Covid Australia: Jacqui Lambie’s controversial incentive for fully vaccinated Australians

Jacqui Lambie reveals controversial incentive she will bring to fully vaccinated people as calls for Australia to open up to the stinging surge over fears Australia won’t be worth living in

  • Jacqui Lambie appeared on the Today show on Thursday to discuss vaccinations
  • Tasmanian Prime Minister calls for reopening when 80 per cent vaccinated
  • She said she would boost the Covid jab with joints and Krispy Kreme donuts


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Tasmanian Senator Jacqui Lambie has revealed the controversial incentives she would consider introducing for fully vaccinated people as fears grow that Australia is ‘not worth living in’ if prolonged lockdowns continue.

Ms Lambie is calling on states to follow the federal government’s plan to reopen once 80 per cent of Australians over 16 have received both doses of the Covid shot.

The MP said failing to ease restrictions once vaccination rates hit targets would have devastating consequences for Australians, and politicians would have to weigh the social and economic damage against the health effects of the virus.

“We have to find a middle ground and it happens with mental health issues and suicides and the other damage it does,” she told the Today show on Thursday.

Host Alison Langdon said states in the US offered their residents shotguns, donuts and joints to roll up their sleeves.

Tasmanian Senator Jacqui Lambie (pictured) calls on states to reopen once 80 percent of Australians over 16 are fully vaccinated

Tasmanian Senator Jacqui Lambie (pictured) calls on states to reopen once 80 percent of Australians over 16 are fully vaccinated

When asked if Australia could take measures like those in the US, Ms Lambie said she would be tempted to get the shot in exchange for donuts and joints.

“I’ll have the joint first and then my Krispy Kremes later when I have the munchies,” she said.

Radio personality Chris Smith said fully vaccinated Australians should now be given liberties otherwise ‘what’s the point of getting the vaccine’.

The 2GB host said the country must reopen soon or the economic fallout from lockdowns will ‘make Australia not worth living in’.

‘When do we open? Do we wait six or seven years to open? We will have no land. Everyone will lose their job. There will be no trade. It’s not worth living in,” he told the program.

Ms Lambie said she appreciated that those who have received both vaccines are getting ‘crabby’, they have to wait for the rest of the nation to catch up before they get liberties.

However, she said it was necessary for the well-being of Australians that vaccination coverage was high before restrictions were eased.

“I think we’re all getting a little cranky, those who got lucky with that second vaccination,” she said.

“It really pisses people off when they come up to me and say, ‘I’ve had my two shots, where are my freedoms?’ Unfortunately, people have to realize that because you’ve had two shots, you won’t get your freedoms the next day.’

“We have to wait for people to catch up. Many have yet to catch up. We have to make sure we respect that. We’re going to look for another two or three months to get to that point. That’s an unfortunate move, but that’s the way it is.’

Ms Lambie said she doesn’t think it’s a good idea to relax restrictions as the Covid numbers “go through the roof” in NSW, which reported a record high of 919 daily cases on Wednesday.

Ms Lambie said the fully vaccinated people are becoming 'crabby', they have yet to be given liberties, but said it is important that Australians wait until vaccination rates are high.  Pictured: An HSC student gets a vaccine in Sydney

Ms Lambie said the fully vaccinated people are becoming 'crabby', they have yet to be given liberties, but said it is important that Australians wait until vaccination rates are high.  Pictured: An HSC student gets a vaccine in Sydney

Ms Lambie said the fully vaccinated people are becoming ‘crabby’, they have yet to be given liberties, but said it is important that Australians wait until vaccination rates are high. Pictured: An HSC student gets a vaccine in Sydney

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