Creepy AI transfers facial expressions in videos

An AI transfers facial expressions from one person to another to create videos

A creepy AI transfers facial expressions from one person to another to create "fake deep" phantasmagoric videos.

The software changes exactly one segment of a video, like the mouth of one character, in the style of another to create realistic false clips.

A video produced by the team transferred the movements of the mouth of the British comedian John Oliver to the face of the presenter of the American talk show Stephen Colbert.

The researchers warned that the technology could be used to create fake news clips that falsely put words in the mouths of politicians or other powerful figures.

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An AI transfers facial expressions from one person to another to create strangely realistic "deep false" videos. He was able to flip the movements of several celebrities' mouths (input) into other well-known figures (output) to make them look as if they were saying things that were not

Scientists at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh developed a new type of AI called Recycle-GAN for their study.

It is based on a type of AI algorithm called GAN, which means adversarial generative network.

GAN faces one AI against another, the first generates new videos and the second analyzes and qualifies its quality before sending it back to the original robot.

Through thousands of calculations, the couple eventually become experts in their determined task.

The new study added an additional step to making a GAN that created incredibly realistic fake videos.

The new method makes a cycle between the two, how to translate English to Spanish and then Spanish to English, to verify that it still makes sense.

Technology could one day be useful for film producers, making jobs such as dubbing or converting black and white films very simple.

But researchers also recognized that face-exchanging AIs have potentially disastrous consequences if used in the wrong hands.

"It was a revelation to all of us in the field that such fakes would be created and have a huge impact," said study co-author Aayush Bansal.

& # 39; Find ways to detect them will be important to move forward & # 39;

HOW DOES AI-SWAPPING AI WORK?

A team led by scientists from Stanford University has created an AI that can exchange the facial movements of one person in a video with the theme of another.

The AI ​​works by first analyzing the intricate facial movements of a target, whose resemblance will be used in the fake video.

Select the inclinations of the head of the objective, the movement of the eyes, the details of the mouth, the flickers and learn their typical movements.

Then, the software analyzes these same reference points on one side in a source video: that whose movements will be exchanged with the target.

After capturing the nuanced facial movements of the source, the AI ​​reproduces them using the natural expressions of the target.

This creates a surprisingly realistic false clip because the movements of the face and the normal ticks of the target are emulated.

The AI ​​learns to use an adverse neural network, a relatively new kind of AI that trains quickly to recognize patterns in the data.

Two AIs launch against each other, one to create and the other to analyze, in a chain of millions of round-trip adjustments.

This makes the learning process faster and more accurate than if a human were to analyze each of the AI ​​attempts.

This is not the first time that a GAN is used to make fake celebrity videos.

A shocking false video that seemed to show the former president of the USA. US, Barack Obama, calling Donald Trump a "full and complete dips ***" went viral in April.

Comedian and actor Jordan Peele made the video to warn the US public about fake videos using AI.

The technology could one day be useful for film producers, making jobs such as dubbing or converting black and white films easily colored

The technology could one day be useful for film producers, making jobs such as dubbing or converting black and white films easily colored

The technology could one day be useful for film producers, making jobs such as dubbing or converting black and white films easily colored

Peele's voice and mouth were digitally inserted into the video using sophisticated technology driven by artificial intelligence, called & # 39; deepfakes & # 39 ;.

"We are entering an era in which our enemies can make it seem like everyone says something at any time, even if they never said that," Obama said in the video.

"Then, for example, they could make me say things like, I do not know, [Black Panther’s] Killmonger was right, or Ben Carson is in the sunken place.

"Or, how about this: simply, President Trump is a complete and complete idiot."

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