Covid-19 Australia: Sunrise’s David Koch criticizes Morrison government for ‘no race’ vaccine strategy

0

‘It’s bulldust’: Sunrise host David Koch dismisses Deputy Prime Minister’s claims Australia’s Covid vaccine rollout is ‘not a race’

  • The presenter caught on Monday with the slow roll-out of the coronavirus vaccine in Australia
  • Comes after ministers including Prime Minister Scott Morrison said the rollout was ‘not a race’
  • Koch called his administration’s ‘slow and steady’ rhetoric against jab ‘bulldust’

Sunrise presenter David Koch has let go of the slow rollout of the Covid-19 vaccine in Australia after the federal government said the program was ‘not a race’.

The presenter criticized the delivery of the vaccine after Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack made the remark on Sunday amid rising demand for the jab in lockdown-stricken Victoria.

“It’s not a race, it has to be systematic,” McCormack said on Sunday, echoing the same phrase Morrison has used repeatedly to describe the program.

Only 500,000 Australians – about 2.5 percent of the adult population – have so far been fully vaccinated against the virus.

Koch called the attitude “bulldust” Monday morning when interviewing Qantas CEO Alan Joyce – who said nailing down the vaccine rollout was key to getting his airline’s planes back on the air.

Staff are seen preparing vaccine doses at the Melbourne Exhibition Center on Friday. Sunrise presenter David Koch has commented on Australia’s slow Covid-19 vaccine rollout and government’s stance that the program is ‘not a race’

‘It’s not a race’, ‘slow and steady’, are you frustrated about this?’ the presenter asked Joyce on sunrise.

‘Wet’ [Sunrise co-host Natalie Barr] took the health secretary brilliantly on Friday and even over the weekend Michael McCormack and Dan Tehan the secretary of commerce all said: ‘This is not a race’.

‘Bull dust. It’s a race isn’t it?’

Health Minister Greg Hunt had told Barr Australia’s vaccination rate was 20 per cent, although that figure also included adults who had only received their first dose.

The government has maintained that Australians need both doses of the vaccine to be fully vaccinated against the virus.

Joyce said the rollout was the latest step in reopening Australia’s international borders, adding that he had a “vested interest” in the success of the program.

Qantas CEO Alan Joyce said the vaccine rollout was key to getting his airline's planes back in the air

Qantas CEO Alan Joyce said the vaccine rollout was key to getting his airline’s planes back in the air

“We want to do everything we can to ensure that borders remain open domestically and that we can work internationally,” he said.

“We have resigned 6,000 of our people who work on international flights and they will resign until international borders are open again.”

On Sunday morning, Mr McCormack said Australia was well on track to vaccinate its citizens.

“That’s why 120,000 Australians got the shot yesterday, 120,000 the day before and 111,000 the day before,” he said. Sky News.

‘We are working on the vaccinations, already 4.1 million. I urge and encourage Australians to listen and watch this show to ensure that when they are able, they qualify, get the first shot and follow the second.”

Pictured: A line for a Covid-19 test in Melbourne on Thursday.  Only about 2.5 percent of Australia's adult population has so far been fully vaccinated against the virus

Pictured: A line for a Covid-19 test in Melbourne on Thursday. Only about 2.5 percent of Australia’s adult population has so far been fully vaccinated against the virus

Acting Victorian Prime Minister James Merlino has claimed a faster vaccine rollout in Australia may have prevented his state's rapid seven-day lockdown

Acting Victorian Prime Minister James Merlino has claimed a faster vaccine rollout in Australia may have prevented his state’s rapid seven-day lockdown

Acting Victorian Prime Minister James Merlino is among many who are pointing the finger at the federal government for the slow delivery of the jab.

He said a successful rollout of vaccines and suitable quarantine facilities may have changed Victoria’s fate and prevented the swift seven-day lockdown.

On Thursday, Mr Hunt admitted there were 16 retirement homes in Victoria where residents and workers had not received a single dose of the vaccine.

Advertisement

.