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Cute moment when a baby dingo plays with his ball after a great breeding year in Australia

Cute moment baby dingos play to their heart’s content after a huge breeding year despite a horror bushfire season

  • Victorian dingo reserve said they have experienced tremendous growth in puppy numbers
  • Dingo Discovery Sanctuary and Research Center said the cubs are unusually high
  • They usually expect a litter of three or four, but this year it was five to seven
  • Researchers believe that the breeding tree may be due to the bushfire season of the year

The heartwarming moment when a dingo cub plays with its siblings was filmed after the native Australian mammals had a huge breeding year despite wildfires.

Kevin Newman of the Dingo Discovery Sanctuary and Research Center in the Macedon Ranges in Victoria said the Australian bushfire season may be the cause of the breeding tree in the summer.

“Usually it is three or four nests [cubs] but this year they are five to seven. We’re not sure why the nests are so big, but we think it may be related to the smoke from the forest fire, ‘he said. The age.

Kevin Newman of the Dingo Discovery Sanctuary and Research Center in Victoria's Macedon Ranges said the Australian bushfire season in the summer may be the cause of the dingo breeding tree

Kevin Newman of the Dingo Discovery Sanctuary and Research Center in Victoria’s Macedon Ranges said the Australian bushfire season in the summer may be the cause of the dingo breeding tree

A visitor is seen playing with a dingo puppy after a breeding tree

A visitor is seen playing with a dingo puppy after a breeding tree

A visitor is seen playing with a dingo puppy after a breeding tree

The Sanctuary is home to 41 dingos from Australia’s desert, alpine, and tropical regions that have either been rescued, donated from other shrines, or bred downtown.

The shelter said they had nearly twice as many puppies in 2020 as they did last year.

“Most of the summer, the sanctuary was covered in smoke, so while we weren’t around fires, we were definitely struck by it,” Newman said.

Dingos breed during the winter season and larger litter numbers mean a higher chance of survival.

Jasmin Hufschmid, an associate professor of natural health at Melbourne University, said she would have assumed that bushfire smoke would lead to health complications for the dingo population and thus for smaller litters.

She said that different breeding pairs or genetic factors were a more likely cause.

The Sanctuary houses 41 dingos from Australia's desert, alpine and tropical regions that have been rescued, donated from other shrines or bred in the center

The Sanctuary houses 41 dingos from Australia's desert, alpine and tropical regions that have been rescued, donated from other shrines or bred in the center

The Sanctuary houses 41 dingos from Australia’s desert, alpine and tropical regions that have been rescued, donated from other shrines or bred in the center

Dingos breed during the winter season and larger litter numbers mean a higher chance of survival

Dingos breed during the winter season and larger litter numbers mean a higher chance of survival

Dingos breed during the winter season and larger litter numbers mean a higher chance of survival

However, she noted a theory that could explain the phenomenon related to the forest fires.

The terminal investment hypothesis states that animals in high stress environments will direct their energy towards reproduction to ensure the survival of their species.

“I think the theory is that younger animals are more likely to put their energy into their own survival because they are likely to breed along the road, where older animals are more likely to breed their efforts,” she said.

During the Australian summer of 2019/20, wildfires broke through the country, resulting in one of the worst fires recorded.

A visitor is seen cuddling a baby dingo while the Dingo Discovery Sanctuary and Research Center experiences a greenhouse wave

A visitor is seen cuddling a baby dingo while the Dingo Discovery Sanctuary and Research Center experiences a greenhouse wave

A visitor is seen cuddling a baby dingo while the Dingo Discovery Sanctuary and Research Center experiences a greenhouse wave

Investigations believe that the devastating bushfire season in Australia has led to an increase in dingo breeding

Investigations believe that the devastating bushfire season in Australia has led to an increase in dingo breeding

Investigations believe that the devastating bushfire season in Australia has led to an increase in dingo breeding

More than 18 million hectares of land were burned, more than 5,000 buildings were destroyed, and at least 34 people died in the crises.

In the aftermath of the fires, tens of millions of dollars have been raised for wildlife conservation efforts for native wildlife from people around the world.

The Dingo Discovery Sanctuary and Research Center will be closed to visitors for the next six weeks as the larger regions of Melbourne and Mitchell Shire have returned to a closed state following a wave of coronavirus cases.

Mr. Newman said he is confident that the sanctuary will welcome visitors again once restrictions are lifted.

More than 18 million acres of land were burned, more than 5,000 buildings were destroyed, and at least 34 people died in Australia's horror bushfire season (Photo: East Gippsland)

More than 18 million acres of land were burned, more than 5,000 buildings were destroyed, and at least 34 people died in Australia's horror bushfire season (Photo: East Gippsland)

More than 18 million acres of land were burned, more than 5,000 buildings were destroyed, and at least 34 people died in Australia’s horror bushfire season (Photo: East Gippsland)

What are dingoes?

  • Dingoes are Australia’s only native dog.
  • They are descended from Asian canids.
  • Found in most of mainland Australia – dingoes live in the wild for about 10 years.
  • They are naturally lean, weigh between 13 kg and 18 kg and are about 60 cm long.
  • Coats are often golden yellow, but they can be reddish, brown and black.
  • They live in groups of 10 or individuals (mostly male dingos).
  • Usually stay in one area but cover a large area.

Source: Bush Heritage

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