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Cricket crowds behave better, but is a day in the game a bit boring?

Tens of years before the marketing experts decided how Australians wanted to enjoy their favorite sporting pastime, cricket crowds knew how to make their own fun.

There was no need for pop music, dance, fireworks or any of the other manufactured razzle-dazzle from Twenty20 luminaires – Test and a day crowd showed up to view and drink the piece.

In the 1970s, patrons were still allowed to bring Eskies full of beer to large cricket locations, as long as they limited themselves to one box per person per day.

During the five days of the fourth test in the 1974/75 Ashes series, Ash patrons reportedly drained 460,000 cans.

The limit for one case was lowered until it fell to two cans in the 1980s; towards the end of the decade the introduction of alcohol into the ground was stopped.

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Long before Cricket Australia's marketing experts decided how Australians wanted to enjoy their favorite summer hobby, crowds managed to make their own fun. This photo made by the famous social photographer Rennie Ellis is entitled 'Cricket Aftermath 1980s'. Until that decade, spectators at SCG could bring one case per person per day

Long before Cricket Australia’s marketing experts decided how Australians wanted to enjoy their favorite summer hobby, crowds managed to make their own fun. This photo made by the famous social photographer Rennie Ellis is entitled ‘Cricket Aftermath 1980s’. Until that decade, spectators at SCG could bring one case per person per day

Two of these young men enjoy a Foster's Lager, while their partner is resting at the cricket in 1982. The limit for one case per person per day of the SCG was lowered to two cans in the 1980s. Towards the end of the decade, the stopping of alcohol in the ground was stopped

Two of these young men enjoy a Foster's Lager, while their partner is resting at the cricket in 1982. The limit for one case per person per day of the SCG was lowered to two cans in the 1980s. Towards the end of the decade, the stopping of alcohol in the ground was stopped

Two of these young men enjoy a Foster’s Lager, while their partner is resting at the cricket in 1982. The limit for one case per person per day of the SCG was lowered to two cans in the 1980s. Towards the end of the decade, the stopping of alcohol in the ground was stopped

Tens of thousands of beer cans await removal from outside the Sydney Cricket Ground during the fourth test between Australia and the West Indies on January 7, 1976. During the five days of the fourth test in the Ashes 1974/75 series, SCG customers reportedly left 460,000 cans deflate

Tens of thousands of beer cans await removal from outside the Sydney Cricket Ground during the fourth test between Australia and the West Indies on January 7, 1976. During the five days of the fourth test in the Ashes 1974/75 series, SCG customers reportedly left 460,000 cans deflate

Tens of thousands of beer cans await removal from outside the Sydney Cricket Ground during the fourth test between Australia and the West Indies on January 7, 1976. During the five days of the fourth test in the Ashes 1974/75 series, SCG customers reportedly left 460,000 cans deflate

By the 1990s, spectators attending day-night games gathered in surrounding pubs when the doors opened at 10 a.m.

Teenagers smuggled bottles of alcohol. Streakers and other pitch invaders disturbed the game for a lark.

At the beginning of this century, groups of thirsty male customers worked in ‘beer wenches’ – young women dressed in bikinis who earned up to $ 65 per hour – to get them drinks from the busy bars on site all day.

For a while Mexican waves flew around Australian cricket fields and beach balls were bounced around the stands.

Drinkers joined empty plastic cups to form slinky overhead chains and broke a world record at the SCG in January 2013 by forming a “beer hose” over 100 meters long.

Beer noses, beach balls and beer snakes are now banned and Mexican waves are largely said goodbye.

