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Plans for the two tight apartments in Purley, South London, showed spaces of just 90sq ft and 97sq ft beyond the Croydon council last year

A developer in Croydon was given permission to build a flat that was smaller than a London taxi after a shocking change in planning rules.

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Plans for the two tight apartments in Purley, South London, showed spaces of only 90sq ft and 97sq ft passed by the Croydon council last year.

The switch has been described by experts as the smallest allowed under rules for & # 39; allowed development & # 39; and is only two-thirds of most parking places.

It comes after landlords were found to have & # 39; allowed development rights & # 39; exploit to earn a fortune by turning offices into small apartments.

Plans for the two tight apartments in Purley, South London, showed spaces of just 90sq ft and 97sq ft beyond the Croydon council last year

Plans for the two tight apartments in Purley, South London, showed spaces of just 90sq ft and 97sq ft beyond the Croydon council last year

A studio in London must be 400sq ft but is not included for cohabitation arrangements as proposed in Purley.

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The developers are not confronted with the usual control under & # 39; allowed development & # 39; rights, there are no restrictions on the size of the flats and there are few ways to refuse applications, according to Times.

The construction of the Purley flats has not yet begun, but they are, among other things, plans for the building with an apartment with two beds on the ground floor that itself measures only 240 m².

Although this is a third of the area of ​​a flat under the normal building permit, the owner of the building, Andrew Weinstein, has other plans for a 300m² space with three bedrooms and a 280m² double bed on the first floor.

Head of housing research with architects Levitt Bernstein, Julia Park, said that the flats & # 39; ridiculously small & # 39; and that there was & # 39; more light in the corridor than in the flats & # 39 ;.

It also appeared that developers, the Cowell Group, had submitted plans for a warehouse to be converted into a block of 107 apartment buildings in Barnet, North London, but 56 of which had no outward facing windows.

The studios would fit into a bed, table, kitchen and small bathroom in a 140sq ft area, and 56 of the houses would look into an atrium in the building, with seven trees underneath.

Even the apartments that face out have only one window, some of which are expected to share a corridor with a row of offices, under the proposals of Adrian Levy and Nicholas Cowell, as well as rival developer Dandi Living.

The switch to 5 Russell Hill Parade, Purley, has been described by experts as the smallest allowed under & # 39; allowed development rules & # 39; and is only two-thirds of most parking places
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The switch to 5 Russell Hill Parade, Purley, has been described by experts as the smallest allowed under & # 39; allowed development rules & # 39; and is only two-thirds of most parking places

The switch to 5 Russell Hill Parade, Purley, has been described by experts as the smallest allowed under & # 39; allowed development rules & # 39; and is only two-thirds of most parking places

The move has been made, despite the fact that Mr. Cowell said earlier: & # 39; If you turn a terrible office building into apartments, you end up in apartments in a terrible office building. & # 39;

Mrs Park added: & # 39; Of the dozens of examples I have encountered, these are probably the worst, especially the Barnet scheme. & # 39;

But Ali Reza Ravenshad of Dandi Living claimed that his company would not build the squat flats and & # 39; the planning game & # 39; was playing.

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More windows would be added to the outside of the building after getting the normal building permit through a second application, he said.

These were allegedly rooms of approximately 260sq ft, aimed at people with a low income who would still get a window.

Complaints came against the flats, where the locals said the tight spaces could lead to mental health problems for residents.

The Barnet Society, which consists of residents, said it was a cynical exploitation of planning schedules – exacerbated by ignoring basic human needs.

The plans have not yet been approved, but the Barnett Council can only reject them if they find environmental problems such as floods, transport or noise.

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Mr. Weinstein did not respond to requests for comment from the Times and could not be reached by MailOnline.

The Cowell Group and Dandi Living said they & # 39; are proud of their track record of delivering high-quality, aesthetic and affordable homes.

& # 39; [De] development is at an early stage of a complex planning process and it is our intention to build a co-living plan of the highest quality. & # 39;

The people mentioned who are looking for a common living room in London will get rooms of at least 260 m².

The Croydon council said that environmental issues can affect planning requests, but the size of the rooms cannot be questioned.

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