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COVID-19: The number of people taken to hospital with coronavirus symptoms has skyrocketed and experts are concerned

Fear of outbreak is on the rise: number of people rushed to hospital with coronavirus symptoms increasing, while officials warn more will die

  • Australia registered 66 more cases as of Friday morning – they are all from Victoria
  • Twenty-six people are hospitalized with coronavirus and seven in ICUs
  • Victoria’s Chief Medical Officer said more deaths are expected with more cases

Experts have warned that more people will die from the coronavirus as the number of active cases in Australia increases.

Victoria registered an additional 66 cases on Friday, with 22 people hospitalized.

Six of them remain in intensive care, while another two remain in the hospital in New South Wales.

Experts are concerned about the trend of the coronavirus in Australia - with a chief medical officer warning that more deaths are imminent.  Pictured: ADF employee carries samples from COVID-19 test clinic in Melbourne

Experts are concerned about the trend of the coronavirus in Australia – with a chief medical officer warning that more deaths are imminent. Pictured: ADF employee carries samples from COVID-19 test clinic in Melbourne

Twenty-six people are hospitalized with coronavirus across the country.  There are 22 people in the hospital in Victoria, six of whom are in intensive care.  Picture: graph of hospital admissions in Australia from yesterday.  Two people have been placed at ICU since its inception

Twenty-six people are hospitalized with coronavirus across the country.  There are 22 people in the hospital in Victoria, six of whom are in intensive care.  Picture: graph of hospital admissions in Australia from yesterday.  Two people have been placed at ICU since its inception

Twenty-six people are hospitalized with coronavirus across the country. There are 22 people in the hospital in Victoria, six of whom are in intensive care. Picture: graph of hospital admissions in Australia from yesterday. Two people have been placed at ICU since its inception

CORONAVIRUS CASES IN AUSTRALIA: 8,066

New South Wales: 3,211

Victoria: 2368

Queensland: 1067

Western Australia: 611

South Australia: 443

Tasmania: 228

Australian Capital Territory: 108

Northern Territory: 30

TOTAL CASES: 8,066

RESTORED: 7,092

CURRENT ACTIVE CASES: 458

KILL: 104

Victoria’s Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton warned that there may be more deaths following the state’s massive spike in the past two weeks.

“If you have a significant transfer from the community, if you have about 70 cases every day, there is definitely a possibility, an expectation, that some of those people will die,” he said.

As of Thursday, seven of the new cases in Victoria have been linked to outbreaks in schools.

With 17 schools closed for cleaning in recent weeks following cases of COVID-19, Professor Sutton said he will consider whether students in the closed areas should return to school.

On Thursday, state government also confirmed that veteran judge Jennifer Coate will lead an investigation into Victoria’s hotel quarantine program.

Much of the recent cases of the state can be traced to infections by security personnel in hotels receiving returning travelers.

Thirty-six suburbs in north Melbourne are now shut down to contain the outbreak.

The closure lasts four weeks and took effect Wednesday from 11:59 PM, urging locals to avoid nonessential travel.

Meanwhile, Coles has been forced to impose a two-pack limit on products such as butter, cheese and fresh milk in Victoria, Tasmania and parts of NSW after several employees tested positive for COVID-19 at their distribution center in Laverton.

A Marvel Stadium security contractor also tested positive for COVID-19, but on-site AFL matches continue as planned.

Mary-Louise McLaws, a UNSW epidemiologist and expert in the advisory panel of the World Health Organization Experts, told Daily Mail Australia that the numbers give people a false sense of security and that the pattern over the past 14 days has been “frightening.”

She said that we have gone from an average number of cases in the high 90s to threefold.

Professor McLaws said that Victoria is of particular concern, but the government deserves credit for its actions.

“Closing off those areas is an important step. When you have an outbreak under control, it is never a pleasant thing to do. If you don’t act fast enough, you will end up in a place where you can no longer come from, but if you act quickly, like two weeks ago, the complaints will start to come in, “she said.

Thirty-six suburbs in north Melbourne are now shut down to contain the outbreak.  Picture: the locked postcodes

Thirty-six suburbs in north Melbourne are now shut down to contain the outbreak.  Picture: the locked postcodes

Thirty-six suburbs in north Melbourne are now shut down to contain the outbreak. Picture: the locked postcodes

Victoria's Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton warned that there may be more deaths following the state's massive spike in the past two weeks.  Pictured: Melbourne test clinic

Victoria's Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton warned that there may be more deaths following the state's massive spike in the past two weeks.  Pictured: Melbourne test clinic

Victoria’s Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton warned that there may be more deaths following the state’s massive spike in the past two weeks. Pictured: Melbourne test clinic

She said the government should go a step further and prevent people from leaving for work or study because research shows that people are contagious two weeks before symptoms appear.

Professor McLaws said that if the government does not want that, they should make it mandatory for anyone who leaves the area to wear a fabric mask on their way to and from their workplace, regardless of whether they are sick or not.

The World Health Organization updated its guideline on masks on June 5 to state that they:either for the protection of healthy persons (worn to protect themselves when they come into contact with an infected person) or for source control (worn by an infected person to prevent further transmission) ‘.

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