Crumpets vs Pikelets: Twitter is at war for the correct name for roasted snack

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Crumpets vs Pikelets: Twitter wages war over roasted snack name after Apprentice star Michelle Dewberry posts photo of her lunch

  • Social media took the rampage, with the word ‘crumpets’ trending on the site
  • Popular brands including Marmite, PG Tips and Lidl all got into the discussion
  • Michelle insisted that her snack was a pikelet, despite fierce criticism

A Twitter feud erupted today as the British debated the correct name for a toasted snack.

Former Apprentice star Michelle Dewberry sent social media into a frenzy when she posted a photo of her lunch.

Next to the image of her buttered snack, she wrote: ‘I eat these while I type (I’m great at multitasking) I can’t help but call these Pikelets, much to the disagreement of @ Sjopinion10 … What do you call them? ‘

The tweet sparked a huge discussion, with the word ‘crumpets’ eventually trending on the social media site.

The consensus seems to be that a pikelet is distinguished from a crumpet (pictured) in that it contains no yeast as a leavening agent, uses a thinner batter, and is cooked without a ring, giving it a flatter cake.

Pikelet

The tweet sparked a huge discussion, with the word ‘crumpets’ eventually trending on the social media site

Some of the UK’s biggest food and drink brands took part, with PG Tips setting up a poll that drew hundreds of votes.

Supermarket giant Lidl nailed its colors to the mast by boldly declaring: ‘Good morning to the people who call crumpets crumpets and just for you. ‘

Likewise, Marmite replied to Michelle by telling her, “Obviously there’s a little bit of Marmite missing on top of those … crumpets!”

The consensus seems to be that a pikelet is distinguished from a crumpet in that it contains no yeast as a leavening agent, uses a thinner batter and is cooked without a ring, giving it a flatter cake.

One user tried to demonstrate the difference and said to followers, ‘I make pikelets and crumpets from the same batter – it’s very active. Pikelets are free form in the pan and flatter, I put crumpets in a ring. Here they are both on a cooler. ‘

Another agreed, adding, ‘Sorry, you’re wrong, like so many others. Crumpets are thick, pikelets are thin … always been, always will be. ‘

And some suggested that the debate is just a regional one, describing the snack as a pikelet in many northern parts of England.

But Michelle, who won the second series of the BBC reality hit, The Apprentice, in 2006, stuck to her guns, following up on the tweet by writing, ‘Lol. #crumpets trending now.

Well done gang Unfortunately, for me (and seemingly many other sensible Northerners) these will always be #pikelets and nothing, and no one is going to change their mind. So there (and yes, the skinny ones can be Pikelets too, I don’t mind). ‘

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