The lawn of the SCG known as The Hill was covered with concrete and seats in 1991 and then replaced by the Victor Trump Stand. This photo of spectators on The Hill was made by Rennie Ellis in 1982

The lawn of the SCG known as The Hill was covered with concrete and seats in 1991 and then replaced by the Victor Trump Stand. This photo of spectators on The Hill was made by Rennie Ellis in 1982

The lawn of the SCG known as The Hill was covered with concrete and seats in 1991 and then replaced by the Victor Trump Stand. This photo of spectators on The Hill was made by Rennie Ellis in 1982

At the beginning of this century beer shutters became part of a day at the cricket. Groups of men rented bikini-clad women to get them beer all day. Backpackers are portrayed as beer drinks on the Sydney Cricket Ground in January 2003

At the beginning of this century beer shutters became part of a day at the cricket. Groups of men rented bikini-clad women to get them beer all day. Backpackers are portrayed as beer drinks on the Sydney Cricket Ground in January 2003

At the beginning of this century beer shutters became part of a day at the cricket. Groups of men rented bikini-clad women to get them beer all day. Backpackers are portrayed as beer drinks on the Sydney Cricket Ground in January 2003

Full strength beer in most general areas for large-scale recording has long been forgotten. Patterns are generally limited to buying four light or medium beers at the same time.

CCTV works in different locations, in some cases in combination with face recognition technology. Conversations can also be recorded.

Messages on customers who consider others, set themselves limits and set their pace, are regularly displayed on scoreboards. Smoking and vaping are prohibited everywhere.

Pitch invasion, curbed by prominent warnings against the act, threats of prohibitions and huge financial fines, is no longer a popular past.

Entering the playing field at the SCG raises a penalty to $ 5,500. Naked stripping and streaking across the floor are likely to result in an indictment of intentional and obscene exposure that can result in an additional fine of $ 1,100 and six months in prison.

A police officer grabs a fan's shirt at the Gabba in Brisbane during a one-day match between Australia and South Africa on January 20, 2002. Although the Gabba crowd could be noisy, the worst behavior was historically on SCG's Hill and in the MCG's Bay 13

A police officer grabs a fan's shirt at the Gabba in Brisbane during a one-day match between Australia and South Africa on January 20, 2002. Although the Gabba crowd could be noisy, the worst behavior was historically on SCG's Hill and in the MCG's Bay 13

A police officer grabs a fan’s shirt at the Gabba in Brisbane during a one-day match between Australia and South Africa on January 20, 2002. Although the Gabba crowd could be noisy, the worst behavior was historically on SCG’s Hill and in the MCG’s Bay 13

The great New Zealand bowling all-rounder, Sir Richard Hadlee, was unable to step onto an Australian field for most of the 1980s without encountering the singing of ‘Hadlee’s a wanker’.

Oral abuse of players or the use of offensive language is now likely to lead to police arrest or ejection by guards.

But do fans go to a Big Bash game in their latest Melbourne Renegades comic and enjoy themselves more than their shirtless predecessors in torn Stubbies and thongs?

Measures to improve the safety of spectators and players are very welcome, but some may wonder if a bit of color has been lost and whether beer wenches have really harmed.

The long gone website of beerwench.com stated that the company offered “only the most vibrant girls who match the personality of a beer girl” and insisted that sexual harassment should not be tolerated.

“Our clients are mostly athletes driven by his passion to view their favorite team, matched by his desire to be served by the most beautiful ladies, and of course drinking the best cold beers,” the website said.

Cricket fans at the Melbourne Cricket Ground throwing garbage include cans in the air while performing a Mexican wave in December 1988. Mexican waves, along with beach balls, are forbidden on large grounds for safety reasons.

Cricket fans at the Melbourne Cricket Ground throwing garbage include cans in the air while performing a Mexican wave in December 1988. Mexican waves, along with beach balls, are forbidden on large grounds for safety reasons.

Cricket fans at the Melbourne Cricket Ground throwing garbage include cans in the air while performing a Mexican wave in December 1988. Mexican waves, along with beach balls, are forbidden on large grounds for safety reasons.

