Damaged French submarine cut in half so that the rescue half can be welded onto another chopped submarine

0

A French submarine has been cut in half and the rescue half is ready to be welded onto another chopped submarine.

The nuclear-powered Perle was badly damaged in a fire last year, rendering the front part of the boat unusable, according to the French Ministry of Defense.

Although the accidental fire, which broke out while the ship was docked in Toulon, southern France, raged for 14 hours, the rear half of the 241-meter submarine was undamaged.

Officials determined that another submarine awaiting decommissioning at a shipyard in Cherbourg’s northwestern harbor could be split and merged with the rear of the Perle to create a functional attack submarine.

The Perle was transported to Cherbourg in December and halved in February. A month later, the other submarine – the Saphir – was also cut in half, French shipbuilder Naval Group said. a press release

A French submarine has been cut in half and the rescue half is ready to be welded onto another chopped submarine.  The two halves of the ships were put on rollers at the beginning of this month, allowing them to be accurately aligned and welded

A French submarine has been cut in half and the rescue half is ready to be welded onto another chopped submarine. The two halves of the ships were put on rollers at the beginning of this month, allowing them to be accurately aligned and welded

The two halves of the ships were put on walkers at the beginning of this month, allowing them to be accurately aligned and welded.

Merging them is expected to begin in the coming months, the Naval Group said.

The release added that the new submarine will keep the name de Perle and will be about four and a half feet longer than each of the submarines it is made of.

This provides space for a ‘connection area’ while splicing the many cables and pipes that run through the sub.

It will also house new living quarters for the crew of 70 submariners.

The nuclear-powered Perle (pictured) was badly damaged by a fire last year, rendering the front part of the boat unusable, according to the French Ministry of Defense.

The nuclear-powered Perle (pictured) was badly damaged by a fire last year, rendering the front part of the boat unusable, according to the French Ministry of Defense.

The Naval Group will prepare for the delicate connection process by rehearsing with a digital 3D model.

The procedure involves 250,000 hours of work by 300 people, along with 100,000 hours of technical studies, the group said.

Franck Ferrer, program director for Naval Group’s Services Division, said in January that the new submarine would be returned to Toulon later this year so that more technical work and combat system upgrades can be applied before it enters the French fleet in early 2023.

“Carrying out projects like this in these conditions, that is, repair work involving joining the fore and aft sides of two sister ships, is of course a first in Naval Group’s modern history,” Ferrer said.

CNN reported that the US Navy had carried out a similar procedure on one of its damaged ships, replacing the bow of the USS San Francisco with the bow of the USS Honolulu, which was about to be retired.

The Naval Group will prepare for the delicate connection process by rehearsing with a digital 3D model.  The procedure involves 250,000 hours of work by 300 people, along with 100,000 hours of technical studies, the group said

The Naval Group will prepare for the delicate connection process by rehearsing with a digital 3D model. The procedure involves 250,000 hours of work by 300 people, along with 100,000 hours of technical studies, the group said

Commissioned in 1993, the Perle was the newest of six Rubis-class nuclear submarines in the French fleet.

The Saphir, was put into service in 1984 and has served 35 years.

The Rubis-class submarines will be replaced by Barracuda’s nuclear-powered submarines in the coming years.

The first of these, the Suffren, was delivered to the French Navy in November.

The Naval Group said the sixth Barracuda is not expected to join the fleet until 2030, so the new Perle will have to be active until then to keep the French attack submarines at the required number of six.

Merging them is expected to begin in the coming months, the Naval Group said.  The release added that the new submarine will keep the name de Perle and will be about four and a half feet longer than each of the submarines it is made of.  This provides space for a 'connection area' while splicing the many cables and pipes that run through the sub.

Merging them is expected to begin in the coming months, the Naval Group said. The release added that the new submarine will keep the name de Perle and will be about four and a half feet longer than each of the submarines it is made of. This provides space for a ‘connection area’ while splicing the many cables and pipes that run through the sub.