Covid-19 Australia: NSW records 1,029 cases

Three unvaccinated NSW residents have died of Covid-19 when the state discovered a record 1,029 cases overnight and Gladys Berejiklian announced new liberties for those who had received both doses as of Sept. 13.

The NSW Prime Minister said 185 cases are linked to known clusters and the source of 844 infections is still under investigation.

As of Monday, September 13, she announced that anyone who has been fully vaccinated and lives outside a care area can gather in groups of up to five in their own LGA or within 3 miles of their home.

Residents living in households where all adults have been vaccinated in one of the 12 LGAs of concern will be allowed to go outside for an additional hour on top of their one-hour exercise limit.

Daily Mail Australia understands the public health order changes were approved on Wednesday after a crisis state cabinet meeting.

The new freedoms come after the state met Ms. Berejiklian’s goal of getting six million punches by the end of August, nearly a week earlier.

The state leader said NSW is on track to fully vaccinate 70 percent of the population by mid-October, bringing further freedoms for the fully vaccinated.

A host of restrictions will be eased from Monday to provide incarcerated Sydneysiders with more reasonable excuses to leave their homes

Pedestrians are pictured in Sydney as the city weathers its ninth week of lockdown restrictions

Pedestrians are pictured in Sydney as the city weathers its ninth week of lockdown restrictions

Pedestrians are pictured in Sydney as the city weathers its ninth week of lockdown restrictions

Companies can deny service to anyone who refuses to get the Covid-19 shot.  Pictured is a supermarket in Westfield East Gardens, located in one of the 12 Sydney Covid hotspot LGAs

Companies can deny service to anyone who refuses to get the Covid-19 shot.  Pictured is a supermarket in Westfield East Gardens, located in one of the 12 Sydney Covid hotspot LGAs

Companies can deny service to anyone who refuses to get the Covid-19 shot. Pictured is a supermarket in Westfield East Gardens, located in one of the 12 Sydney Covid hotspot LGAs

The easing of restrictions comes after NSW reached six million vaccinations earlier this week.  Pictured are Sydneysiders receiving the AstraZeneca vaccine at the Bankstown Sports Club in the south west of the city

The easing of restrictions comes after NSW reached six million vaccinations earlier this week.  Pictured are Sydneysiders receiving the AstraZeneca vaccine at the Bankstown Sports Club in the south west of the city

The easing of restrictions comes after NSW reached six million vaccinations earlier this week. Pictured are Sydneysiders receiving the AstraZeneca vaccine at the Bankstown Sports Club in the south west of the city

Companies have the right to refuse someone who has not been vaccinated.  Pictured is a fishmonger in south west Sydney

Companies have the right to refuse someone who has not been vaccinated.  Pictured is a fishmonger in south west Sydney

Companies have the right to refuse someone who has not been vaccinated. Pictured is a fishmonger in south west Sydney

Sydneysiders are in the 10th week of lockdown, which has been extended until the end of September.

Meanwhile, companies have the right to reject anyone who refuses to get the Covid-19 shot under existing laws, Prime Minister Scott Morrison has confirmed.

Morrison has told federal parliament that refusing services is a “legitimate matter” for companies to protect their staff and customers, despite warnings from the Australian Human Rights Commission.

Poll

Should companies and service providers have the right to turn down anyone who refuses to get the shot?

  • Yes 664 votes
  • new 491 votes

Millions of Australians have rolled up their sleeves for the shot with the promise of greater freedoms once they’ve had both shots.

A company can deny access or service to anyone as long as they do not violate anti-discrimination laws based on race, age, gender or disability under existing laws and have the Prime Minister’s support to do so.

“That’s a legitimate thing for them to do,” Morrison told parliament on Wednesday.

‘They do that to protect their own employees, to protect their other customers.

“It has nothing to do with ideology, or these issues of freedom,

‘We all believe in freedom, but we also believe in people being healthy.

“And the simple fact is that if you’re not vaccinated, you pose a greater health risk to yourself, your family, your community and others about you.”

However, the Australian Human Rights Commission has urged businesses and service providers to exercise caution before imposing a general rule requiring vaccination as a precondition for entry, or for the supply or delivery of goods, services and facilities.

“There are medical reasons why a person may not be able to receive a COVID-19 vaccination, or may in their circumstances choose not to, including because of protected characteristics such as pregnancy or disability,” the committee states on its website. .

“In addition, many younger Australians are currently not eligible for certain Covid-19 vaccinations at all or for a shorter period of time than older Australians.”

More than half of all Australians over the age of 16 have received one vaccine dose, while 31.6 percent are now fully vaccinated.

Australians are flocking to be vaccinated with the promise of more freedoms.  Pictured are queues at Sydney Olympic Park vaccination hub

Australians are flocking to be vaccinated with the promise of more freedoms.  Pictured are queues at Sydney Olympic Park vaccination hub

Australians are flocking to be vaccinated with the promise of more freedoms. Pictured are queues at Sydney Olympic Park vaccination hub

The cabinet will meet on Friday to discuss a proposal to link certain freedoms to a vaccine passport once 70-80 percent of the population is fully vaccinated.

Freedoms may include attending sporting events, concerts, and companies may have the right to expel people who have not been vaccinated.

But Morrison faces resistance from some of his own MPs, who argue that a vaccine passport will create two classes of citizens.

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