Australian fans form a 'beer snake' made of empty plastic cups on The Hill in Adelaide Oval during the second Ashes test on December 1, 2006. Beer snakes are banned on large grounds because they disturb the view of spectators

Australian fans form a 'beer snake' made of empty plastic cups on The Hill in Adelaide Oval during the second Ashes test on December 1, 2006. Beer snakes are forbidden on large grounds because they disturb the view of spectators

Australian fans form a ‘beer snake’ made of empty plastic cups on The Hill in Adelaide Oval during the second Ashes test on December 1, 2006. Beer snakes are banned on large grounds because they disturb the view of spectators

Prospective beer friends who worked at other sporting events than cricket had to have “style, confidence, beauty and charm,” as well as “the ability to carry four drinks and cook a sausage.”

Beerwench.com provided girls with $ 60 per hour for a minimum of three hours, or $ 50 per hour for a package of two.

They were especially popular in Sydney and received a lot of publicity during the 2002/2003 season when England toured.

The presence of beer drunk that summer raged some citizens and New South Wales Gaming and Racing Minister Grant McBride said the practice sent the wrong message about the responsible service of alcohol.

“I am convinced that customers will often drink too much if they do not have to leave their seats,” said Mr. McBride.

“It is not clear how a responsible service of alcohol guidelines can be followed if a group of people pay $ 65 per hour for drinks purchased for them.”

English supporters wave flags at the Sydney Cricket Ground during the fifth Ashes test on January 15, 1987. The size of flags and banners that can be brought to cricket locations is now limited. Offensive slogans are also prohibited

English supporters wave flags at the Sydney Cricket Ground during the fifth Ashes test on January 15, 1987. The size of flags and banners that can be brought to cricket locations is now limited. Offensive slogans are also prohibited

English supporters wave flags at the Sydney Cricket Ground during the fifth Ashes test on January 15, 1987. The size of flags and banners that can be brought to cricket locations is now limited. Offensive slogans are also prohibited

Mr. McBride said that when the girls bought alcohol for a group of bar staff that served them, they could not judge whether the final customer was already drunk.

Mandi Brewster, the owner of the Sex Bomb Promotions beer drum, told the Sydney Morning Herald in December 2003 that all her girls were well trained in the responsible service of alcohol.

“I find it really hard for cricket fans to get drunk when served by my girls,” Brewster said. “By the time they go to the bar and back they don’t get too much to drink.

“There was a lot of fuss about beer diapers last year and I know there were people who wanted to ban us, but to be honest, I heard nothing more about it.”

Beer girl “Shannon” told the same publication that critics such as Mr. McBride were wrong.

“By using us, the boys drink a controlled drink,” Shannon said. “We encourage controlled drinking and I think he can put it in his ass.”

Australian fast bowler Merv Hughes warms up for the Melbourne Cricket Ground's Bay 13 while spectators mimic his movements during the first final of a one-day series against the West Indies on January 14, 1989. Hughes was a Bay 13 favorite

Australian fast bowler Merv Hughes warms up for Melbourne Cricket Ground's Bay 13 while spectators mimic his movements during the first final of a one-day series against the West Indies on January 14, 1989. Hughes was a Bay 13 favorite

Australian fast bowler Merv Hughes warms up for the Melbourne Cricket Ground’s Bay 13 while spectators mimic his movements during the first final of a one-day series against the West Indies on January 14, 1989. Hughes was a Bay 13 favorite

McBride warned the moment the Department of Gaming and Racing would revise the license terms to stop the wenches at the SCG and at other stadiums. The beer drinks disappeared in January 2004.

Test cricket attracts a different audience for one-dayers, which is different from those who go to T-20 games. Historically, the worst behavior at day-night was 50-over matches, and the worst of these was often the opening match of a series.

The grassy part of the SCG, known as The Hill, housed the rowdiest elements on that ground before it was covered with concrete and chairs in 1991 and then replaced by the Victor Trump Stand. The notorious Bay 13 on the Melbourne Cricket Ground attracted a similar crowd.

Sometimes the unmanageable element in those stands went way too far.

The first competition of the 1997/1998 one-day series at the SCG was marred by sections of the public swinging golf balls and bottles from the stands at the third mangrens.

