study in 2018.

Young orangutans up to the age of seven are wanted for the illegal trade in pets.

And peat swamp forests with a high density of orangutans are often the target of palm oil plantations.

Those who adopt endangered animals & # 39; often receive a fact sheet, photos, a certificate and stuffed animal – while their financial contribution supports the vital work that is being done to conserve endangered wildlife and habitats.

Judi Dench & # 39; s Wild Borneo Adventure starts Tuesday July 2 at 9 p.m. on ITV.

Dame Judi embarked on her rain forest crusade with the man she likes to refer to as her & # 39; dude & # 39; - nature conservationist David Mills (pictured together)

Dame Judi embarked on her rain forest crusade with the man she likes to refer to as her & # 39; dude & # 39; - nature conservationist David Mills (pictured together)

Dame Judi embarked on her rainforest crusade with the man she likes to refer to as her & # 39; dude & # 39; – nature conservationist David Mills (pictured together)

Peat swamp forests with a high density of orangutans are often the target of palm oil plantations. (Above, the rainforest of Borneo)

Peat swamp forests with a high density of orangutans are often the target of palm oil plantations. (Above, the rainforest of Borneo)

Peat swamp forests with a high density of orangutans are often the target of palm oil plantations. (Above, the rainforest of Borneo)

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