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Critics criticize the Blasio for saying that NYC is safer with LESS people in prison

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio is criticized for saying that the emptying of prisons had made the city “safer” even as violent crime intensified.

De Blasio made the comments on Wednesday while signing a new law on police accountability, which includes a slew of measures under attack from police unions and officials.

When the bill was signed, the Blasio bragged about the policy of releasing suspects and perpetrators by hundreds from Rikers Island, including lifting bail for many crime categories.

“We now have fewer people in our prisons than ever since World War II, and we are safer and better for it,” said the mayor.

“We now have fewer people in our prisons than ever since World War II, and we are safer and better for it,” said the Blasio as he signed new local laws on Wednesday

The mayor’s critics slammed the comment, and Fox News presenter Sean Hannity called the Blasio “delusions” in a tweet.

Violent crime in New York has risen alarmingly in recent months, with data from NYPD showing shooting incidents in June rose 130 percent from the same month last year and reached their highest level since 1996.

Burglary increased by 118 percent in June and increased by 46 percent through June 30.

The murders rose 30 percent in June and rose 23 percent in the first six months of the year, the department said.

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea blamed the increase in crime on the policies released by Rikers Island inmates during the corona virus pandemic.

It follows a recent move that cut the $ 1 billion of the NYPD’s $ 6 billion annual budget.

Mayor Bill de Blasio, mid-white shirt, helps paint the new Black Lives Matter mural in the Bronx neighborhood of New York on Wednesday. Later, the Blasio signed a police bill while sitting at a desk on the street next to the mural

Mayor Bill de Blasio, mid-white shirt, helps paint the new Black Lives Matter mural in the Bronx neighborhood of New York on Wednesday. Later, the Blasio signed a police bill while sitting at a desk on the street next to the mural

Mayor Bill de Blasio, mid-white shirt, helps paint the new Black Lives Matter mural in the Bronx neighborhood of New York on Wednesday. Later, the Blasio signed a police bill while sitting at a desk on the street next to the mural

For the week ending July 12, the shooting incidents in NYC have been at their highest level since 1996

For the week ending July 12, the shooting incidents in NYC have been at their highest level since 1996

For the week ending July 12, the shooting incidents in NYC have been at their highest level since 1996

De Blasio stood on a stage that featured ‘Black Lives Matter’ and praised the package of new laws on Wednesday, including criminalizing the police who kneel on a suspect’s torso while tying them up.

The Black Lives Matter movement has been at the forefront of change in New York City and across our country. I am proud to sign these sweeping reforms in law and to honor the work they have done, ”said De Blasio.

However, the new laws came under fire from police unions and officials in New York and neighboring departments.

The general union council representing most of the NYPD agents called the new laws “more pro-criminal law that demonizes the police and complicates the enforcement of the law … the people of NYC continue to bear the consequences.”

Neighboring Westchester police issued an order on Thursday banning its officers from enforcement actions in New York City.

The warrant says that the provision that kneeling on a suspect’s torso makes it punishable to handcuff him makes it too dangerous to be arrested and Westchester officers chase the suspect into town.

The union representing the troopers of New York State has also called for the same reason to withdraw its officers from New York City.

The new law “places an unnecessary burden on our Troopers,” PBA president Thomas Mungeer said in a statement.

“It exposes them to criminal and civil liability for imprisonment of a person during a lawful arrest in a manner consistent with their education and legal in the rest of the state. In addition, this legislation will prevent Troopers from safely and effectively arresting resistant nationals, “he continued.

“I demand that New York State Police Superintendent Keith Corlett immediately remove all uniformed state forces currently stationed in New York City and cease all law enforcement activity within that jurisdiction,” Mungeer said.

About 200 state troops are currently assigned to roles in New York City.

NYPD chief of division Terence Monahan, who was injured this week in a police attack on the Brooklyn Bridge, has also objected to the law banning the pressure on a person’s chest or back.

“Anyone who has ever arrested someone who has fought and wrestled knows that chances are your knee will land on someone’s back,” Monahan said earlier this month, according to NY1. “It is a big problem for our police.”

Monahan called the new law “insane” and predicted that crime would continue to increase if the police are not to use violence against suspects who oppose arrest.

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