Crisis worsens when the 85th case of measles is confirmed by a man returning to Australia from Vietnam

New alarms for measles: the crisis is getting worse in Australia as an 85th case of the infectious virus is confirmed in a man returning from Vietnam

  • Measles warning issued for Queensland, confirmation of the 13 case of the state this year
  • A man returned to Brisbane from Vietnam and was diagnosed with the virus
  • Queenslanders have been warned about the dangers of measles and travel
  • More than half of the cases diagnosed are linked to overseas travel

The measles crisis has worsened in Australia and a new warning has been issued for Queensland, with the newest infection bringing the national toll to date to 85.

A man who returned to Brisbane from Vietnam was diagnosed with the virus after visiting several public places in the city, the state's 13th case in 2019.

Queenslanders have been warned of the dangers of measles and overseas travel after more than half of the 13 cases were related to overseas travel.

A new measles warning has been issued for Queensland, confirming the 13th case of the highly contagious virus for the year (stock image)

A new measles warning has been issued for Queensland, confirming the 13th case of the highly contagious virus for the year (stock image)

Healthcare officials say that people born after 1965 – especially those planning overseas trips – should have two doses of the measles vaccine to ensure that they are fully protected.

& # 39; Every year we see measles cases in people who contract the infection overseas and then spread it while they are in Queensland & # 39 ;, said Jonathan Malo of the infectious diseases industry on Monday.

After returning from his trip, the infected man traveled from 1:30 pm to 2:30 pm on April 11 to Kedron Coles between 1:30 pm and 11:00 am and on April 13 at a dry cleaner in Wooloowin.

WHAT ARE THE POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS OF MAKING?

Most people recover from measles within one or two weeks, but sometimes complications can develop.

People who are most at risk are teenagers and adults, infants under the age of 1 year and children with a weakened immune system.

Common complications include diarrhea and vomiting, middle ear or eye infections, laryngitis, convulsions caused by fever, and lung infections such as pneumonia, bronchitis, and croup.

About one in fifteen infected children will develop one.

Less common complications are hepatitis, meningitis and a brain infection called encephalitis.

Rare complications include serious eye disorders that can lead to vision loss, heart and nervous system problems, and a fatal brain infection called subacute sclerosing pan-encephalitis – this is very rare and affects only one in 25,000 cases.

Having measles during pregnancy increases the risk that the baby has a low birth weight, premature birth or stillbirth or a miscarriage.

Source: NHS Choices

Health experts urge everyone who was at the sites at the time to be alert to the symptoms of measles.

This case brings the number of measles infections in Queensland this year to 13, only one less than the total number of measles cases in the state throughout the year 2018.

Australia registered a total of 2,013 confirmed measles cases in 2018 and only 81 in 2017.

The number of Australia-registered cases was last reported on April 8 at 84, and so far this is considered the 85th case.

Daily Mail Australia has contacted the Ministry of Health to confirm the updated number of cases in Australia.

NSW Health has given several measles warnings in the past two weeks after two babies were infected in Sydney and two unvaccinated Australians brought the disease in from Asia.

Health Minister Greg Hunt said that 95 percent of the community needs to be vaccinated to gain immunity from the herd to prevent the spread of the disease.

Dr. Jeremy McAnulty of NSW Health claimed the drastic increase in the number of cases that seriously caused Australia.

& # 39; We are really worried that it may catch on here, & # 39; he said to AAP.

Dr. McAnulty also said that the last wave of infection is the result of foreign travelers bringing in the disease from overseas.

Queenslanders have been warned of the dangers of measles and overseas travel after more than half of the 13 cases already diagnosed this year were related to overseas travel (stock image)

Queenslanders have been warned of the dangers of measles and overseas travel after more than half of the 13 cases already diagnosed this year were related to overseas travel (stock image)

Queenslanders have been warned of the dangers of measles and overseas travel after more than half of the 13 cases already diagnosed this year were related to overseas travel (stock image)

Australians could even catch the disease by just sitting at international airports, he claimed.

& # 39; People traveling to London and stopping in Dubai are exposed to a multitude of people from all over the world. & # 39;

It may take up to 10 days for symptoms of the disease to begin, but in others, rashes can occur within just four days.

Despite symptoms that do not appear immediately, people can get infected soon after being infected, Dr. McAnulty said, adding that the best prevention was immunization.

He said that anyone who is afraid of infection should report this directly to a doctor, rather than potentially infecting others in a waiting room.

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