Covid-19 Australia: Police won’t charge Sydney movers who caused Victoria’s fifth lockdown

Covid-infected Sydney movers who caused Victoria’s fifth lockdown WILL NOT be punished

  • 3 movers in Sydney unlikely to be charged after causing Covid outbreak
  • Workers delivered furniture to Maribyrong’s Apartments before going to SA. traveled
  • Men were found not to have broken any rules, except for one man who was not wearing a mask
  • Vic enters 5th lockdowns after four complex residents tested positive for Covid
  • Comes as an Echuca pub owner was fined $22,000 for opening during lockdown

Three Sydney movers who sparked a Covid outbreak in Melbourne, which has closed Victoria for the fifth time, are unlikely to face charges.

The workers traveled from the Covid-ravaged western suburbs of Sydney to Melbourne to deliver furniture to multiple locations, before traveling to South Australia.

The men were charged with not wearing masks and violating the terms of their work permits.

However, the Herald Sun has revealed that the police will close the case without punishing the movers.

The Covid-infected Sydney movers found not to have broken any rules after delivering furniture to Maribyong apartment complex

This image depicts the route the movers took in Sydney on their work trip

This image depicts the route the movers took in Sydney on their work trip

The workers were found not to have broken any rules, except for one man who could be fined $1,000 for not wearing a mask.

They all had proper permits to enter the state, despite the rising number of Covid cases in Harbor City, which now has more than 1,500 cases.

Victoria Covid-19 commander Jeroen Weimar said the movers were not wearing masks as waivers are granted for strenuous activities such as carrying furniture.

As a result, numerous residents became infected with the virus at Ariele Apartments in Melbourne’s eastern suburbs, forcing the entire building and its 200 residents to quarantine for 14 days.

It comes as a pub owner in remote Echuca, in northern Victoria near the NSW border, was fined more than $22,000 for opening his hotel against lockdown rules.

Publican Trevor Andrews fined $22,000 after keeping his Echuca pub open during lockdown

Publican Trevor Andrews fined $22,000 after keeping his Echuca pub open during lockdown

Trevor Andrews of the Pastoral Hotel Echuca had been open to customers for three days, serving meals and drinks in violation of lockdown rules.

The tax collector was warned and later fined two before the local police arrested him.

“We take it very seriously as he has just deliberately and blatantly violated the CHO (Chief Health Officer) guidelines,” Patton told Melbourne radio station 3AW.

“Common sense has not prevailed.”

The police commissioner said he had been released on bail under certain conditions and that he could face jail time if reopened.

“We would probably ask for his pre-trial detention. It’s nonsense what he’s doing,” he said.

Patton said the stunt ultimately cost the community more than $100,000, with an additional 47 staff and guests at the hotel also receiving fines.

Opposition police spokesman David Southwick wondered why a tax collector had been fined hundreds of miles from known outbreaks while the movers had not yet been punished.

“Victorians expect these rules to be enforced fairly and consistently,” he said.

HOW THE VIRUS SPREADS FROM SYDNEY TO MELBOURNE

Three movers from Sydney arrived at a house in Craigieburn on the northern outskirts of Melbourne on July 8, where they delivered furniture.

CCTV footage showed them moving items in their truck and walking across a parking lot without face coverings.

Two of the three men would later test positive for the highly contagious strain of the Indian Delta, with the visit sending the long-suffering Victorian residents into their fifth lockdown and triggering more than 100 new infections.

Work permits allowing people from NSW to go to Victoria for essential work require them to wear face masks.

As a result, numerous residents became infected with the virus in Ariele Apartments, forcing the entire building and its 200 residents to quarantine for 14 days.

A resident in his 60s passed the virus to his parents, aged 89 and 90, who live in Craigieburn.

The same man also attended an AFL game between Carlton and Geelong in the MCG on July 10 with a friend, a Bacchus Marsh Grammar teacher.

The friend, a Barwon Heads man in his 50s, also tested positive, as did two members of his household, another man in his 60s and a nine-year-old child.

An adult and child who were in the same area of ​​the MCG as the two men also tested positive in a case of suspected “stranger-to-stranger transmission.”

Several more positive cases linked to the MCG chain of transmission would soon follow with infections also piling up from the Craigieburn cluster.

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