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Covid-19 Australia: More than 7.5 million Aussies have caught Covid

While more than 7.5 million Australians have contracted Covid-19 since the start of the pandemic, fewer than 10,000 of those infected have died.

As of January 2020, Australia has reported 7.8 million Covid cases and 9,269 have died while infected – the majority being more than 80.

Of the Covid-19-related deaths reported on June 17, 1,830 men and 1,311 women in this age group are believed to have died with the virus.

Figures from the Ministry of Health showed that of those 90 years or older, 1,029 men and 1,286 women died of Covid.

New research has found that more than three million Australians were infected with Covid-19 at the end of February (pictured, a nurse conducts a Covid-19 test in Sydney)

New research has found that more than three million Australians were infected with Covid-19 at the end of February (pictured, a nurse conducts a Covid-19 test in Sydney)

The number of deaths in the age group 70 to 79 was 1,175 men and 620 women, then halved for the age group 60 to 69 to 523 men and 288 women.

Still fewer were the 220 men and 135 women who died between the ages of 50 and 59, while there were only 87 men and 52 women aged 40 to 49.

The number of fatalities fell even more drastically for lower age groups – to just 50 men and 30 women aged 30 to 39 and 14 men and 13 women between the ages of 20 and 29.

Teens and older children ages 10 to 19 had four male and three female deaths, along with just five boys and four girls under 10.

The death toll among older Australians is despite many more younger people being infected and surviving on little more than the flu.

Most infections were recorded in Australians aged 20 to 29, with 844,028 cases, followed by those between 30 and 39.

The study used samples given by 5,185 unidentified blood donors, ages 18 to 89, who were tested for the presence of Covid-19 antibodies (pictured, medical personnel transport a patient)

The study used samples given by 5,185 unidentified blood donors, ages 18 to 89, who were tested for the presence of Covid-19 antibodies (pictured, medical personnel transport a patient)

In comparison, since the start of the pandemic, 71,752 infections have been recorded in 80- to 89-year-olds and less than 25,000 in those over 90.

This means that despite more cases being detected in younger age groups, those aged 70 and older had significantly higher death rates.

Men between the ages of 80 and 89 have the highest death rates with 1,830 deaths, followed by women in the same age range with 1,311 deaths.

People with high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes or cancer were found to be more vulnerable to serious illness or death if they contracted Covid.

While all age groups are at risk of contracting the virus, those over 70 are at greater risk because of potential underlying health conditions and physiological changes associated with aging.

Scientists keep a close eye on one of the dominant new strains of Covid-19 for signs it could attack the lungs like the deadly Delta strain did

Scientists keep a close eye on one of the dominant new strains of Covid-19 for signs it could attack the lungs like the deadly Delta strain did

The most recent NSW Covid report said there was nothing so far to prove BA.4 or BA.5 was more deadly than predecessors (pictured, a nurse conducts a Covid-19 test in Sydney)

The most recent NSW Covid report said there was nothing so far to prove BA.4 or BA.5 was more deadly than predecessors (pictured, a nurse conducts a Covid-19 test in Sydney)

Scientists are closely monitoring one of the dominant new strains of Covid for signs it could attack the lungs in the same way as the deadly Delta strain.

A medical surveillance report on changes in the evolving Covid picture says BA.4 and BA.5 will dominate in the coming weeks and be the cause of rising infections.

The BA.2 subvariant of the Omicron strain has dominated genomic testing, but BA.4 and BA.5 seem to be taking over.

“BA.4 and BA.5 are expected to become the dominant strain and likely to be associated with an increase in infections in the coming weeks,” said the June 11 NSW Respiratory Surveillance Report.

The NSW Covid report said there was nothing so far to prove that BA.4 or BA.5 was more deadly than its predecessors.

“There is no evidence of a difference in disease severity, but this is being closely monitored,” the report said.

Scientists are closely monitoring one of the dominant new strains of Covid-19 for signs it could attack the lungs in the same way the deadly Delta strain did (stock image)

Scientists are closely monitoring one of the dominant new strains of Covid-19 for signs it could attack the lungs in the same way the deadly Delta strain did (stock image)

The timing of any increase in Covid-19 infections due to the BA.4 and BA.5 sublines will depend on a combination of factors, including growth benefit, immunity levels in the population, and environmental and behavioral factors (e.g. social mixing, isolation during illness).’

Figures from the NSW Respiratory Surveillance Report for June 11 appeared to show that Covid-19 remains disproportionately dangerous for the elderly.

Of the 80 deaths analyzed in the report, 73 were of age 70 or older.

As of March 2020, Australia has seen 7.75 million Covid-19 cases, with 9,269 people dying from the virus.

While NSW has seen more cases than any other state – 2.7 million – Victoria has the highest number of deaths, 3,702.

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