Australian fast-bowling big Dennis Lillee (far right) holds a can of orange juice while some of his teammates drink cans of Tooheys Draft after losing the World Series Cricket final against the Rest of the World team at the SCG on February 4 , 1979. From left to right in uniform are Len Pascoe, Rod Marsh, Bruce Laird, Keppler Wessels and David Hookes

Australian fast-bowling big Dennis Lillee (far right) holds a can of orange juice while some of his teammates drink cans of Tooheys Draft after losing the World Series Cricket final against the Rest of the World team at the SCG on February 4 , 1979. From left to right in uniform are Len Pascoe, Rod Marsh, Bruce Laird, Keppler Wessels and David Hookes

Australian fast-bowling big Dennis Lillee (far right) holds a can of orange juice while some of his teammates drink cans of Tooheys Draft after losing the World Series Cricket final against the Rest of the World team at the SCG on February 4 , 1979. From left to right in uniform are Len Pascoe, Rod Marsh, Bruce Laird, Keppler Wessels and David Hookes

The South African spinner Pat Symcox was pelted with pieces of cooked chicken and champion all-rounder Jacques Kallis was hit by a tennis ball filled with water.

Proteas captain Hansie Cronje threatened to take his side of the field if fans didn’t stop throwing rockets.

“I don’t mind the anti-aircraft guns from the crowd,” Cronje said. “But I don’t want things to be thrown away.”

The following month, rugby league player Jason Taylor was seen live on national television and escorted from the same ground for unmanageable behavior during another ODI game.

The future NRL coach, soaked in beer, was with North Sydney teammates who had been to a buck’s party the previous day and it was claimed that some of them peeed in cups and threw the contents to other customers.

Taylor was dropped that year as Australia’s ambassador.

Modern cricket crowds behave better than the spectators in the past. Pictured are fans dressed to see a one-day international between Australia and Bangladesh at the Bundaberg Stadium in Cairns on August 2, 2003

Modern cricket crowds behave better than the spectators in the past. Pictured are fans dressed to see a one-day international between Australia and Bangladesh at the Bundaberg Stadium in Cairns on August 2, 2003

Modern cricket crowds behave better than the spectators in the past. Pictured are fans dressed to see a one-day international between Australia and Bangladesh at the Bundaberg Stadium in Cairns on August 2, 2003

In January 1999, the great Shane Warne had to come out of the Australian locker room to plead for an MCG crowd of over 82,000 to stop throwing rockets in a one-day game against England.

Spectators had thrown golf balls and beer bottles onto the field, stopping the game for five minutes when the game was almost stopped.

The English caption Alec Stewart called on Warne, who walked into the field with a helmet to calm the drunken crowd after a series of Mexican waves got out of hand.

Rugby league player Jason Taylor is removed from the SCG during a one-day international in January 1997. The future NRL coach was on the ground with North Sydney teammates

Rugby league player Jason Taylor is removed from the SCG during a one-day international in January 1997. The future NRL coach was on the ground with North Sydney teammates

Rugby league player Jason Taylor is removed from the SCG during a one-day international in January 1997. The future NRL coach was on the ground with North Sydney teammates

There was another night of shame at the MCG in 2002, this time when Australia played New Zealand in a game with limited overs when sections of the audience were amok.

More than 20 spectators were accused of mistreatment, battery and drunkenness, while 250 were evicted for violations such as throwing rockets, invading the field and using foul language.

Most rockets were plastic bottles and fruit, but broken glass was also found in the field. Many of the perpetrators were in Bay 13 of the Great Southern Stand.

The game was stopped for 10 minutes when Kiwi Mark Richardson, fielding on the third mangrens, was constantly attacked. When Richardson returned to his field position, he was wearing a helmet.

A young Australian supporter was hit on the head from behind when he left the ground. The teenager became unconscious and suffered a broken jaw, broken teeth and internal injuries.

After the competition, which won New Zealand, touring captain Stephen Fleming warned that he would never bring his team back to the MCG unless their safety could be guaranteed.

MCG CEO Stephen Grough said such chaos had been a regular problem for the first day of the day in the ODI series during various summers.

