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Daily ‘smart thermometer’ data shows that Florida and Maine are experiencing a resurgence in fever

As states in the United States continue to experience a decrease in fever during the coronavirus pandemic, Florida and Maine are experiencing a resurgence.

Kinsa Health, a medical technology company based in San Francisco, has followed suit daily fever measurements use data from smart thermometers connected to the internet.

According to one of Kinsa’s maps, which detects “atypical” diseases, most counties across the country are colored yellow, orange, or burnt orange to indicate low, mild, or moderate disease rates, respectively.

But Florida is the only state with counties colored red, indicating “high” rates of atypical disease.

It comes on the heels of Republican state governor Ron DeSantis, who orders all residents to stay home after weeks of adversity.

In addition, on a map showing whether diseases have increased or decreased in the past week, almost every county indicates a decrease – except in Maine, where most counties show an increase.

A daily temperature chart shows high rates of flu-like illness in Florida compared to the rest of the US (above)

A daily temperature chart shows high rates of flu-like illness in Florida compared to the rest of the US (above)

While fever is diminishing in most parts of the country, they are increasing in Maine, which has some of the lowest common cases of coronavirus (above)

While fever is diminishing in most parts of the country, they are increasing in Maine, which has some of the lowest common cases of coronavirus (above)

While fever is diminishing in most parts of the country, they are increasing in Maine, which has some of the lowest common cases of coronavirus (above)

Most counties in most states have “low,” “mild,” or “moderate” disease rates, but Florida is the only state with red-colored counties with “high” rates of flu-like illness. Pictured: Florida National Guardsmen walk past nurses who gather before tests for COVID-19 begin at the Orange County Convention Center, Orlando, April 1

Kinsa has distributed over a million thermometers and receives approximately 162,000 temperature readings per day.

The thermometers upload the temperatures to a database (similar to Apple iCloud) and users can add other symptoms to an app.

Before the tool was used to track COVID-19, Kinsa’s tool was usually used to track where seasonal flu outbreaks occur.

Traditionally, the company’s predictions are two or three weeks ahead of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

With the coronavirus pandemic, a new feature has been added to the map, which the company calls ‘atypical’ diseases.

HOW KINSA ANALYZES

Kinsa has a million smart thermometers across the country

Users record their temperature, which is then uploaded to a database

The company received approximately 162,000 daily measurements

People can then add other symptoms they experience to an app

The app provides advice on whether or not to consult the doctor

This follows up on diseases that do not match typical flu patterns and are likely due to the new coronavirus.

Influenza-like illnesses are shown in orange and red and where they are expected to be shown in blue.

Most counties in most states have “low,” “mild,” or “moderate” disease rates.

But Florida is the only state with red-colored counties that show “high” rates of flu-like illness, including Orange County, Palm Beach County, Broward County, and Miami-Dade County.

Experts have suggested that the Sunshine State is on track to become the next coronavirus epicenter in the U.S.

With millions of Americans heading south to escape winter or spring break – and test sites without a drive-through test – it can be a perfect storm for an increase in infections.

In addition, nearly four million seniors live in Florida, a major concern since the elderly are the most vulnerable to contracting the virus.

The new data follows the heels of Republican state governor Ron DeSantis, who orders all residents to stay home after weeks of adversity. Pictured: DeSantis attends a press conference in the parking lot of the Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens, March 30

The new data follows the heels of Republican state governor Ron DeSantis, who orders all residents to stay home after weeks of adversity. Pictured: DeSantis attends a press conference in the parking lot of the Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens, March 30

The new data follows the heels of Republican state governor Ron DeSantis, who orders all residents to stay home after weeks of adversity. Pictured: DeSantis attends a press conference in the parking lot of the Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens, March 30

It is feared that Florida will become the next coronavirus epicenter in the US due to the large older population and the number of Americans who went there to escape winter or spring break. Pictured: Beach access in Fort Myers is closed to the public due to COVID-March 19, 29

It is feared that Florida will become the next coronavirus epicenter in the US due to the large elderly population and the number of Americans who went there to escape winter or spring break. Pictured: Beach access in Fort Myers is closed to the public due to COVID-March 19, 29

It is feared that Florida will become the next coronavirus epicenter in the US due to the large elderly population and the number of Americans who went there to escape winter or spring break. Pictured: Beach access in Fort Myers is closed to the public due to COVID-March 19, 29

The rise in fever is surprising in Maine as the state has reported only 344 cases and seven deaths, some of the lowest numbers in the country. Pictured: Karen Haley cuts cotton fabric for masks to give to caregivers at the North Sails store in Freeport, Maine, March 23

The rise in fever is surprising in Maine as the state has reported only 344 cases and seven deaths, some of the lowest numbers in the country. Pictured: Karen Haley cuts cotton fabric for masks to give to caregivers at the North Sails store in Freeport, Maine, March 23

The rise in fever is surprising in Maine as the state has reported only 344 cases and seven deaths, some of the lowest numbers in the country. Pictured: Karen Haley cuts cotton fabric for masks to give to caregivers at the North Sails store in Freeport, Maine, March 23

In addition, earlier this week, a fever across the country fell, except here and there a province.

In fact, at this time of year, fever is about 63 percent lower than expected. Only about 1.14 percent have temperatures above 99F.

Social distance is decreasing the spread of feverish diseases across the country, ‘Kinsa wrote on his website on April 1.

Note: This does not mean that COVID-19 cases are decreasing. We even expect the reported cases to continue to increase in the short term. ‘

But today, on April 2, half of the counties in Maine were shaded yellow, with fever increasing by a small percentage.

Fever rose from 1.8 percent and 2.5 percent everywhere – surprisingly because the state reported only 344 cases and seven deaths, some of the lowest numbers in the country.

But there is good news. Most states showed a downward trend, which was indicated in four shades of blue – light blue with a fever that dropped by a small percentage and dark blue by a large percentage.

The West in particular – apart from California, Oregon and central Washington – experienced the largest drop, as much as 20 percent in some counties.

The Midwest – Illinois, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin – also showed similar declines.

“Since specific diagnostic tests are slowly turning us upside down, we’ll have to figure out other methods to find out where [the virus is] spread, “said Dr. Peter J Hotez, Dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, Tuesday at DailyMail.com.

‘I think [this] is a great method and it is a very robust technology. ‘

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