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The seriously endangered blue tail skinks (photo), with ADHD-like behavior, have been transported to their own small tropical island to protect them from predators

Rare lizards get their own TROPICAL ISLAND to save the species after the breeding program brought him back from the brink of extinction

  • About 300 lizards have found a new home 2,150 km from northwestern Australia
  • The nature authorities had caught only 66 of the bluetail tails in 2009
  • Predators claim to be responsible for endangering the species are wolf snakes
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Critically endangered blue-tailed skins have been transported to their own small tropical island in an attempt to protect the species from predators.

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About 300 of the lizards found a new home in Pulu Balan, which is part of the archipelago that is part of the Cocos (Keeling) Islands, 2150 kilometers off the northwest coast of Australia.

Nature authorities of Parks Australia caught only 66 skinks in 2009, but managed to increase the number to 1500 through a breeding program.

The predators responsible for the rapid decline of the lizards was the Southeast Asian wolf snake, which focused on Christmas Island where the species lived.

The seriously endangered blue tail skinks (photo), with ADHD-like behavior, have been transported to their own small tropical island to protect them from predators

The seriously endangered blue tail skinks (photo), with ADHD-like behavior, have been transported to their own small tropical island to protect them from predators

Nature authorities of Parks Australia caught only 66 skinks in 2009, but managed to increase the number to 1500 through a breeding program

Nature authorities of Parks Australia caught only 66 skinks in 2009, but managed to increase the number to 1500 through a breeding program

Nature authorities of Parks Australia caught only 66 skinks in 2009, but managed to increase the number to 1500 through a breeding program

About 300 of the lizards have found a new home on Monday in Pulu Balan, which is part of the archipelago that is part of the Cocos (Keeling) Islands, 2,150 kilometers off the northwest coast of Australia

About 300 of the lizards have found a new home on Monday in Pulu Balan, which is part of the archipelago that is part of the Cocos (Keeling) Islands, 2,150 kilometers off the northwest coast of Australia

About 300 of the lizards have found a new home on Monday in Pulu Balan, which is part of the archipelago that is part of the Cocos (Keeling) Islands, 2,150 kilometers off the northwest coast of Australia

Half of the skinks were transported from Christmas Island National Park.

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The other half was flown in from the Taronga Zoo in Sydney via a Virgin Australia plane.

The skinks are known to have ADHD type behavior, to measure around 10 centimeters and to weigh around 2.5 grams.

They have a rainbow-colored body, a golden front and back and a copper-colored burned red head.

Environment Minister Sussan Ley told Daily Mail Australia that the skinks would not have died out without the help of Parks Australia staff on Christmas Island.

& # 39; Now we have taken the next stop on the road to survival – a translocation in a wild environment to protect the bluetail of Christmas Island from extinction, & # 39; she said.

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Christmas Island National Park ranger Brendan Tiernan was part of the rescue mission in 2009, which saved 66 skinks before their population was wiped out.

& # 39; We hope to provide a safe hiding place for this beautiful captive species away from introduced predators such as wolf snakes, giant centipedes, rats and cats that decimated the species on Christmas Island, & # 39; he said.

The skinks are known to have ADHD type behavior, to measure around 10 centimeters and to weigh around 2.5 grams

The skinks are known to have ADHD type behavior, to measure around 10 centimeters and to weigh around 2.5 grams

The skinks are known to have ADHD type behavior, to measure around 10 centimeters and to weigh around 2.5 grams

Environment Minister Sussan Ley told Daily Mail Australia that the skinks would not have died out without the help of Parks Australia staff on Christmas Island

Environment Minister Sussan Ley told Daily Mail Australia that the skinks would not have died out without the help of Parks Australia staff on Christmas Island

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Environment Minister Sussan Ley told Daily Mail Australia that the skinks would not have died out without the help of Parks Australia staff on Christmas Island

Pulu Balan, the new home of the lizards, is believed to be free of predators.

Their main predator – the Southeast Asian wolf snake, also known as the Eastern wolf snake – is not toxic to humans.

The snake is named after their enlarged front teeth, which give the appearance of a dog.

They have a body with black, red-brown or dark gray speckles, as well as spots of white or pale yellow scattered on their scales.

The predators responsible for the rapid decline of the lizards was the Southeast Asian wolf snake, which focused on Christmas Island where the species lived
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The predators responsible for the rapid decline of the lizards was the Southeast Asian wolf snake, which focused on Christmas Island where the species lived

The predators responsible for the rapid decline of the lizards was the Southeast Asian wolf snake, which focused on Christmas Island where the species lived

Pulu Balan, the new home of the lizards, is believed to be free of predators

Pulu Balan, the new home of the lizards, is believed to be free of predators

Pulu Balan, the new home of the lizards, is believed to be free of predators

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) news (t) Christmas

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