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Covid-19 Australia: NSW records 25,168 new cases and 46 deaths

NSW records its deadliest day with 46 virus-related deaths and sees a DROP in Covid cases – as Victoria reports 20 deaths and 18,167 new infections

  • New South Wales recorded 25,168 new Covid-19 cases and 46 overnight deaths
  • Victoria reported 18,167 new infections and 20 deaths on Friday
  • Leading epidemiologist revealed promising signs the outbreak was ‘plateauing’
  • Catherine Bennett warned that the daily death toll will remain high in the coming weeks



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NSW has recorded the deadliest day of the Covid pandemic with 46 deaths reported overnight.

The new deaths come after an additional 25,168 cases were reported in the state on Friday — down from the 30,825 recorded Thursday.

In Victoria, deaths rose to 20 – up from 15 recorded the previous day – while new cases fell to 18,167 – down from 21,966.

Hospital admissions have fallen in both states with NSW logging at 2,743 – down 2,781 – and Victoria reporting 1,096 – down 1,206.

The new cases come as a leading epidemiologist warns that the state’s rising numbers of cases will not be reflected in the death toll for some time to come.

There are “promising” signs that the state is past the worst of the outbreak, said epidemiologist Catherine Bennett of Deakin University.

While the number of cases is unlikely to fall any time soon, as you would expect with a peak, Prof. Bennett says they appear to have reached a plateau — with 30,825 positive results reported Thursday.

A leading epidemiologist has warned that the state's rising numbers of cases will not be reflected in the death toll for some time to come

A leading epidemiologist has warned that the state’s rising numbers of cases will not be reflected in the death toll for some time to come

The number of hospital admissions is also no longer rising rapidly – with 82 on Thursday to 2,781 patients, the first drop since December 13.

“It’s really complicated because of the changes in testing protocols and the availability of testing has been an issue,” she said.

“But all the indicators, while none of them are really reliable and they’ve all shifted … look good.”

However, the number of people who become seriously ill and die from the virus may not drop for weeks, she says.

NSW reported another 25 deaths on Thursday and is likely to cross the 1,000 death threshold on Friday.

The number of IC admissions also remains high: 212 people are being cared for, 68 are on ventilators.

Those two stats are the most important to look at, says Professor Bennett.

“When people go on a ventilator, they sit there for weeks instead of a short ICU visit,” she said.

“If our ventilation numbers drop to 20 or 10, we know we won’t see as many bad results in the coming weeks.”

Also, the decline in the more serious Delta variant, newly approved early intervention treatments for COVID-19 and greater adoption of vaccine boosters will lower death rates.

Also, the decline in the more serious Delta variant, newly approved early intervention treatments for COVID-19 and greater adoption of vaccine boosters will lower death rates.

Also, the decline in the more serious Delta variant, newly approved early intervention treatments for COVID-19 and greater adoption of vaccine boosters will lower death rates.

Also, the decline in the more serious Delta variant, newly approved early intervention treatments for COVID-19 and greater adoption of vaccine boosters will lower death rates.

“Hopefully the booster will kill Delta,” she said.

It comes as the NSW government prepares to unveil its plan to get the child safely to school at the end of the month.

NSW and Victoria presented their plan to the national cabinet on Thursday, after which Prime Minister Scott Morrison said the federal government had agreed to split the costs 50-50, with states choosing to audit students and teachers.

Mr Perrottet had previously confirmed that surveillance testing would play a role “at least in the short term” to ensure schools remain open from the first day of the first semester – February 1.

Nearly four in five primary school children in NSW have yet to receive their first vaccine dose.

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