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The police shared a number of images on their Facebook page under the #loadfail because motorists could not secure the items of their vehicles. Here an inflatable flamingo is tied to the roof of a car

What nonsense: police photo & # 39; s shooting shame drivers caught carrying a number of VERY bizarre items – including an inflatable flamingo and an ute full of air with car parts

  • The New South Wales police have shared a number of images under the hashtag #loadfail
  • Photos show drivers carrying dangerous and bizarre loads on busy roads
  • The hashtag campaign of the police was intended to draw attention to drivers on the roads
  • Drivers who are caught with unsecured loads are confronted with three penalty points and a $ 439 fine
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Drivers have been caught carrying a number of bizarre and dangerous loads on their cars on Australian roads.

The police shared a number of images on their Facebook page under the #loadfail because motorists could not secure the items of their vehicles.

Images showed items such as planks of wood and an inflatable flamingo tied to cars in New South Wales.

The police shared a number of images on their Facebook page under the #loadfail because motorists could not secure the items of their vehicles. Here an inflatable flamingo is tied to the roof of a car

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The police shared a number of images on their Facebook page under the #loadfail because motorists could not secure the items of their vehicles. Here an inflatable flamingo is tied to the roof of a car

Another image showed an ute with two boats tied up on the roof on a busy New South Wales road

Another image showed an ute with two boats tied up on the roof on a busy New South Wales road

Another image showed an ute with two boats tied up on the roof on a busy New South Wales road

The images attracted a lot of attention from social media users and some thought the view was scary.

& # 39; Really, there are so many stupid people with licenses & # 39 ;, one user wrote.

& # 39; That's extremely dangerous on a windy day when he lets some people run peanuts in their brains, & # 39; another said about a man with a boat hull tied to his car.

& # 39; I would not want to drive behind him / her! & # 39; added a third.

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One photo shows a high placed drawer with the panels of cars without ropes or tires to keep the load in sight.

Another ute is seen with 17 pallets that are stacked high and tilt sideways with only three small ropes over the top that hold it in place.

A large number of images shared by the police seem to show people dragging large pieces of wood from the back and sides of their car while on busy roads.

Another ute is seen with 17 pallets stacked high and tilt sideways with only three small ropes over the top that hold it in place

Another ute is seen with 17 pallets stacked high and tilt sideways with only three small ropes over the top that hold it in place

Another ute is seen with 17 pallets stacked high and tilt sideways with only three small ropes over the top that hold it in place

According to the NSW Roads & Maritime Services, loads must be covered to secure and contain all materials in the vehicle and trailer
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According to the NSW Roads & Maritime Services, loads must be covered to secure and contain all materials in the vehicle and trailer

According to the NSW Roads & Maritime Services, loads must be covered to secure and contain all materials in the vehicle and trailer

In New South Wales, unsecured loads can result in a penalty of three penalty points and a penalty of $ 439.

According to the NSW Roads & Maritime Services, loads must be covered to secure & contain all materials in the vehicle and trailer & # 39 ;.

"A load may not protrude more than 150 mm beyond the width of the trailer or more than 2.5 m total width, whichever is less," said an RMS statement.

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& # 39; For loads that protrude more than 1.2 m behind a trailer, a red flag must be attached to the end of the load. & # 39;

The NSW law stipulates that a load of a vehicle must be loaded in such a way that the vehicle does not become unstable or unsafe.

A load may not protrude more than 150 mm beyond the width of the trailer or over the total width of more than 2.5 m

A load may not protrude more than 150 mm beyond the width of the trailer or over the total width of more than 2.5 m

A load may not protrude more than 150 mm beyond the width of the trailer or over the total width of more than 2.5 m

A load may not protrude more than 150 mm beyond the width of the trailer or over the total width of more than 2.5 m

A load may not protrude more than 150 mm beyond the width of the trailer or more than 2.5 m total width

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The NRMA has a list of tips for people to secure their cargo in a correct and safe way.

They comprise 80 percent of the weight of the load in the forward direction, 50% of the weight sideways and backwards and another 20% of the weight vertically.

In February, a 60-year-old woman from Queensland was seriously injured when she was impaled by a metal pole of an unsecured load that broke through her windshield.

Police told the Brisbane Times that the metal pipe fell out of the vehicle before it bounced off the road, through the windshield and into the woman's chest.

She was brought to the hospital in a stable condition and recovered from the injury.

TIPS FOR TRANSPORTING A LARGE LOAD

The safety of your load, your life and the lives of others depends on the correct load control.

Your load must be covered at all times.

Use a vehicle and suitable security equipment suitable for the type of load you are carrying.

Check your load bracket immediately before departure and during the journey.

You drive under different, more difficult circumstances when you transport certain types of loads.

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Source: NRMA

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