Dallas policeman who shot and killed his black neighbor and missed signs & # 039; showing that he parked on the wrong floor

Dallas police officer Amber Guyger was hired on Sunday, September 9, after the fatal shooting of Botham Jean in his own apartment.

The Dallas policeman who shot and killed his black neighbor above missed the signs in the parking lot of his apartment complex that had shown him he was on the wrong floor, DailyMail.com may reveal.

Amber Guyger, 30, claimed in an affidavit used as the basis for her arrest warrant that she had accidentally stationed on the fourth floor instead of the third, and therefore went to the Botham Jean apartment directly above of yours.

But the photos taken by DailyMail.com show that each space is clearly marked with the floor number, from one to five, with the bright red numbers painted on the wall at eye level.

Although access to the visitor level on the ground floor is open, those attempting to reach the residential floor must use an electronic pass.

Dallas police officer Amber Guyger was hired on Sunday, September 9, after the fatal shooting of Botham Jean in his own apartment.

Dallas police officer Amber Guyger was hired on Sunday, September 9, after the fatal shooting of Botham Jean in his own apartment.

Once inside the complex, the department signs light up clearly and are placed to the left of each door with the number at eye level.

Guyger said he had not realized he was trying to enter department 1478 instead of his own – 1378.

He also insisted that the door was ajar and was flung open when he firmly inserted his key into the lock.

Once inside, the 30-year-old policeman says he saw a "dark silhouette" that he assumed belonged to a thief and opened fire after Jean, 26, ignored his orders.

Pictures of the garage in the apartment complex where Botham Jean and Amber Guyger lived, showing a clearly marked parking space

Pictures of the garage in the apartment complex where Botham Jean and Amber Guyger lived, showing a clearly marked parking space

Pictures of the garage in the apartment complex where Botham Jean and Amber Guyger lived, showing a clearly marked parking space

But as DailyMail.com revealed earlier, its official statement contains a number of inaccuracies, including that the door might have been left ajar.

A video created with the help of a neighbor shows that heavy metal fire doors, identical to all apartments in the Southside Flats complex, close automatically when released.

Guyger, as she is hired after surrendering to the police after shooting her black neighbor

Guyger, as she is hired after surrendering to the police after shooting her black neighbor

Guyger, as she is hired after surrendering to the police after shooting her black neighbor

Botham Jean, who was shot to death by his neighbor below, Amber Guyger

Botham Jean, who was shot to death by his neighbor below, Amber Guyger

Botham Jean, who was shot to death by his neighbor below, Amber Guyger

In a second film, it is clear that the electronic key that Guyger claimed to have put in Jean's lock would not have unlocked his door and would have turned red, another indication that he was in the wrong place.

The neighbor, who lives two doors down and asked not to be identified, said: "These are 20 m fire doors. You can not really leave it open.

& # 39; The key situation too: you can not go anywhere, you can not, it's impossible. You can put it but you can not open it.

You can put it in another person's hole but you can not open anything. This key is not programmed for my door; if I put it on, nothing happens other than this red light. "

Unlike Jean, who had a bright red mat directly in front of his door, Guyger did not have a mat or any personal touch outside his own door.

Resident parking at the apartment complex in Dallas, Texas, where Botham Jean and Amber Guyger lived.

Resident parking at the apartment complex in Dallas, Texas, where Botham Jean and Amber Guyger lived.

Resident parking at the apartment complex in Dallas, Texas, where Botham Jean and Amber Guyger lived.

In an additional twist, a Dallas Police Department search warrant recently released for Jean's department seems to contradict the account of the incident included in the arrest warrant.

Police officer Angela Arredondo writes that Guyger, dressed in full uniform, had tried to enter the apartment using his keys and was "confined at the door" by Jean.

Guyger had told the Texas Rangers that he had let himself in before seeing Jean inside.

He adds: "The neighbor said he heard an exchange of words, followed immediately by at least two shots.

"The officer possibly believed that the subject was an intruder, took out his service weapon and shot the subject, hitting him in the chest.

"The subject, who is identified as Botham Shem Jean, was transported to Baylor Hospital, where he was pronounced deceased."

The account would seem to support that of the Jean family lawyer, Lee Merritt, who says he has statements from two neighbors who say they heard Guyger yell "let me in, let me in" before opening fire.

The search warrant also included a list of items recovered from Jean's apartment, including two spent cartridges and two used medical kits.

Tweet showing the scene from the outside of Botham Jean's apartment

Tweet showing the scene from the outside of Botham Jean's apartment

Tweet showing the scene from the outside of Botham Jean's apartment

Controversially, it also revealed the presence of a quantity of marijuana and a marijuana mill, whose inclusion was described as an attempt to "defame" Jean's memory by her family's lawyers during a press conference in Dallas on Friday.

Speaking at the same press conference, Jean's mother, Allison, described the content of the search warrant as "unacceptable" and added: "It's time we recognize that lives matter." My son's life matters. "

Toxicology tests were performed on the scene in Guyger, but the results have not yet been published and the tests may not have been completed.

Jean, who was a banking executive at PriceWaterhouseCoopers in Dallas, was remembered yesterday at an emotional service in Richardson, Texas.

During the service, his uncle Ignatius Jean used his praise to hit Guyger, telling the congregation that it was a tragedy for his nephew to die at the hands of someone dedicated to protect and serve.

Guyger remains hidden and is believed to be staying with his parents in Arlington.

He has not yet commented and has repeatedly refused to answer calls made by DailyMail.com.

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