Covid Australia: Gladys Berejiklian rejects calls for curfew in western Sydney

Gladys Berejiklian has rejected calls for a curfew in locked-down Sydney, saying there’s no evidence it would work.

The NSW Prime Minister is facing calls from all sides to tighten Sydney’s lockdown, including imposing a curfew like Melbourne did last year.

The outbreak of the highly contagious Delta strain in Sydney does not appear to be ending, with 145 more cases registered on Monday.

Ms Berejiklian explained that her “mission is to allow our citizens to live as safely and freely as possible” at a press conference on Monday when a journalist interrupted him.

“Would you rule out a curfew?” he shouted from the crowd.

“They haven’t shown that they work,” she replied.

There is no curfew in place in Sydney under lockdown restrictions, as seen here in Bondi

Melbourne’s 112-day lockdown last year banned residents from leaving their homes between 8pm and 5am for reasons other than work and emergencies.

The rule caused a stir, especially after chief health official Brett Sutton denied it was based on his medical advice.

Victorian Prime Minister Daniel Andrews eventually admitted that the curfew was only imposed because it would make it easier for the police to police.

“The rules were ultimately made by me,” Mr Andrews said at the time.

‘It’s no business for Brett [Sutton]That’s not health advice, it’s about achieving a health outcome.

His advice is ‘do what you can to limit movement’. The police then say “we need rules that we can enforce”. These are decisions that are ultimately made by me.

Pictured: Melbourne's Hosier Lane amid nighttime curfews, as the city turned ghost town

Pictured: Melbourne’s Hosier Lane amid nighttime curfews, as the city turned ghost town

Daniel Andrews (pictured) faced backlash last year when he imposed a curfew on Victorians without the help of medical experts

Daniel Andrews (pictured) faced backlash last year when he imposed a curfew on Victorians without the help of medical experts

“It means no one sneaks out to go to their partner’s house. Nobody does things that are not allowed by law.’

But Chief Constable Shane Patton came out in September and said police never asked for a curfew and were told only a “few hours” before it started.

“I was never consulted,” Patton told 3AW radio. “We never asked for a curfew. It’s not a decision I was involved in.”

But despite this history of curfews with no evidence of success or medical support, NSW Chief Health Officer Kerry Chant was also questioned about a possible one in Sydney.

She was asked whether imposing a curfew and reducing the distance Sydneysiders can travel outside their home to exercise from 10km to 5km would affect the number of cases.

Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian (pictured) would not specify when Sydney lockdown would end

Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian (pictured) would not specify when Sydney lockdown would end

Pictured: People in South West Sydney in July - the new epicenter of Sydney's latest outbreak

Pictured: People in South West Sydney in July – the new epicenter of Sydney’s latest outbreak

dr. Chant didn’t immediately comment on the idea of ​​a curfew, but said residents were already limited in where they could go and officials around the world would look into prevention measures before changing rules.

‘We need [to keep] a very tight lockdown to reduce the numbers and we also need to do more – the ‘more’ is to work very closely in a supportive way with a community led model for the affected communities, and we also need vaccination ‘, she said. .

Ms Berejiklian didn’t rule out tougher restrictions on Sydneysiders living in hotspots like Fairfield and Lakemba, but she kept quiet about what those new rules might be.

She said that households and workplaces are still important areas for community transmission, but data shows that people were following the rules.

“There is no doubt that some restrictions have a better effect than others and that is the advice we will be getting from our health experts, as well as in consultation with other officials,” she said.

Pictured: A woman in Strathfield on Monday morning.  Gladys Berejiklian ruled out the idea of ​​a curfew

Pictured: A woman in Strathfield on Monday morning. Gladys Berejiklian ruled out the idea of ​​a curfew

dr.  Kerry Chant (pictured left) did not immediately react to the idea of ​​a curfew on Monday

dr. Kerry Chant (pictured left) did not immediately react to the idea of ​​a curfew on Monday

Sydney is set to leave lockdown on July 30, but the Berejik government on Sunday requested financial models that would assess the devastating effect of extending restrictions until September 17.

“Maybe we need to push harder in some areas and let go of other institutions,” she said.

Of the 145 cases announced Monday, 55 have been linked to domestic contacts of known cases, and nine were other close contacts.

“Over the next few days, we will continue to look at existing institutions to give people certainty about what life will be like in New South Wales after July 31,” the prime minister said.

‘It’s very important that people don’t leave the house unless they absolutely have to and especially don’t interact with each other.

September 3 was initially mentioned as a possible date to end the lockdown, The Australian reported, but that could be postponed even further in light of the relentlessly rising number of cases and hospitalizations.

Ms Berejiklian suggested restrictions could be eased in some areas depending on where the highest number of new cases are located – the highest concentration in recent months has been in southwestern Sydney.

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