Australian vice-captain Adam Gilchrist described the scenes as “disturbing” and said there were only so many police and game managers could do.

“Ultimately, it’s the people who come to watch the game and have to take responsibility,” Gilchrist said.

Inspector Bob Clegg of Victoria Police said: “Some spectators clearly came to the game without the intention of looking at the cricket and only to disturb viewing for others.”

New Zealand fieldman Mark Richardson speaks with a police officer after objects are thrown at him by the MCG crowd during a one-day game against Australia on January 11, 2002. The game was stopped during the outage before New Zealand won with 23 runs

By the following summer, the MCG was rated as the home of one of the three worst-turned crowds in world cricket, which led to Ricky Ponting recording a message to be played on the scoreboard.

“I hope you have a good time, but please ensure the safety of the players and your fellow fans,” Ponting pleaded.

The Melbourne Cricket Club, which manages the MCG, introduced non-alcoholic zones after the Richardson incident, although Gough did not believe that drunkenness was the main cause of the Liege behavior.

“I don’t see alcohol as the main driver,” he said. ‘They are often just end-of-year high jumps, the start of a cricket season high jump, and you get a lot of enthusiasm.

“Unfortunately, part of it blends into causing interruptions or annoying value for the rest of the crowd.”

Shane Warne, who was then a Victorian captain, defended the MCG and its crowds.

“I don’t think the Victorian bustle is the worst in the world, certainly not,” Warne said.

“I think the Victorian audience and the MCG audience are absolutely sensational. I think they are just behind Australia. “

WHAT YOU CAN AND CAN’T DO WITH THE CRICKET

Cricket grounds are locations with a permit, so the usual rules about behavior in pubs apply. Stunned customers are not allowed and anyone who is supposed to behave disorderly is removed.

Generally speaking, the public cannot buy more than four beers at a time – and sometimes fewer – while in most general admission sections only large-scale beer is available on large grounds.

Administrative authority Cricket Australia also sets the entry conditions and dictates what is acceptable during competitions it controls.

The rules of Cricket Australia include banning balloons, beach balls or any other inflatable device, as well as participation “in any way in a Mexican golf.”

Those entering a site must accept that attending a competition entails the risk of death, broken bones, injury to joints or limbs, embezzlement or fainting, sunburn, cuts and scrapes.

The Sydney Cricket and Sports Ground Trust operates under its own Act of Parliament and has its own rules.

Visitors are subjected to security screening and “to protect the safety of all persons, the Trust reserves the right to change security screening requirements and prohibit items at its sole discretion and without notice.”

“All movements of persons when entering the site will be monitored by security systems such as but not limited to CCTV and video worn on the body,” says the website of SCG Trust.

“For safety and security purposes, face recognition technology in combination with CCTV is active in this area.”

Conversations can also be recorded. Smoking and vaping are prohibited anywhere in the ground. Unattended bags are considered suspicious items until proven otherwise.

Patterns must not display behavior that is directed at a player, match officer or other patron in a manner that offends, insults, humiliates, intimidates, threatens, discredits or defrauds them based on their race, color, religion, sexuality, decent , nationality or ethnic background.

Regulations even dictate what a spectator can wear.

“Employees, clients and visitors are not permitted to wear or otherwise display unauthorized commercial (ambush marketing), political or other offensive logos or signposting,” the SCG website says.

The list of items that may not be placed in the ground includes alcoholic beverages, illegal drugs, glass bottles, metal containers, aluminum cans or other fragile barrels.

Chairs, stools or furniture are not permitted, nor is it possible to ‘any large item that does not fit under a chair’.

Flags or banners larger than 1 meter by 1 meter are not allowed and musical instruments, whistles, horns and sirens must be left at home.

According to the Trust, text or images on flags or banners may not be ‘offensive, discriminatory or intimidating in nature’.

While it was once players who could be hit by projectiles, patrons are now being warned that the Trust has no responsibility if they are injured by cricket balls being hit in seats.

The lists banned by MCG are similar to those for the SCG, but add torn paper.

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