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Covid continues to crash, so how prevalent is the virus in YOUR area?

Covid levels continued to crumble in England last week, falling to their lowest levels since early December before Omicron took off.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) estimates that 1.2 million, or one in 45 people, were carrying the virus on any given day of the week as of May 7, a quarter fewer than the previous week.

It marks the fifth week in a row that the ONS weekly survey of infections, now the best barometer of the outbreak, is reporting a weekly drop in cases, despite no Covid restrictions in place.

The government is banking on the study, based on swabs from 120,000 random people, to track the virus now that free testing has been removed for the vast majority of Britons.

Today’s estimate for England is the lowest since the week ending December 16, when 1.2 million people were also estimated to be infected.

At the time, the Omicron strain was just beginning to take off and in the following weeks there were growing calls to follow some EU countries in enforcing another lockdown.

Ministers also resisted fresh calls from NHS chiefs to impose tighter restrictions last month when variant BA.2, an offshoot of Omicron, pushed rates to record highs.

Meanwhile, the ONS estimates that one in 35 people carried Covid in Wales and Scotland last week and one in 55 in Northern Ireland.

Write your local area below to see the % of people who had Covid last week

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) estimates that 1.2 million, or one in 45 people, were carrying the virus on any given day of the week as of May 7, a quarter fewer than the previous week.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) estimates that 1.2 million, or one in 45 people, were carrying the virus on any given day of the week as of May 7, a quarter fewer than the previous week.

The ONS estimates that one in 35 people carried Covid in Wales and Scotland last week and one in 55 in Northern Ireland.

The ONS estimates that one in 35 people carried Covid in Wales and Scotland last week and one in 55 in Northern Ireland.

Rates have started to stabilize in London and the East Midlands, but are falling everywhere else in England.

Rates have started to stabilize in London and the East Midlands, but are falling everywhere else in England.

The rates still appear to be falling considerably in adults, but the trends are less certain in children.

The rates still appear to be falling considerably in adults, but the trends are less certain in children.

Sarah Crofts, head of analytical results for the COVID-19 Infection Survey, said: “It is encouraging to see infections continue to decline across the UK, with rates now at their lowest level since mid-December.”

“In England, while infections are around a third of the level seen a month ago, rates remain high overall. I want to thank all of our participants for their continued dedication to this vital piece of surveillance.

Wales has seen infections fall for the fourth consecutive week, with an estimated 88,300 people with Covid in the week to May 7, down from 131,600, and also the lowest level since the week to December 16.

No10’s independent Covid inquiry will investigate the impact of lockdowns on mental health and young people

No10’s long-awaited Covid investigation will examine how badly the lockdowns affected the nation’s mental health and children.

Officials revealed on Thursday that the scope of the independent investigation would be expanded to include the broader impacts of the pandemic restrictions.

There were fears that the investigation fell into the same trap as previous reports which focused on lives lost directly to Covid and ruled that the UK should have been locked down for longer.

Since then, data has accumulated suggesting that the benefits of the lockdowns were overstated and the broader consequences underestimated.

The investigation, which already included 26 topics, is chaired by Baroness Heather Hallett. She will have the power to call witnesses to testify under oath, including the prime minister.

After reviewing more than 20,000 responses to its original draft terms of reference last month, the main complaint was that they were too narrow.

Research will now also examine the uneven impact of the pandemic on minority ethnic groups and collaboration between decentralized administrations.

Children faced massive disruptions to their education during the pandemic, despite being at very small risk of contracting the virus.

Psychiatrists have described the pandemic as the “biggest blow” to mental well-being in generations, following a record 4.3 million mental health referrals in 2021.

Meanwhile, in Scotland, Covid infections are now at their lowest point since the week ending December 23, with 158,200 people infected last week.

The virus is less prevalent in Northern Ireland, where infections have fallen to their lowest level since early November.

In the most recent week, the percentage of people who have tested positive continued to decline in all regions of England, but there are some signs that the drop is leveling off in London and the East Midlands.

The virus remains most prevalent in the East Midlands, where 2.7 percent, or one in 37, were infected last week, followed by the North West, where it was one in 41. Yorkshire and the South East had rates higher than English. average – 2.3 percent, or one in 43.

London and the North East have the lowest rates, with just one in 52 people estimated to have been sick with covid.

The percentage of people who tested positive for coronavirus also decreased across all age groups in England, except for those in School Year 7 to School Year 11, for whom the trend was uncertain.

Rates were still highest among those ages 50 to 69 (2.6 percent) and those over 70 (2.4 percent).

It comes after the Government stopped publishing daily Covid statistics earlier this week. There have been growing calls for figures on infections, hospital admissions and deaths to be scrapped after free testing was scrapped and the country moved into the ‘living with Covid’ phase of the pandemic.

Meanwhile, it was revealed yesterday that No10’s long-awaited Covid investigation will examine how badly the lockdowns affected the nation’s mental health and children.

Officials said the scope of the independent investigation would be expanded to include the broader impacts of the pandemic restrictions.

There were fears that the investigation fell into the same trap as previous reports which focused on lives lost directly to Covid and ruled that the UK should have been locked down for longer.

Since then, data has accumulated suggesting that the benefits of the lockdowns were overstated and the broader consequences underestimated.

The investigation, which already included 26 topics, is chaired by Baroness Heather Hallett. She will have the power to call witnesses to testify under oath, including the prime minister.

After reviewing more than 20,000 responses to its original draft terms of reference last month, the main complaint was that they were too narrow.

Research will now also examine the uneven impact of the pandemic on minority ethnic groups and collaboration between decentralized administrations.

Children faced massive disruptions to their education during the pandemic, despite being at very small risk of contracting the virus.

Psychiatrists have described the pandemic as the “biggest blow” to mental well-being in generations, following a record 4.3 million mental health referrals in 2021.

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